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CSCW 2013 - Investigating the Appropriateness of Social Network Question Asking as a Resource for Blind Users
 

CSCW 2013 - Investigating the Appropriateness of Social Network Question Asking as a Resource for Blind Users

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Presentation for paper "Investigating the Appropriateness of Social Network Question Asking as a Resource for Blind Users" at CSCW 2013. We discuss a survey of blind people's social network use, ...

Presentation for paper "Investigating the Appropriateness of Social Network Question Asking as a Resource for Blind Users" at CSCW 2013. We discuss a survey of blind people's social network use, their thoughts on social networking sites as a resource for question asking, and how financial incentives affected their use of social networking sites for question asking.

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  • 44% were 50+, only ~20% under 3073% used internet for 10+ yearsOnly 1 had used internet for less than a year
  • IP is primarily used in southeast asia
  • NOT A DIRECT COMPARISON
  • (~50% once a day)(~50% posted once a week) 12% of Facebook users posted questions 1+ times a week 26% of Twitter users tweeted questions 1+ times a week(15.4% compared with 12% in this survey) asked questions at least once per week, but only 9.5% of Twitter users did so with similar frequency (as compared with 26% in our survey).34% Facebook users said many or all questions were answered33% of Twitter users said the same
  • (“Do you think questioning on a social network site is an effective way to get answers?”) could be very or somewhat effectivev/s comfortable asking questions?37% of Facebook users 54% of Twitter users
  • 5,329, 40748voiceover
  • Frozen food, Clothing opinions
  • Forced to bear ‘true costs’Is there a point where concerns about speed/privacy are outweighed by financial costs?
  • VOICEOVER
  • 4+ questions/month60 received invitation, 30
  • Not sig. less11 in cheap condition asked 9512 in expensive condition asked 75No sig difference between conditions
  • 83% internet75% used Facebook67% used Twitter
  • (10 web workers, 2 IQ Engines)
  • Speed of response (3), accuracy (4), feedback (1)Preferred anonymity (2), didn’t want to broadcast (1), didn’t like SNSs in general (1)“I preferred web workers…”

CSCW 2013 - Investigating the Appropriateness of Social Network Question Asking as a Resource for Blind Users CSCW 2013 - Investigating the Appropriateness of Social Network Question Asking as a Resource for Blind Users Presentation Transcript

  • Investigating the Appropriateness of Social Network Question Asking as a Resource for Blind UsersErin Brady, Yu Zhong, Meredith Ringel Morris, Jeffrey P. Bigham University of Rochester || Microsoft Research Questions or comments during the talk? Tweet @erinleebradyPhoto used via CC Liscense from http://www.flickr.com/photos/loneblackrider/315302588/
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Usefulness of SNSs for Blind People Have visual questions that need to be answered [Brady 2013]
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Why use SNSs?  Free  High saturation  Low-cost [Pew 2012]  Always-available workers  Personalized and trusted [Morris 2010]  Anonymous  Matches existing model [Kane 2009, Burton 2012]Images used from Facebook, Twitter, and http://imaginarywitness.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/mechanical-turk.jpg
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Primary Questions How do blind people use SNSs? How do blind people view SNSs for question asking? How do blind people ask questions on SNSs in practice?
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Primary Questions Survey of social networking site use How do blind people use SNSs? How do blind people view SNSs for question asking? Field experiment with VizWiz Social How do blind people ask questions on SNSs in practice?
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Survey Design Accessible online survey Available for 3 weeks (Jan/Feb 2012) Advertised via email to NA organizations for the blind Asked participants not to spread survey via SNS Raffled gift card for incentive Survey focused on all types of question-asking
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Demographics 203 completed survey 191 self-reported as blind Ages skewed older, which may reflect onset of blindness Generally had significant internet experience
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Networks Used At 92%, general SNS use higher than average of 66%90 [Pew 2012] 80807060 5250 40403020 1510 4 3 3 1 0 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google MySpace Yammer Inclusive Orkut Plus Planet * χ2(1, N=191) = 55.88, p < .001
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Networks Used 85% used Facebook, Twitter, or both Twitter use higher than general population 90 80 80 70 61 60 52 50 Blind Users 40 30 Pew Study 20 15 10 0 Facebook Twitter* 61% Facebook is calculated from 66% of online adults using SNSs, 92% of those using Facebook
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Network Size Smaller than average network sizes  Facebook median 100 vs. Pew median 111, Facebook stats 130  Twitter median 45 vs. reports of Twitter around 126
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment SNS for Question Asking Logged in frequently General behavior tended toward “lurking” Status message question asking was infrequent Answer rates were low
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment SNS for Question Asking 55% thought SNS question-asking could be effective Few users of SNSs felt comfortable posting questions
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Findings High adoption rate of SNSs  Despite accessibility challenges  Asynchronous communication with physically remote contacts  Twitter in particular (text-based) Status posting and question asking infrequent  Poor response rates  Smaller-than-average network sizes  Concerns about social costs
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Primary Questions Survey of social networking site use How do blind people use SNSs? How do blind people view SNSs for question asking? Field experiment with VizWiz Social How do blind people ask questions on SNSs in practice?
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment VizWiz Social Mobile phone application that answers visual questions Based on concept presented by Bigham et al. 5,000+ blind users asked over 40K questions in first year “Which can is the corn?”
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment General Question TypesIdentification Description Reading Unanswerable 44% 26% 23% 7%
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Answer Sources - Anonymous/Crowdsourced Questions can be sent to:  Web workers  Recruited from Mechanical Turk  Answers in 98 seconds  VizWiz team pays 5¢ per answer  IQ Engines  Human-backed object recognition  VizWiz team pays approximately 1¢ per answer
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Answer Sources - Social/Friendsourced Questions can be sent to:  Broadcast to Social Networking Sites  Facebook/Twitter  Posts made by the VizWiz application  Free to VizWiz team  Email to Individual Contacts  Free to VizWiz Team
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Use of Social Sources In month-long period preceding study:  702 users asked 3116 questions (average 4.44/user)  15% of users had tried social sources, 10.7% excluding email  5% of questions (156) were sent to social sources  94 to Twitter  47 to email  26 to Facebook  Only 3 received answers, with median response time of 2:55:00
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Experimental Design Test the impact of financial restrictions Mirror the existing costs of the VizWiz service Each participant was given $25 balance for a month Split into conditions:  Cheap: 1¢ for IQ Engines, 5¢ for web workers  Expensive: 5¢ for IQ Engines, 25¢ for web workers Remaining balance, plus $10 gratuity, paid at end
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Modified Application
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Experimental Design Recruited from 207 active VizWiz users 30 were recruited, 23 asked 1 or more questions Split evenly into cheap, expensive conditions Analyzed pre-study behaviors:  Asked 217 questions total (average 9.86/user)  81% of questions sent to web workers  93% of questions sent to IQ Engines  14% to social sources (10% to FB, 3% to Twitter, 1% to email)
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment In-Study Behaviors 23 participants asked 170 questions (average 7.3/user)100 93% 90 81% 83% 80 70 60 50 45% Pre-Study 40 In-Study 30 20 10% 10 1% 3% 0% 1% 0% 0 Web Workers IQ Engines Facebook Twitter Email
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Post-Study Questionnaire 12 participants completed the questionnaire Demographics:  7 male, 5 female  Four aged 20-29, six aged 30-39, two aged 50-59  Most had used internet for 10+ years  All used at least one social networking site
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Post-Study Questionnaire All chose crowdsourcing as preferred answer source “Humans are much more reliable, in my opinion, and Web workers are entirely anonymous. They might necessarily not even know that theyre dealing with an accessibility application if Amazon Turkit [sic] is involved.”
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Post-Study Questionnaire Crowdsourcing was preferred to friendsourcing  9/12 “much preferred” web workers  1/12 “somewhat preferred” web workers  2/12 had no preference between web workers or friendsourcing
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Post-Study Questionnaire  Reasons were both technical and personal  Speed of response  Accuracy  Feedback “…because theres no guarantee that a facebook or twitter post would get you an immediate answer. When I need something identified like a can or TV Dinner I amgoing to use it now, not whenever my friends get around to telling me what it is. :) ”  Preferred anonymity  Didn’t want to broadcast  Didn’t like SNSs in general Web-workers are completely anonymous, and there is sometimes no reason to think they are actually assisting with a disability related question.
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Post-Study Questionnaire Restricted question-asking behaviors for social sources  8/12 chose not to ask 1+ questions to social sources  4/12 chose not to ask 1+ questions to crowdsourced sources Social costs played a role in restricted question-asking “Not my friends job to tell me that stuff. Plus it clutters up peoples timelinesand [sic] they might not like it.”
  • Introduction | Survey | Field Experiment Primary Questions Survey of social networking site use How do blind people use SNSs? How do blind people view SNSs for question asking? Field experiment with VizWiz Social How do blind people ask questions on SNSs in practice?
  • Findings0. Friendsourcing can be a valuable resource for Q&A1. Blind people are heavy users of SNSs2. Blind people infrequently use SNSs for QA3. In practice, even practical & financial incentives can’tmotivate blind users to use SNSs for QA
  • Erin Brady, YuZhong, Meredith RingelMorris, Jeffrey P. Bigham University of Rochester Microsoft Research Get in touch via email:brady@cs.rochester.eduor Twitter: @erinleebrady Interested in questions asked by VizWiz users?Come see our talk at CHI! Visual Challenges in the Everyday Lives of Blind People Investigating the AppropriatenessSupported by NSF Awards #IIS-1149709 and #IIS- of Social Network Question Asking 1049080 as a Resource for Blind Users