Neurovascular topography of the face and neck

  • 865 views
Uploaded on

Anatomy presentation on the neurovascular topography of the face and neck. DOWNLOAD TO SEE THE COMMENTS. The slides are very basic - most of the info is contained in the comments which I read during …

Anatomy presentation on the neurovascular topography of the face and neck. DOWNLOAD TO SEE THE COMMENTS. The slides are very basic - most of the info is contained in the comments which I read during the presentation.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
865
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
72
Comments
0
Likes
2

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. , DDS & , DDS Periodontology Residents PGY1 September 23, 2013
  • 2. • Includes the area bordered within the hairline, anterior border of the auricles, and the chin. • Major contents: eyes, nose, mouth, muscles of facial expression, muscles of mastication, parotid gland, trigeminal nerve, and facial nerve. • The forehead is common to both scalp and face.
  • 3. Innervation of the face is principally derived from the three branches of the trigeminal nerve. V1 – Ophthalmic Nerve V2 – Maxillary Nerve V3 – Mandibular Nerve
  • 4. Ophthalmic Nerve BRANCHES: The ophthalmic nerve contributes several branches to the upper eyelid, the forehead and scalp, and the external nose.
  • 5. Maxillary Nerve BRANCHES: On the face, the infraorbital nerve breaks up into three sets of branches.
  • 6. Mandibular Nerve BRANCHES: The cutaneous contribution of the mandibular nerve to the face is fairly widespread.
  • 7. Trigeminal Pain Referred Pain: Pain seems to originate from one location, but the actual source of pain is remote or is a different structure. Trigeminal Neuralgia: • Intensely painful • Usually affects the V2 or V3 division. • Usually unilateral • Cause is unknown • Treatments include: • Tegretol (anticonvulsant) • Sectioning the sensory route of the nerve. • Injection of alcohol or glycerol into trigeminal ganglion. • Nerve decompression. • Radiofrequency rhizotomy
  • 8. The cervical plexus supplies a small amount of sensory innervation to the face
  • 9. • Motor supply: • Facial nerve • Motor branches of V3 Mandibular nerve • The facial nerve divides into the Temporofacial and Cervicofacial trunks. • These trunks then divide into the 5 main branches before emerging from the parotid gland.
  • 10. Facial Nerve Temporofacial Division:
  • 11. Facial Nerve Cervicofacial Division:
  • 12. Bell’s Palsy• Damage to facial nerve • Affected side is motionless • Loss of wrinkles • Eye cannot be closed • In smiling the mouth is drawn to normal side • During mastication food accumulates in vestibule of mouth
  • 13. Hypoglossal Nerve • Cranial nerve XII • Arises from rootlets of the medulla oblongata • Innervates the intrinsic tongue muscles. Ansa Cervicalis • From ventral rami of C1 – C3 • Innervates the omohyoid, sternohyoid and sternothryoid mm.
  • 14. Main Branches of External Carotid • SUPERFICIAL TEMPORAL ARTERY • MAXILLARY ARTERY • TRANSVERSE FACIAL ARTERY • FACIAL ARTERY • LINGUAL ARTERY Main Branch of Internal Carotid • OPHTHALMIC ARTERY
  • 15. • SUPERFICIAL TEMPORAL ARTERY • ORIGIN: External Carotid Artery • COURSE: Ascends anterior to ear, to temporal region and ends in the scalp. • MAXILLARY ARTERY • ORIGIN: External Carotid Artery • COURSE: Passes anteriorly between ramus of mandible and sphenomandibular ligament within infratemporal fossa. Passes either superficial or deep to lateral pterygoid unitl reaching pterygopalatine fossa. • TRANSVERSE FACIAL ARTERY • ORIGIN: Superficial temporal artery • COURSE: Crosses face external to the masseter and inferior to the zygomatic arch. • FACIAL ARTERY • ORIGIN: External Carotid Artery • COURSE: Ascends deep to the submandibular gland, winds around the inferior border of the mandible and enters the face. • LINGUAL ARTERY • ORIGIN: External Carotid Artery just inferior to facial artery. • COURSE: Passes deep to the posterior belly of the digastric and sylohyoid mm. Passes deep to the hyoglossus m. and anteriorly between the hyoglossus and genioglossus mm.
  • 16. OPHTHALMIC ARTERY FROM INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY • SUPRATROCHLEAR • SUPRAORBITAL • LACRIMAL • EXTERNAL NASAL • DORSAL NASAL
  • 17. Arteries of the neck arise from • Subclavian artery • Thyrocervical Trunk • Transverse cervical a. • Inferior thyroid a. • Suprascapular & dorsal scapular aa. • Costocervical a. • Common carotid artery • Internal & external carotid aa.
  • 18. Superficial Veins • Facial v. • Angular v. • Supraorbital v. • Supratrochlear v. • Superior/inferior labial vv. • Lateral nasal v. • Submental v. • Retromandibular v. • Maxillary v. • Pterygoid plexus • Inferior alveolar v. • Mental v. • Superficial temporal v. • Transverse facial v.
  • 19. Communicating Veins • Superior ophthalmic v. • Receives blood from the roof of the orbit and the scalp • Inferior ophthalmic v. • Receives blood from the floor of the orbit. • Infraorbital v. • Receives blood from the mid-face, lateral nose, and upper lip • Deep facial v. Deep Veins • Cavernous sinus • Pterygoid plexus
  • 20. Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis • Often caused by an infection that starts in the central part of the face, and travels back into the cavernous sinus. • Affects the contents of the cavernous sinus: • Cranial nerves III, IV, V1, V2, VI • Internal carotid • Common clinical manifestations include: • Ophthalmoplegia • Periorbital edema • Exophthalmos
  • 21. Internal jugular • Occipital v. • Facial v. • Lingual v. • Pharyngeal v. • Superior thyroid v. • Middle thyroid v. External jugular Anterior jugular Subclavian • Vertebral v.