1. Introduction to
Flying Insects
Terms of Use
This presentation and its contents (including text based content, images and
photographs) are owned by Brande...
• Flying insects carry disease and if not
properly controlled can cause
contamination within the food chain
• In non-food ...
Flies are insects of the order
Diptera.
In the order Diptera there are
over 3500 species.
© Brandenburg UK Ltd 2008
Introd...
© Brandenburg UK Ltd 2008
Under optimal conditions a pair
of house flies can produce 191
quintillion
(191,000,000,000,000,...
© Brandenburg UK Ltd 2008
A house fly can travel between
1.5 and 3kms in a day
Introduction to Flies
• The average life cycle is
between 8 days to 2 months
• House flies watch each other
constantly and follow each
other to ...
© Brandenburg UK Ltd 2008
• Wings
• Legs
• Abdomen
• Compound Eye
• Antennae
• Thorax
• Hairs
• Sponge like mouth parts
Fl...
Flying Insects
A compound eye
• Flies eyes feature thousands
of receptors.
• The images that they see is a
sum of all the ...
They are known to carry
pathogenic bacteria such as
Salmonella, Listeria & E-Coli.
© Brandenburg UK Ltd 2008
The Danger of...
• The common house fly can carry up
to 1.9 million bacteria on its body
• Up to 33 million micro-organisms
flourish in a f...
What is foodborne
illness? How does food
become contaminated
• Eating or drinking contaminated food and
drinks can lead to...
• Despite the United States having one of the
safest food systems in the world, the Federal
Government and Centers for Dis...
• Each year food-borne
illnesses cost the United
States an estimated $152
billion in health-related
expenses.
• This equat...
• 11 million people in Canada suffer
foodborne illness each year. This costs
nearly $1.1 billion
• The number of foodborne...
• Reducing foodborne illnesses by 10%
would keep 5 million Americans from
getting sick each year,
• Preventing a single ca...
House Fly Face Fly Fruit Fly Flesh Fly Drain Fly
Musca Domestica Musca autumnalis Drosophilia
Melanogaster
Sarcophagidea r...
Electromagnetic
spectrum
Department of Immunology, The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd....
What does a fly see?
What we see.What a fly sees
The basics of flying
insect attraction:
How UVA is produced
• UVA bulbs are used in Insect light traps to attract
flies.
•...
Insect Light Traps:
Important Considerations
• Response to light varies with the insect and conditions.
• Flies do not see...
What are the key
factors in an Insect Light
Trap (ILT)?
• Studies* have shown that the degree of
attraction increases with...
From Attraction to
Capture
• Once attracted towards an insect light trap, a
flying insect will be killed or captured.
• Th...
Any Questions?
Global Head Office
24 - 29 Navigation Drive
Hurst Business Park
Brierley Hill
West Midlands
DY5 1UT
UK
Tel: +44 1384 47290...
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Intro to flying insects

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Flying insects carry disease and if not properly controlled can cause contamination within the food chain

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Intro to flying insects

  1. 1. 1. Introduction to Flying Insects
  2. 2. Terms of Use This presentation and its contents (including text based content, images and photographs) are owned by Brandenburg UK Ltd. and protected under copyright laws. It is distributed without charge. You are granted permission to distribute it and use it for any purpose provided: • You do not remove these terms of use. • You do not make any other changes to the contents or layout. The information contained in this presentation is provided in good faith. However, Brandenburg UK Ltd will not be liable for any consequences whatsoever arising from its use. Any products referenced in this presentation are used for example only, and should not be construed as a positive or negative endorsement. Any products or techniques referenced in this presentation may be subject to local laws and regulations, and compliance with such is the sole responsibility of the viewer. © Copyright Brandenburg UK Ltd.
  3. 3. • Flying insects carry disease and if not properly controlled can cause contamination within the food chain • In non-food areas, they give rise to the perception that the hygiene at a particular location is poorly managed • It is important to ensure a proactive flying insect control programmes is in place as part of the wider pest control strategy Introduction to Flies
  4. 4. Flies are insects of the order Diptera. In the order Diptera there are over 3500 species. © Brandenburg UK Ltd 2008 Introduction to Flies
  5. 5. © Brandenburg UK Ltd 2008 Under optimal conditions a pair of house flies can produce 191 quintillion (191,000,000,000,000,000,000) in 4 months Introduction to Flies
  6. 6. © Brandenburg UK Ltd 2008 A house fly can travel between 1.5 and 3kms in a day Introduction to Flies
  7. 7. • The average life cycle is between 8 days to 2 months • House flies watch each other constantly and follow each other to find food sources • Flies spread diseases quickly because they move from rotting disease laden garbage, to utensils and foods Fly Facts The lifecycle of a fly
  8. 8. © Brandenburg UK Ltd 2008 • Wings • Legs • Abdomen • Compound Eye • Antennae • Thorax • Hairs • Sponge like mouth parts Fly Facts Typical Anatomy
  9. 9. Flying Insects A compound eye • Flies eyes feature thousands of receptors. • The images that they see is a sum of all the pictures from each receptor • Flies have a very wide sphere of view due to this and can detect very fast movement
  10. 10. They are known to carry pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella, Listeria & E-Coli. © Brandenburg UK Ltd 2008 The Danger of Flies
  11. 11. • The common house fly can carry up to 1.9 million bacteria on its body • Up to 33 million micro-organisms flourish in a fly’s gut • Flies deposit thousands of bacterium every time they land • For every fly you see, 19 more are hidden from view Salmonella E. Coli Cholera Typhoid Dysentery Tuberculosis Fly Facts: Flying insects as Vectors of disease
  12. 12. What is foodborne illness? How does food become contaminated • Eating or drinking contaminated food and drinks can lead to a foodborne illness. • In instances where two or more people get sick from the same food or drink source this is classed as a foodborne illness outbreak. • The three main ways food becomes contaminated are: • Microbiological; Chemical; Physical Microbiological Chemical Physical
  13. 13. • Despite the United States having one of the safest food systems in the world, the Federal Government and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that there are about 48 million cases of foodborne illnesses annually • This is the equivalent of: • 1 in 6 Americans becoming sick, • An estimated 128,000 people being hospitalised • 3,000 deaths Source FDA - What You Need to Know About Foodborne Illness-Causing Organisms in the U.S. http://www.fda.gov/food/resourcesforyou/consumers/ucm103263.htm Flying insects and disease in the USA
  14. 14. • Each year food-borne illnesses cost the United States an estimated $152 billion in health-related expenses. • This equates to $1,850 on average per illness. Source: Business Week - Food borne illnesses in US cost $152 billion http://www.businessweek.com/lifestyle/content/healthday/636595.html Flying insects and disease in the USA
  15. 15. • 11 million people in Canada suffer foodborne illness each year. This costs nearly $1.1 billion • The number of foodborne illnesses from Salmonella and E- coli are greater in Canada than America • More than half of all foodborne illnesses are picked up in restaurants, cafeterias and other food service providers. Sources: Costs of acute bacterial foodborne disease in Canada and the United States. International Journal of Microbiology http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2701860 The Globe and Mail - Higher rate of foodborne illness in Canada than US: report – http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/food-and-wine/higher-rate-of-food-borne-illness-in-canada-than-us- report/article2331264 Flying insects and disease in Canada
  16. 16. • Reducing foodborne illnesses by 10% would keep 5 million Americans from getting sick each year, • Preventing a single case of E-coli O157:H7 would save an estimated $7 million CDC and Food Safety - http://www.cdc.gov/foodborneburden/PDFs/CDC-and-Food-Safety.pdf Fly Facts: The potential effects of reducing foodborne illness
  17. 17. House Fly Face Fly Fruit Fly Flesh Fly Drain Fly Musca Domestica Musca autumnalis Drosophilia Melanogaster Sarcophagidea rudis Psychoda alternata Say 6-7mm in length 6mm in length 3mm in length 12mm in length 3mm in length Medium to dark grey in color Medium to dark grey in color Tan color, red eyes Medium to dark grey in color Brownish grey to black color Breed around garbage and decaying fruit and vegetables Breed in fresh cow manure Breed wherever food is allowed to rot. Over ripened fruit and vegetables Breed around animal carcasses and human excrement Breed around drains and wet areas such as sinks and shower trays Can trasmit E. coli, Salmonella, and Typhoid Transmits pinkeye and Thelazia worms to cattle Associated with Salmonella and E. coli. In close contact with E. coli, salmonella and Vibrio choleae In contact with Bacillus spores, Salmonella and Shigella Common Flies
  18. 18. Electromagnetic spectrum Department of Immunology, The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Box 178, Houston, TX 77030 Filth Fly Peak Eye Sensitivity House fly (Musca domestica) 340-360nm Lesser House fly (Fannia canicularis) 340-350nm Bluebottle fly (Calliphora vomitoria) 344nm Fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) 345-375nm
  19. 19. What does a fly see? What we see.What a fly sees
  20. 20. The basics of flying insect attraction: How UVA is produced • UVA bulbs are used in Insect light traps to attract flies. • These bulbs are designed in a very similar way as normal fluorescent lights, except that a different phosphor is used on the inside of the tube, which emits UV instead of visible light. T8 15W lamp Above: Image of a Brandenburg TT insect light trap taken with a UV camera
  21. 21. Insect Light Traps: Important Considerations • Response to light varies with the insect and conditions. • Flies do not see ILTs more than 30 meters away. • Response increases greatly within 3-4 meters. • Response can be delayed – flies may ignore a trap for a while before becoming attracted. • Flies demonstrate intermittent periods of being attracted to ILTs. • Most flies fly in a zone within 2 meters from the floor (consider this when placing Insect light traps). Flies may not be responsive to an ILT until they have been inside for quite some time.
  22. 22. What are the key factors in an Insect Light Trap (ILT)? • Studies* have shown that the degree of attraction increases with increasing light intensity, and also with increased size of the UV-emitting area. “Brightness and size of the UV-target were the two most important parameters influencing catch”* * Pickens,LG; Thimijan,RW (1986): Design parameters that affect the performance of UV-emitting traps in attracting house flies (Diptera: Muscidae).
  23. 23. From Attraction to Capture • Once attracted towards an insect light trap, a flying insect will be killed or captured. • The two most common methods for capture or kill are: • High voltage grid for killing flying insects (not suitable for areas of food preparation/service) • Control or sticky board – for capturing flying insects whole • Further details on which type of insect light trap is appropriate are available
  24. 24. Any Questions?
  25. 25. Global Head Office 24 - 29 Navigation Drive Hurst Business Park Brierley Hill West Midlands DY5 1UT UK Tel: +44 1384 472900 Fax: +44 1384 472911 Web: www.b-one.com, www.bedbugsalert.com www.brandenburgairsterilization.com

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