Dc tco in_a_nutshell

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  • 1. Cisco DC TCO in a nutshell Jose Moreno (josemor@cisco.com) Systems Engineer 5. Juli 2012Presentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 1
  • 2. Improving the application performancePresentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 2
  • 3. Cisco Application Networking Services  Wide Area Application Services Consolidate IT infrastructure from the branch into the DC… … and make sure your users do not suffer from performance degradation!  Data Center Application Services Make sure your DC can scale in a flexible and cost-effective manner with Cisco ACE Load Balancers Virtualizing your Load Balancing Infrastructure is crucial for the road to the "cloud" Pay-as-you-grow, with license-based scalability models, that avoid costly fork-lift upgradesPresentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 3
  • 4. Nexus technologiesPresentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 4
  • 5. Nexus Unified I/O Fewer interfaces means: Fewer cards pro Server ⇒ power savings ⇒ $$$ Neater cabling ⇒ Better airflow ⇒ power savings ⇒ $$$ Fewer network switches ⇒ $$$ FC HBA SAN (FC) LAN (Ethernet) FC HBA SAN (FC) CNA SAN (FCoE) NIC LAN (Ethernet) SAN (FCoE) CNA LAN (Ethernet) NIC LAN (Ethernet) CNA = Converged Network Adapter 5Presentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential
  • 6. Nexus Fabric Extender  Top-of-the-Rack (ToR) designs offer best cabling designs, but imply a lot of devices to manage Top of the Rack (ToR)  End-of-the-Row (EoR) designs are optimum from a network perspective: fewer devices to manage, but cabling is costly End of the Row (EoR) Physical topology with Nexus FEX Logical topology with Nexus FEX A A A1 A2 A3 A4 Optimized Optimized forfor cabling: management: $$$ $$$ Rack Rack Rack Rack Rack Rack Rack RackPresentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 6
  • 7. Nexus VM-aware Networking Server 1 Server 2 Server 3 VM VM VM VM VM VM VM VM VM VM VM VM #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 VEM VMware vSwitch VEM VMware vSwitch VMware vSwitch VEM VMW ESX VMW ESX VMW ESX  Non-Disruptive operational Model  Clear administrative borders  Mobility of network and security PropertiesPresentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 7
  • 8. Achieving synergiesPresentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 8
  • 9. I/O Consolidation + Fabric Extender Traditional switching FCoE + Fabric Extender  Multiple points of management  Unified Fabric with Fabric extender FC  Single point of management Ethernet Blade switches  Reduced cables Fiber between racks  High cable count Copper in racksPresentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 9
  • 10. I/O Consolidation and VM-aware networking  Reduced CPU utilization  More VMs per server through hypervisor bypass  VM-aware networking for FC (VMDirectPath technology) and Ethernet  vhbas supported!  Standards-based (SR-IOV) Hypervisor Hypervisor Virtual Virtual Virtual Virtual Virtual Virtual Machine Machine Machine Machine Machine MachinePresentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 10
  • 11. The architecture with the whole picture: Unified ComputingPresentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 11
  • 12. Tight integration: Unified Computing System Reduced Points of Universal Scalable Infrastructure Optimized Virtualization Scalable Virtualization Management Interconnect Unified embedded Unified Fabric to Fabric Extender for wire 2 to 640 4 core processors up to 6000 Virtual Machines in a management and service PCIe bus once connectivity per virtualization pool (Intel virtualization pool processor Nehalem x86 chipset) Open interfaces Seamless Up to 320 nodes Network Optimized for up to 384 GB per node for in accommodating existing connectivity to DCE, managed as a single granular VMotion and memory computations management investments FCoE, & 10GE integrated system dynamic provisioning control The “Unified Computing” Solution CAPEX and OPEX Solution Targets 20% Site TCO (CAPEX and 15% Platform TCO (CAPEX and 35% Organization TCO (OPEX) OPEX) OPEX) 2.Fewer FTE/”Service” 2.Reduced ‘System’ Power 2.Radically Fewer Components 3.Faster Provisioning 3.Lower Cooling 3.Lower HW/SW Costs 4.Seamless Repurposing 4.Better Use of Space 4.More VM’s Per Node 5.Better Coordination 5.Lower Power/Site 5.Better Performance Per NodePresentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 12
  • 13. Presentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 13