Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Ch 7 graphics and electronic sources
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Ch 7 graphics and electronic sources

872
views

Published on

Chapter seven for ENG 091

Chapter seven for ENG 091

Published in: Education

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
872
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
26
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Guide to College Reading , 8/e Kathleen T. McWhorter Chapter 7 Reading Graphic and Electronic Information PowerPoint by Gretchen Starks-Martin St. Cloud State University, MN Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 2. THIS CHAPTER WILL SHOW YOU HOW TO:
    • Approach graphic information
    • Read and evaluate electronic sources
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 3. A GENERAL APPROACH TO GRAPHICS
    • Read the title or caption.
    • Discover how the graphic is organized.
    • Identify the variables. What comparisons are being made?
    • Analyze the purpose.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 4. A GENERAL APPROACH TO GRAPHICS
    • 5. Determine scale, values, or units of measurement.
    • 6. Study the data to identify trends or patterns.
    • 7. Read the graphic along with corresponding text.
    • 8. Make a brief summary note.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 5. TYPES OF GRAPHICS
    • Graphs
    • Charts
    • Diagrams
    • Tables
    • Maps
    • Photographs
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 6. Tables
    • A table is a listing of facts and figures in columns and rows for quick and easy reference.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers Baseball Scores Game 1 Game 2 Yankees 6 4 Mets 2 3
  • 7. Tables
    • Determine how the information is divided and arranged.
    • Make comparisons and look for trends.
    • Draw conclusions about what the numbers mean.
    • Look for clues in corresponding text.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 8. Graphs
    • Bar graphs
    • Multiple bar graphs
    • Stacked bar graphs
    • Linear graphs
    • Each plots a set of points on a set of axes.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 9. Bar Graphs
    • Bar Graph:
      • A bar graph is used to make comparisons between quantities or amounts and shows changes that occur over time.
      • A series of different items can be quickly compared by noting the different bar lengths.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 10. Multiple Bar Graphs
    • A multiple bar graph makes at least two or three comparisons simultaneously.
    • As you read them, make sure to identify exactly what comparisons are being made.
    • See Figure 10-6 in your book.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 11. Stacked Bar Graphs
    • A stacked bar graph is an arrangement of data in which bars are placed one on top of another rather than side by side.
    • It is often used to emphasize whole/part relationships.
    • See Figure 10-7 in your book.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 12. Linear Graphs
    • Line Graphs:
      • Plots and connects points along a vertical and a horizontal axis.
      • It can compare two or several sets of variables.
      • See Figure 10-8 in your book for an example.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 13. Charts
    • Pie charts
    • Organizational charts
    • Flowcharts
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 14. Pie Charts
    • Pie charts , sometimes called circle graphs, are used to show whole/part relationships or to depict how given parts of a unit have been divided or classified.
    • Examine the chart in Figure 10-12 of your book.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 15. Organizational Charts
    • Organizational charts divide an organization into its administrative parts, staff positions, or lines of authority.
    • Examine the organizational chart in Figure 10-13 of your book.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 16. Flowcharts
    • A flowchart shows how a process or procedure works.
    • Lines or arrows are used to indicate the direction of the steps in the procedure.
    • Various shapes are used.
    • Examine the flowchart in Figure 10-14 of your book.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 17. How to Read a Flowchart
    • Decide what process the flowchart shows.
    • Next, follow the chart, using the arrows and reading each step.
    • When you have finished, summarize the process in your own words.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 18. Diagrams
    • A diagram is an outline drawing or picture of an object or a process.
    • They are often used in technical and scientific textbooks.
    • Diagrams help you visualize relationships between parts and understand sequences.
    • Examine Figure 10-18 in your textbook.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 19. How to Read a Map
    • Read the caption.
    • Use the legend or key to identify the symbols or codes used.
    • Note distance scales.
    • Study the map, looking for trends or key points.
    • Try to visualize, or create a mental picture of, the map.
    • As a learning and study aid, write, in your own words, a statement of what the map shows.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 20. Photographs
    • Read the caption.
    • Ask: “What is my first overall impression?”
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers NASA, Cape Canaveral
  • 21. READING AND EVALUATING INTERNET SOURCES
    • Focus on your purpose for visiting the site.
    • Get used to the site’s design and layout.
      • Spend a few minutes discovering how it is organized.
      • Expect the first screen to grab your attention and make a main point.
      • Consider both the focus of and limitations of your learning style.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 22. READING AND EVALUATING INTERNET SOURCES
    • Pay attention to how information is organized.
      • Use the site map to discover what information is available and how it is organized.
      • Consider the order in which you want to take in information (exploring links).
      • Expect shorter, less detailed sentences and paragraphs.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 23. READING AND EVALUATING INTERNET SOURCES
    • 4. Use links to find the information you need.
      • Plan on exploring links to find complete and detailed information.
      • Bookmark your original site and other useful sites as you follow links.
      • If there are many pages of continuous paragraphs, print the material and read it offline.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 24. Types of Web Sites
    • Informational: to present facts
    • News: to provide current news
    • Advocacy: to promote a cause or point of view
    • Personal: individual interests and accomplishments
    • Commercial: to promote goods or services
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 25. Evaluating Web Sites
    • Evaluating the Content of a Web Site:
      • Appropriateness
      • Source
      • Level of Technical Detail
      • Presentation
      • Completeness
      • Links
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 26. Evaluating Web Sites: Accuracy
    • Are the author’s name and credentials provided?
    • Is contact information for the author included on the site?
    • Is the information complete, or in summary form?
    • If opinions are offered, are they clearly presented as opinions?
    • Does the site provide a list of works
    • cited?
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 27. Evaluating Web Sites: Timeliness
    • The date on which the Web site was posted.
    • The date when the document you are using was added.
    • The date when the site was last revised.
    • The date when the links were last checked.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 28. SELF-TEST SUMMARY
    • How do you read a graphic?
    • How many types of graphics are there, what are they, and how are they used?
    • What types of electronic learning aids accompany textbooks?
    • How is reading electronic text different from reading print text?
    • List five different types of Web sites.
    • What factors should you consider when evaluating a Web site?
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 29. Visit the Companion Website
    • For additional readings, exercises, and Internet activities, visit this book’s Companion Website at:
    • www.ablongman.com/mcwhorter
    • If you need a user name and password, please see your instructor.
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers
  • 30. My Reading Lab
    • For more practice with reading graphics, visit MyReadingLab, click on the Reading Skills tab, and then click on Graphics and Visuals---
    • Wall Street, New York.
    • www.ablongman.com/myreadinglab
    Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing by Longman Publishers