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Videotaping & Webcasting Museum Lectures: Access, Social Learning, and Recycling  (v2)
 

Videotaping & Webcasting Museum Lectures: Access, Social Learning, and Recycling (v2)

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Erin Blasco, AAM2013

Erin Blasco, AAM2013

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  • This talk and roundtable discussion may be most helpful if you’re considering creating videos of your museum’s educational offerings. If you’re already doing this, your expertise will be a really valuable addition to the discussion. If you’ve never considered doing this, my session might inspire you to think about it or to create your own model of connecting on-site programs and content with online visitors, and I hope you’ll share what your organization does do or why you have chosen not to go this direction. My presentation is on videotaping and webcasting museum public programs (particularly lectures and workshops) to increase access to people who live far away (or have other barriers to on-site participation), engage off-site visitors in on-site programming * , and to recycle and archive program content. While many museums use video for PR and other purposes, my project was to use video as a tool in extending the reach of educational programming. My point of view is that I work at a medium-sized museum that couldn’t afford a CNN-style studio but wanted to make videos well above the quality of a webcam. We designed a flexible, in-between sized video solution to meet our goals. Participants will come away with thoughts about how video might extend their public programs beyond the walls of their building, a few helpful guideposts to aide their decisions about how to use video, pitfalls to avoid, and some inspirational ideas about how program videos are a great way to do museum education. My session begins with an informal poll followed by a presentation. The second half is a roundtable discussion in which participants will share models in use at their museums, discuss successes/failures, and swap ideas for putting video to work for public programs and other museum uses.
  • Perspective of an educator /social media person
  • So I saw some problems with this…
  • Here’s what spurred the talk. When I started taking on some social media responsibilities, I saw it as a great way to promote on-site programming. But far-off fans and people with busy schedules would ask for access. Or ask us to send the curator to their town. Or ask for a transcript. Busy people would say, “That’s interesting and I live nearby so I’d be able to attend but Saturdays don’t work for me.” This hint of interest from around the country came at a time when I was already frustrated with on-site programming in some ways: My lecture hall was never packed yet I knew people in the world were interested in the topic Content disappeared after programs. Genius authors would present their topics, curators would showcase their research, and afterwards it just disappeared. It wasn’t re-usable or easy to archive. This was annoying to me but also to the audience. Once in a while I’d see a student furiously scribbling notes because the talk related to a paper they had to write—a video of the program would have allowed them to refer to the lecture once at their desks and even link to it in their paper. On-site interactions were great but didn’t continue online before/after on-site programs. Online conversations were also great but didn’t include or have access to on-site programs. I thought, hey maybe video can solve some of these issues. If I videotaped programs, I could maybe get the far-off people to have some access while also maybe reusing the content. And the on-site folks might benefit from being able to access the online content in addition to the on-site stuff. If you arrived 10 minutes late because the metro was delayed, you could re-watch the first ten minutes online to see what you missed! Even if my lecture hall had been packed, I think I would have considered program videos a way to perhaps alleviate space concerns or take obviously popular topics to new audiences. So I looked for examples online. AND HER’S WHAT I DID
  • Important to identify goals BEFORE buying equipment. Access: If you live in California, you can watch my lectures from far away. If you live in DC but work on Saturday afternoons, you can watch them later. Document and Recycle: I could show my co-workers what the lecture looked like and save that content for later in an archive. I could also edit my long lecture videos into small pieces for easier web watching, create a highlights reel, give potential attendees a preview of what NPM lectures were like, even make a podcast. Embed the video clips in blog posts! Be social: People talked before and after my lectures in the museum. There was this collegial, friendly vibe you get when a bunch of stamp dorks are in the room together. It’s a good, supportive learning environment. I wanted our online friends (Facebook fans, Twitter followers, newsletter subscribers) to have that same feeling. And the more I thought about it, the more I realized this ISN’T OPTIONAL. We’re a NATIONAL MUSEUM.
  • Important to identify goals BEFORE buying equipment. Access: If you live in California, you can watch my lectures from far away. If you live in DC but work on Saturday afternoons, you can watch them later. Document and Recycle: I could show my co-workers what the lecture looked like and save that content for later in an archive. I could also edit my long lecture videos into small pieces for easier web watching, create a highlights reel, give potential attendees a preview of what NPM lectures were like, even make a podcast. Embed the video clips in blog posts! Be social: People talked before and after my lectures in the museum. There was this collegial, friendly vibe you get when a bunch of stamp dorks are in the room together. It’s a good, supportive learning environment. I wanted our online friends (Facebook fans, Twitter followers, newsletter subscribers) to have that same feeling. And the more I thought about it, the more I realized this ISN’T OPTIONAL. We’re a NATIONAL MUSEUM.
  • So that’s what my setup looks like. What I want to talk about is what happens once you’re able to webcast—how do you do it right? Make sure your target audience finds it and likes it and you achieve your goals?
  • Make sure all this material you create remains available with the archived/recorded version of the webcast.
  • In the future, I’d like to offer something exclusive to online viewers, such as a post-program Q&A with the author where the author sits in front of the camera and the live audience is gone. Maybe the speaker saves a special anecdote or artifact for them. The on-site viewers could watch it later but for the online folks this would be a great gesture. Really simple stuff… open the online viewing space well before the lecture starts so they don’t see a blank box. Encourage them to engage with each other!
  • Webcasting is about getting your content out there. But the video shouldn’t stand entirely alone. If it’s Write a blog post, live tweet the talk Pulling out a great quote and tweeting that is really powerful. Kind of like what the White House does.
  • I had hesitant speakers. What if I say 1807 when I mean 1707 and the mistake is on video forever? Show them examples of other lectures--how many views and positive comments vs. possible error. Remind them of the promotional potential. The ability to get their name and ideas out there. Make sure they greet online viewers too
  • DO NOT FORGET E-MAIL. IT’s big for call to action like WATCH.
  • Files are big. How will you organize them? Will you enter them in the museum’s digital asset management system? Or maintain some other storage system? When you want to access them later, how will you know what happened in the video? What keywords? Speakers often come back and request a video file way later Have a vision or editing--know what you want to capture so that you have that material later. Take time to fully describe the video and add tags and keywords so that people searching for information on the topic can find it. Don’t just say “Saturday lecture,” make sure you really describe what the speaker discussed. Accessibility can be a tough one. My museum wants to move toward all videos having closed captioning. But that can be time consuming. Decide how you’ll handle this before generating loads of video content. I have seen crowdsourcing projects that had volunteers providing captions and even translations for museum videos--but that’s hard to manage. On our social media, we do THIS DAY IN HISTORY all the time. I want to start incorporating our webcast videos into this. So a talk on George Washington gets promoted on social media on his birthday every year--an excuse to re-use that content.
  • On UStream, it is possible to make text scroll across the screen. You can embed a link to an online survey. That way, anyone watching can be invited to take the survey and give you feedback--and that text won’t appear in the final copy of the video, just the live version. In online surveys I’ve done, I always ask a few of the same questions that were asked on the survey distributed among the on-site audience to see how the audiences differ. I ask some questions about content (topic, speaker, etc), learning outcomes (did you learn something new or surprising, did you get motivated to learn more), as well as some basic questions like how did you hear about this webcast so you can improve your promotional efforts. I also ask about ideal length. Where do you live? In one survey, I found that 54% of online viewers lived close enough to be able to get to the museum but would not have been able to attend if they needed to come to the museum--their schedules were tight or they didn’t have good transportation options. If you’re considering making highlights clips, ask if your viewers would want those. What are the best ways for you to find out about webcasts from the Smithsonian? Facebook: 62%, Email: 54%, Twitter: 39%
  • Audience participation! Take questions and give people credit for asking them!
  • My first webcast was in January of 2010 so I’ve been doing this for a year and ten months. I’ve learned a lot but barely had time to implement the changes I need to make. This all sounds rather sad and negative but the good news is that now that I’ve capture the video footage and completed the program, the video can be edited into highlight clips and made somewhat evergreen. A video on the 40 th anniversary of the postal strike, for example, will be useful when we celebrate the 45 th anniversary and some people who spoke at the program are too elderly to travel to be at the 45 th anniversary. BUT I THINK THERE’S VALUE
  • I don’t know very well if I’m doing a great job recycling content but I know I have a strong archive to pull from. I also think I need to work harder to make these programs social for online viewers and connect on-site viewers to online resources before and after programs. But at least I do know that people have this access and I can build on that.
  • I won’t walk through this since it’s a handout. This chart just shows four different options for program videos. There’s a basic description of each one. I explain how engaging the model can be then point out some good things and less good things about each model.

Videotaping & Webcasting Museum Lectures: Access, Social Learning, and Recycling  (v2) Videotaping & Webcasting Museum Lectures: Access, Social Learning, and Recycling (v2) Presentation Transcript

  • Videotaping & Webcasting MuseumLectures: Access, Social Learning,and RecyclingErin Blasco, education specialist in thenew media department, Smithsonian’sNational Museum of American History@erinblasco  blascoe@si.edu
  • What I’m going to talk about…• Audience-centricapproach towebcasting• Goal-setting• Best practices• Evaluation
  • Me & the Postal Museum• Me: public programs coordinator playingwith social media• 35 on-site programs each year• 9 lecture programs videotaped &webcast live online each year
  • What my lectures looked like• Saturday afternoon• Smart speaker, greatcontent• Audience askingquestions, socializing
  • But…• Social media sparked a demand for access toprograms anywhere, anyplace• At the same time, I was frustrated:– Sometimes empty lecture hall– Content not captured– On-site interactions dead-ended thereSparsely attendedlectureInterest from Facebookfans
  • My goals for webcasting• Provide access to museum lectures to folksbeyond my lecture hall.• Document, archive, recycle content.• Be social. Spark online discussion aboutlectures, just like on-site conversation.• Online audiences achieve learningoutcomes.
  • My goals for webcasting• Provide access to museum lectures to folksbeyond my lecture hall.• Document, archive, recycle content.• Be social. Spark online discussion aboutlectures, just like on-site conversation.• Online audiences achieve learningoutcomesnot optionalnot optional
  • My webcasting set-upSmart person gives a lectureor workshop.On-site audience enjoys theprogram. They can forwardthe video to their friendslater.Camera, mics, coffee, 3laptops (one for slides, onemanaging webcast withWirecast, one for socialmedia).Online, viewers can watchlive on Ustream or watchlater on YouTube.Later, video can be edited for re-use.
  • Audience-centric approach towebcasting• You need a camera. But webcasting is waymore than turning on the camera.
  • Online viewers are people, too!• Provide equivalentsto things on-sitevisitors get to enjoyCan online viewers see thePowerPoint slides?Way to give feedbackMeet theauthor
  • Best Practices in Providing Access• On-site and online = two differentprograms. Don’t just hit record.• Be a good host:– Provide handout– Comfortable setting– Online exhibit tour– Solicit feedback– Say thank youFront door foronline viewers
  • More Best Practices in ProvidingAccess• Share speaker’s slides onSlideShare, or…• Pull in slides• Provide other ways to accessthe content Picture-in-picture shotLive tweeting
  • 13• Incorporating visuals
  • 14Educating speakers• Foreverness =hesitancy• Say hi to onlineviewers• Turn in slides early• Save time for soundcheck• Repeat Q&A
  • Best practices: PromotionFacebook eventTweetsPinterestThe webcast audience and on-site audience aredifferent. Webcasts need their own promotionplans.
  • Best practices: Archiving andrecycling• Plan how you’ll store and organize largevideo files• Have a vision for editing• Your institution’s standards for accessibility• Embed video into blog posts, website, andFacebook, not just YouTube• Work videos into yearly social media
  • 17
  • Be audience-centric:evaluate!• What are the best waysfor you to find out aboutwebcasts from theSmithsonian?• Facebook: 62%• Email: 54%• Twitter: 39%
  • Be social
  • • Integrate social mediafor questions andcomments before,during, after• Use a hashtag soviewers can chat• Bring on-site visitorsinto the onlineconversation: tell themwhere to re-connectwith content, share withfriends• Share related contentDoes anyone have aquestion for thecurator?
  • Try to Limit the “House Keeping”Introduction because it Irritates OnlineViewers• Silence cell phones• No flash photography• Complete the survey;onsite folks win aprize if they completethe survey• Upcoming programs• Exhibit openings• Introducing thespeaker• Let’s get to the show!
  • Stuff I wish I’d known• Live vs. canned– “Live” is nice when it’s an astronaut speaking, butyou may not always have a lot of live viewers(embrace asynchronous learning)• Differing audience needs– Saturday may be great for on-site audiences butawful for online viewers. Whose needs do youprioritize?• Realism about engagement– Most people watch/lurk/spectate, not engage• Not everything is easily recyclable– A 45-minute video is really, really long; editing ishard– Teachers may want 2-minute video clips along withmuseum lesson plans, but speakers may not use
  • Achieving the Goal of ProvidingAccess• For 16 programs that had on-site and onlinecomponents…• 19,848 online views (live and canned)– 7,605 live– 12,243 canned (archived on YouTube or UStream)• 495 on-site audience membersMore thanmy lecturehall holds!Program views
  • 25Any questions?• I’d love to hear from you: Erin Blasco,blascoe@si.edu, @erinblasco
  • Model The 101EngagementLevelAudience Pluses MinusesVideoConferencingThe museum and theviewers have videoconferencing equipment.You see them, they seeyou, all in real time.Face-to-faceinteractionthrough a privatevideo stream.Very engaging forthat group.Classroom, club,special groupHighest level ofengagement; videoquality is great so yourmuseum objects arecrystal clearViewers need equipment.The recorded version of thevideo is less engaging towatch.GoogleHangout onAirLive stream your Hangout viayour YouTube channel andwebsitePretty social withcommenting, chat,etcAnyone with internetIf your audience is big onGoogle+, they’ll love thisWebcastingBroadcast live video viafree sites like UStream.Anyone with internet cantune in. Viewers interactlive via social media. Whenevent is over, videoremains for future viewing.Viewers of thewebcast interactwith each otherand the museumvia Twitter, chat,or other socialmedia.Anyone with internetcan watch the livevideo at theappointed time orthe archived videolater.Best way to get liveinteraction with lots ofpeople. Recordedvideo available onlinepromptly afterprogram.Recording a copy of thevideo while broadcasting livestream, can sacrifice somequality. Picture quality isn’tgreat. People may not tune into the webcast unless it’s abig event.Tape,edit, postThe museum makes avideo of a program. Videoediting software is thenused to trim the video toideal length and deletebloopers. The video isposted online for viewingand commenting.Viewers and themuseum can postcomments on thevideo at any time.Anyone who canwatch a cute catvideo on YouTubecan access andcomment on thevideo.Edited video can bemore pleasing towatch than raw video.Editing can createmultiple versions ofthe video for differentuses, audiences.There will be a delay betweenthe live program and thevideo being made availableonline. Editing is aspecialized skill that takestime to learn and do.Tape andpostThe museum makes avideo of a program andposts the video online.Same as above. Same as above.Posting the videoprovides access to theprogram, plain andsimple. Workload islow.Raw video may not be aspleasing to watch online.There may be a delay inposting the video.