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    The great designers’ storyboard.pptx The great designers’ storyboard.pptx Presentation Transcript

    • The Great Designers’ Storyboard The Great Depression UDL Bookbuilder
    • General InformationTitle of Book Music & Entertainment During The Great DepressionContent Area Social StudiesGenre Non-FictionGrade Level 9-12Coach 1Coach 2Coach 3
    • Coach Ideas I like the hat! sg
    • Another Coach Idea Just an idea for a coach..SG ----- I like this graphic. If we use I the others will need to be of a similar or complementary artistic style. Do you have a link from where you found this? -BS http://www.flickr.com/photos/manolo- lopez/153537123/sizes/m/in/photostream/I used Gimp to cut around it. SG
    • OverviewAmericans during the 1930s were facing many hardships during the Great Depression. They becamepoor due to the banking crisis and the shortage of jobs. Many families were left homeless. Childrenwere starving and malnourished. Countless Americans thought that their lives were ruined forever.The music and entertainment during this time were among the few outlets that gave people hope ofa better future.
    • Storyboard Information - OverviewPage Layout SelectionImages http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7112/7118448499_201c4c92dd.jpgAlt Text for Images Depression-era children holding picket signs saying, "Why cant you give my dad a job"Page Text Trebuchet MSFont Size 14Font Color BlackAudio or VideoText for Coach 1 Why were Americans depressed during the Great Depression?Text for Coach 2 Did you know (trivia here) In 1933, 100,000 Americans applied for visas to emigrate to the Soviet Union in search of better work opportunities.Text for Coach 3Student ResponseAssessment NotesOther Comments
    • Low Cost EntertainmentEven though times were hard and money was scarce, families found time to have funwith each other, friends and neighbors. Board games such as "Monopoly" and"Scrabble" were first sold during the 1930s. Neighbors also got together to play cardgames such as Whist, Pinochle, Canasta and Bridge. Playing cards, horseshoes, dominos, or putting together a complex puzzle with hundreds of pieces helped families pass the time.
    • Storyboard Information - Low Cost EntertainmentPage Layout SelectionImages Monopoly PhotosAlt Text for Images A full view of a handmade Monopoly game from 1933 A zoomed view of the handmade Monopoly gamePage Text Trebuchet MSFont Size 14Font Color BlackAudio or VideoText for Coach 1Text for Coach 2Text for Coach 3Student ResponseAssessment NotesOther Comments
    • Music The Great Depression marked a change in popular musical styles. Songwriters wrote music thatidentified with the mood of the times or sought to keep peoples minds off their hardships. The song,"Brother, Can You Spare a Dime" is considered the anthem of the Great Depression because of itshonest portrayal of the difficulties faced by the average American.Listen or read more about the song in this NPR story: A Depression-Era Anthem for Our Times"http://pd.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/specialmusic/2009/10/20091022_specialmusic_brother.mp3"Brother Can You Spare a Dime?"http://pd.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/specialmusic/2009/10/20091022_specialmusic_lifeisjustabowlofcherries3.mp3"Life is Just a Bowl of Cherries
    • Storyboard Information - Music 1Page Layout SelectionImages http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2552/4174762265_d696451a61.jpgAlt Text for ImagesPage Text Trebuchet MSFont Size 14Font Color BlackAudio or Video Songs: Brother, Can You Spare Me a Dime, Life is Like a Bowl of Cherries; NPR StoryText for Coach 1 What did the lyrics of the 1930s music reveal about life during this time?Text for Coach 2Text for Coach 3 According to the NPR story, "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" still resonates with people. Why do you think this song is still seen as relevant in todays world?Student ResponseAssessment Notes
    • Music: Blues and JazzSomber blues and confessional ballads became verypopular during the 1930s lamenting the tough times,but musicians such as Duke Ellington, FletcherHenderson, and Count Basie were still very influentialduring the Great Depression with their complex andexhilarated forms of jazz. Chasing the Depressionblues away with music was far more common thancelebrating its woes. Click on the picture for a link to music...
    • Storyboard Information -Music Blues and JazzPage Layout Selection Title, Graphic, Text BoxImages http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4071/4509996700_a529985247.jpgAlt Text for Images Band members playing jazz.Page Text Trebuchet MSFont Size 14Font Color BlackAudio or VideoText for Coach 1Text for Coach 2Text for Coach 3 The self evaluation could be based on the students impressions after listening to the snip.Student ResponseAssessment NotesOther Comments
    • Woody Guthrie - Influential Depression Era MusicianWoody Guthrie was born in 1912 in Okamah, Oklahoma. In 1935 he experienced Black Sunday, the worst dust storm of the decade resulting in a "Dust Bowl" that killed crops and devastated farms in Oklahoma and Arkansas. The Dust Bowl greatly worsened life for people who were already suffering from the Great Depression. Like so many others in the Dust Bowl, Guthrie was unable to make a living. He left his wife, three children and his first band to look for work in California. While hitchhiking he wrote folk songs about the dust bowl, migrant workers, corrupt politicians and union organizing. His song Talking Dust Bowl Blues (lyrics) provides a glimpse into farm life before and after the Dust Bowl."This Land is Your Land" is probably the best-known song written by Woody Guthrie."A folk song is what’s wrong and how to fix it or it could be who’s hungry and where their mouth is or who’s out of work and where the job is or who’s broke and where the money is or who’s carrying a gun and where the peace is."Woody Guthrie http://www.woodyguthrie.org/
    • Storyboard Information - Music Woody GuthriePage Layout Selection Title, Graphic, Text BoxImages http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQUbkp2DDAmMO1UtY- XHqglRJTEyqGRUq5wFmm1uy2tdDhjnTBHAlt Text for Images Woody GuthriePage Text Trebuchet MSFont Size 14Font Color BlackAudio or Video "This Land Is Your Land" Video, "Talking Dust Bowl Blues" VideoText for Coach 1Text for Coach 2Text for Coach 3 Students could compare these songs to a contemporary song. OR they could update the lyrics to one stanza in their own words (to the same tune) OR they could perform the song as a rap OR they could write their own folk song verse based on the quote from WG OR they could find a contemporary song that fits WGs definition of a folk songStudent ResponseAssessment Notes
    • Dance● Dance● Dance Marathons, an American phenomenon of the 1920s and 1930s, were human endurance contests in which couples danced almost non-stop for hundreds of hours (as long as a month or two), competing for prize money. They continued into the 1930s. They were said to mirror the marathon of desperation Americans underwent during the Great Depression. They were also an escape of the harsh realities of daily life."You cant be sad and dance at the same time."
    • Storyboard Information - DancePage Layout SelectionImages http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6104/6350758395_e684305f78.jpgAlt Text for ImagesPage Text Trebuchet MSFont Size 14Font Color BlackAudio or VideoText for Coach 1Text for Coach 2Text for Coach 3 They Shoot Horses, Dont They? (1969) This movie reveals some of the desperate acts people during the Great Depression endured (marathon dances) in order obtain money.Student ResponseAssessment Notes
    • Storyboard Information - Movies 1Page Layout SelectionImagesAlt Text for ImagesPage TextFont SizeFont ColorAudio or VideoText for Coach 1Text for Coach 2Text for Coach 3Student ResponseAssessment NotesOther Comments
    • Popular Movie Stars of the 1930’sMovies provided an escape from the daily hardships Potential self- evaluationof the Great Depression. They allowed a peek intothe lives of high society. Who would you consider to be the most popular movie stars today?Not only were people fascinated by the movies Are they comedians? Singers?themselves, they wanted to know all about theglamorous lives of the actors who starred in them. Dancers?People particularly loved movies starring the In respect to movie roles andhandsome Clark Gable, mysterious Bette Davis, public persona, identify a few ofsexy Greta Garbo, swashbuckling Errol Flynn, todays stars and described theirdangerous Humphrey Bogart, and precocious similarities and differences to thoseShirley Temple. listed from the 1930s.Musicals starring the elegant dance team of Fred Internet sites and entertainmentAstaire and Ginger Rogers were also favorites. journalists provide anW.C. Fields, Bob Hope and the Marx Brothers unprecedented amount ofmade comedic films which made people laugh information about the private life ofand forget their difficulties. movie stars.In 1937, Walt Disney released "Snow White"which was the first full-length animated movie.
    • Storyboard Information - Movies 2Page Layout SelectionImagesAlt Text for ImagesPage TextFont SizeFont ColorAudio or VideoText for Coach 1Text for Coach 2Text for Coach 3Student ResponseAssessment NotesOther Comments
    • Horror Movies of the 1930s"...of all of the types of films, horror films are the greatest reflection of modern culture. The hopes andfears of society are displayed in full motion in the horror films of the day." L. Vincent Poupard During the Great Depression many immigrants that came to America worried that perhaps they had made a mistake. On the other hand, many citizens of the United States believed that some of the problems the country was facing were directly caused by the large number of people from "The Old Country" immigrating into the US. Universal Studios produced numerous horror films during the 1930s, believing that watching them would provide the masses a way to release their inner fears. Dracula (1931), Frankenstein (1931), The Mummy (1932), The Bride of Frankenstein (1935), Draculas Daughter (1936), Son of Frankenstein (1939), and The Wolf Man (1941) all had common themes. Providing more than a simple distraction from the horrors of life during the Depression era, these movies reflect the hopes, dreams, and fears of Americans during this most difficult time. The monster that reinforced the fears of a generation. Credit: Universal Studios Good Copyright: Public Stuff!
    • Storyboard Information -Page Layout SelectionImagesAlt Text for ImagesPage TextFont SizeFont ColorAudio or VideoText for Coach 1Text for Coach 2Text for Coach 3Student ResponseAssessment NotesOther Comments
    • if more of this text is used, must be paraphrased and condensed. Perhaps a trailer of a horror film (or 2)can be embedded? -BSAll of the creatures from these horror movies have links to, "The Old Country." For those people that argued that theperils of the day came from the immigrants, they had an argument that was displayed in front of them on the screen. Thecreatures that these films portrayed reinforced the fears that these Americans had.Dracula immigrated to America from Western Europe. The Wolf Man had a curse that was believed to be common inWestern Europe. The Mummy was a curse that was born in Northern Africa. Frankenstein was a monster that was createdfrom a madness that was in central Europe.The immigrants who had come to this country were able to relate to these horror movies since they were based on oldbeliefs and superstitions that they had grown up with. These films gave them a reminder of where it was that they hadcome from, and where many of them longed to return. ------Not sure I agree with the content that follows.... thoughts? --- Maybe the last paragraphFor some, this reminder of the fears and superstitions that had been left behind made them realize that it was good that they hadcome to America. These horror films made them understand why they had left Europe in the first place, and come to a land thatwas more realistic and reasonable.For some people in the United States, these horror films brought another message. Many people fear that one day they will come tothe realization that their parents were right about something. Finding out that the old superstitions that were held by their parentscould be a major wakeup call for many people. These horror movies reinforced this fear.When Universal Studios first created these movies, they had no idea how many levels of messages were encased in these movies.They wanted to make horror films that were a distraction for people from the real life horrors of the day. They never realized thatthey were sending different messages to different people.That, though, is what many horror movies do. They speak to what is going on in the world at the time. By relating to what peoplefear, horror films also relate to their dreams and hopes. These relations are what can tell us a lot about the people that arewatching these horror films at the time. These relations explain history in a completely different capacity then we are used to.
    • Storyboard Information -Page Layout SelectionImagesAlt Text for ImagesPage TextFont SizeFont ColorAudio or VideoText for Coach 1Text for Coach 2Text for Coach 3Student ResponseAssessment NotesOther Comments
    • Comedies / Romantic Comedies of the 1930sCharlie ChaplainIt Happened One Night, 5 x Oscar winner - verbal sparring between Clark Gable and ?
    • Storyboard Information -Page Layout SelectionImagesAlt Text for ImagesPage TextFont SizeFont ColorAudio or VideoText for Coach 1Text for Coach 2Text for Coach 3Student ResponseAssessment NotesOther Comments
    • Musicals of the 1930sDepression era musicals often included themes of the unemployed or "down and out " making it big. The video clip above is from "Gold Diggers of 1933". Listen to the lyrics of "Were in the Money."
    • Storyboard Information -Page Layout SelectionImagesAlt Text for ImagesPage TextFont SizeFont ColorAudio or VideoText for Coach 1Text for Coach 2Text for Coach 3Student ResponseAssessment NotesOther Comments
    • The Dependence on RadioRadio was the nations first mass medium.It linked the country and ended the isolation of rural residents.Radio was so important that the 1930 Census asked if the household had a radio.Radio provided free entertainment and connected country people to world events.If used, needs para-phrasing/re-writinghttp://www.flickr. com/photos/24736216@N07/7494931108/sizes/m/in/photostream/During the Great Depression, the significance of the radio for rural families grew despite the lean conditions. Families struck with poverty would rather choose to give up an icebox or a bed before they would part with their radios. The radios symbolized lifelines to the outside world.
    • Storyboard Information - Radio 1Page Layout SelectionImagesAlt Text for ImagesPage TextFont SizeFont ColorAudio or VideoText for Coach 1Text for Coach 2 Did you know...By the end of 1932, 30-45 million people listened to Father Charles Coughlins radio program every weekText for Coach 3Student ResponseAssessment NotesOther Comments
    • Popular Radio Broadcasts During the DepressionFamilies laughed at comedians Jack Benny, Fred Allen, George Burns and Gracie Allen, Amos and Andy, and Fibber McGee and Molly.Radio featured daytime soap operas.In the evening, people listened to the Lone Ranger, the Green Hornet, The Shadow, and Jack Armstrong.Singers Bing Crosby and the Mills Brothers, as well as Guy Lombardos orchestra and the Grand Ole Opry were popular.Families listened to baseball, cheering for stars like Lou Gehrig and Joe DiMaggio.Nearly 40 million people listened to the horserace between Seabiscuit and War Admiral in Maryland.In news coverage, the German airship Hindenburg caught fire in 1937 as it landed in New Jersey. Thousands of people across the country heard Herb Morrison describe the terrifying scene on live radio, saying "Oh the humanity!"Orson Welles broadcasted "War of the Worlds," a radio play about Martians landing on Earth. Millions of people didnt understand that the story was fiction. They panicked and tried to leave town. Is this(Verbatim, needs re-writing)__________________________________________________________________________ Ok so far? If so, I willRadio broadcasts helped Americans cope with the tough times allowing them to laugh at continuecomedians such as Jack Benny, Fred Allen, George Burns and Gracie Allen. The radio also gave rewritingthem a way to escape their reality by living the lives of soap opera characters and brave men such .sgas the Lone Ranger and Green Hornet.Nothing beats the blues like music. The radio provided this for many Americans. They listened toBing Crosby and the Mills Brothers as well as Guy Lombardos orchestra and the Grand Ole Opry.Families that could not afford the costs of attending baseball games could now listen live to
    • Storyboard Information - Radio 1Page Layout SelectionImagesAlt Text for ImagesPage TextFont SizeFont ColorAudio or VideoText for Coach 1Text for Coach 2Text for Coach 3Student ResponseAssessment NotesOther Comments
    • Comics
    • Storyboard Information - Comics 1Page Layout SelectionImages http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a2/Skyrocket_steele.jpg http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a0/JumboComics1.jpgAlt Text for ImagesPage TextFont SizeFont ColorAudio or VideoText for Coach 1Text for Coach 2Text for Coach 3Student ResponseAssessment NotesOther Comments
    • Will need to review Marys content to add specifics to these. Books/Novels - Grapes of Wrath, Popular games (horseshoes, Board Games, dominos, Baseball, etc.? ) Magazines - While the 1930s were difficult for many businesses, magazine publishing flourished! From the movie star rags to the more respectable editorial magazines, the wide range of content appealed to Americans who wanted to read about or distract themselves from their current hardships. Already established, pre-depression era magazines such as the Saturday Evening Post, Time, and Readers Digest continued to sell well. Many others with very focused content, such as Modern Screen and Fortune were launched and succeeded as well. Though the Depression wouldnt appear to be the best time to start a new business, many magazines that originated during that time have lasted.
    • Storyboard Information -Page Layout SelectionImages Down Beat - http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn: ANd9GcSJ_MMWhOPNiIPhqKKVekGCb7nyw0aKwwZj65yGFd36RIRr4HWkPw Silver Screen - http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn: ANd9GcTub0UVmKBJPDx7aiKMgaJgAVpfZ7oOQikxXEs0xxqm2GKwaN3k McCalls - http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRL- 0G7kti96p5LpCx6wugGSofcaVJPDYKX04lXbg4HQN0ULbDB6g Time - http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn: ANd9GcTONvyiwItJcIgBy0meyidBF9CT7_qP8tmpzqT8cVUbxbPLQbACAlt Text for ImagesPage TextFont SizeFont ColorAudio or VideoText for Coach 1Text for Coach 2Text for Coach 3Student Response