GMDSS IMO HANDBOOK 2001
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

GMDSS IMO HANDBOOK 2001

on

  • 3,286 views

GMDSS IMO HANDBOOK 2001

GMDSS IMO HANDBOOK 2001

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,286
Views on SlideShare
3,286
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
117
Comments
1

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • je trouve ce site très intéressant.
    merci à vous tous
    idir
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

GMDSS IMO HANDBOOK 2001 GMDSS IMO HANDBOOK 2001 Presentation Transcript

  • GMDSS ^ ^ ^ ^ HandbookHandbook on the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System 3rd Edition, 2001 This Handbook is not to be considered as a replacement or substitute for the ITU ‘‘Manual for Use by the Maritime Mobile and Maritime Mobile-Satellite Services’’ or any other publication required to be carried on board a ship by the Radio Regulations or any other international convention. B IMO London, 2001
  • First published in 1992 by the INTERNATIONAL MARITIME ORGANIZATION 4 Albert Embankment, London SE1 7SR Printed by the International Maritime Organization, London Second edition 1995 Third edition 2001 2 4 6 8 10 9 7 5 3 1 ISBN 92-801-5098-7 Sales number: IMO-970E Copyright # IMO 2001 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may, for sales purposes, be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, electrostatic, magnetic tape, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise, without prior permission in writing from the International Maritime OrganizationNOTE: ITU materials included in this publication have been reproduced, with the priorauthorization of the publishers, from the following ITU publications: ITU-R Recommenda-tions, 1997 M Series, Volumes 3, 4 and 5; Radio Regulations (Edition of 1998); and FinalActs of WARC–Mob–83, WARC–Mob–87, WRC–95, WRC–97 and WRC–2000. Thesepublications can be ordered directly from the International Telecommunication Union,Sales and Marketing Service, Place des Nations, CH–1211 Geneva 20, Switzerland. Photos in this publication were kindly made available by the International Mobile Sa-tellite Organization, COSPAS–SARSAT, the International Radio-Maritime Committee, andthe Japan Maritime Safety Agency.
  • ForewordSince its establishment in 1959, the International Maritime Organization and its Member Governments, in closeco-operation with the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and with other international organiza-tions, notably the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the International Hydrographic Organization(IHO) and the International Mobile Satellite Organization (Inmarsat), and with the COSPAS–SARSAT partners,have striven to improve maritime distress and safety radiocommunications.The culmination of this work was the entry into force and implementation of the global maritime distress andsafety system (GMDSS) in February 1999.The intent of this Handbook is to provide in a single comprehensive publication an explanation of the principlesupon which the GMDSS is based, the radiocommunication requirements and recommendations for its im-plementation, the operational performance standards and technical specifications to be met by GMDSS equip-ment, and the procedures for and method of operation of the various radio services which form the GMDSS andthe Master Plan for the GMDSS.Regulations cited in the text are taken from the 1988 (GMDSS) amendments to the International Convention forthe Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended. NoteEvery effort has been made to ensure that the material in this publication is accurate and up to date, but a certaindegree of obsolescence is inevitable. Most of the texts in this publication are up to date as of July 2000, but in caseof doubt or uncertainty about the material, readers should contact their national maritime Administrations or theInternational Maritime Organization for guidance.
  • GMDSS Handbook Page v Contents PageAbbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viiPart 1 – Introduction1.1 History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.2 The old system and the need for improvement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2Part 2 – Basic concept of the GMDSS2.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32.2 Communications functions in the GMDSS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Alerting SAR co-ordinating communications On-scene communications Locating Promulgation of maritime safety information General radiocommunications Bridge-to-bridge communicationsPart 3 – Communications systems in the GMDSS3.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Satellite communications Terrestrial communications Frequencies used in the GMDSS3.2 Inmarsat system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Introduction Space segment Coast earth stations Ship earth stations Inmarsat services3.3 COSPAS–SARSAT system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Introduction General concept of the system Coverage modes 121.5 MHz satellite EPIRBs 406 MHz satellite EPIRBs Space segment Local user terminals and mission control centres System performance and operations  >>>
  • Page vi GMDSS Handbook3.4 Digital selective calling system. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Introduction Basic description of DSC3.5 Search and rescue radar transponders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Introduction Operational and technical characteristics3.6 Equipment performance standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283.7 Maritime safety information system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Introduction The International NAVTEX system Enhanced group call systemPart 4 – GMDSS equipment carriage requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32Part 5 – Operational procedures for the GMDSS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34Part 6 – Shore-based SAR communication network and operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35Part 7 – Master Plan for the GMDSS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37Part 8 – Maintenance of equipment in the GMDSS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38Annex 1 – Amendments to the 1974 SOLAS Convention concerning radiocommunications for the GMDSS and Conference resolutionsAnnex 2 – IMO Assembly and MSC resolutions relevant to the GMDSSAnnex 3 – GMDSS radio equipment (IMO performance standards and related ITU-R recommendations)Annex 4 – Maritime safety informationAnnex 5 – Master Plan for the GMDSSAnnex 6 – COSPAS–SARSAT system dataAnnex 7 – MSC Circulars relevant to the GMDSSAnnex 8 – COM and COMSAR Circulars relevant to the GMDSSAnnex 9 – Articles and appendices of the Radio Regulations relevant to the GMDSSAnnex 10 – WARC-Mob-83, WARC-Mob-87, WRC-95, WRC-97 and WRC-2000 Resolutions and RecommendationsAnnex 11 – Resolutions of the 1979 SAR Conference relevant to the GMDSS
  • GMDSS Handbook Page vii AbbreviationsIn addition to standard SI units, the following abbreviations are used in this publication: ADE above-deck equipment ALC automatic level control BDE below-deck equipment CCIR International Radio Consultative Committee CES coast earth station CMC COSPAS mission control centre (Moscow) COSPAS Space System for Search of Distress Vessels CSS co-ordinator surface search DMG distress message generator DSC digital selective calling EGC enhanced group call ELT emergency locator transmitter EPIRB emergency position-indicating radio beacon GMDSS global maritime distress and safety system HF high frequency ICAO International Civil Aviation Organization IF intermediate frequency IFRB International Frequency Registration Board IHO International Hydrographic Organization IMO International Maritime Organization Inmarsat International Mobile Satellite Organization ITU International Telecommunication Union ITU-R ITU Radiocommunication Sector (former CCIR) ITU-T ITU Telecommunication Standardization Sector (former CCITT) LCD liquid-crystal display LUT local user terminal MCC mission control centre MF medium frequency MSI maritime safety information NBDP narrow-band direct printing (telegraphy) NCC network control centre NCS network co-ordination station OCC operations control centre OSC on-scene commander PLB personal locator beacon RCC rescue co-ordination centre RF radio-frequency RR Radio Regulations RSC rescue sub-centre SAR search and rescue SAR Convention International Convention on Maritime Search and Rescue, 1979 SARSAT Search and Rescue Satellite-Aided Tracking SART search and rescue radar transponder SES ship earth station SOLAS International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended VDU visual display unit VHF very high frequency VTS vessel tracking system WARC World Administrative Radio Conference WMO World Meteorological Organization WRC World Radiocommunication Conference WWNWS World-Wide Navigational Warning Service
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 1 Page 1 Part 1 Introduction1.1 HistorySince its establishment in 1959, the International Maritime Organization (IMO), in its efforts to enhance safety atsea by the adoption of the highest practicable standards, has sought to improve the radiocommunication pro-visions of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) and to exploit the advances made inradiocommunication technology.The shipborne radiocommunication equipment prescribed by the 1960 and 1974 SOLAS Conventions consistedof radiotelegraph equipment for passenger ships of all sizes and cargo ships of 1,600 tons gross tonnage andupwards, as well as radiotelephone equipment for cargo ships of 300 to 1,600 tons gross tonnage. The ships sofitted, although they could receive a distress alert, could not communicate with each other, and it was not until1984 that all ships were required to be able to communicate by means of VHF and MF radiotelephone. The rangeof transmission on MF was only 150 miles, so for ships beyond this distance from the nearest coast station, the oldsystem is essentially a ship-to-ship distress system.In 1972, with the assistance of the International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR), IMO commenced astudy of maritime satellite communications which resulted in the establishment, in 1979, of the Inmarsat or-ganization, thus making available to shipping an international satellite communications system.In 1973, through Assembly resolution A.283(VIII), IMO reviewed its policy on the development of the maritimedistress system so as to incorporate satellite communications and foresaw the possibility of automatic alerting andtransmission of maritime distress and safety information.In 1979 the International Conference on Maritime Search and Rescue adopted the International Convention onMaritime Search and Rescue, 1979 (1979 SAR Convention), the ultimate objective of which is to establish aglobal plan for maritime search and rescue (SAR) on a framework of multilateral or bilateral agreements betweenneighbouring states on the provision of SAR services in coastal and adjacent ocean waters to achieve co-operationand mutual support in responding to distress incidents. The Conference also invited IMO to develop a globalmaritime distress and safety system, including telecommunication provisions, for the effective operation of thesearch and rescue plan prescribed in the 1979 SAR Convention.*The IMO Assembly, at its eleventh session in 1979, considered the existing arrangements for maritime distressand safety communications and decided that a new global maritime distress and safety system should be estab-lished to improve distress and safety radiocommunications and procedures. In conjunction with a co-ordinatedsearch and rescue infrastructure, it would incorporate recent technical developments and significantly improve thesafety of life at sea.With the assistance of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), CCIR, other international organi-zations, notably the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the International Hydrographic Organization(IHO), Inmarsat, and the COSPAS–SARSAT partners, IMO developed and proved the various equipment andtechniques used in the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS). The ITU also established theappropriate regulatory framework for the implementation of the GMDSS.The 1983 and 1987 World Administrative Radio Conferences for the Mobile Services (WARC Mob-83 and-87) and WARC-92 adopted amendments to the ITU Radio Regulations which prescribe the frequencies,operational procedures and radio personnel for the GMDSS.In 1988, the Conference of Contracting Governments to the 1974 SOLAS Convention on the Global MaritimeDistress and Safety System (GMDSS Conference) adopted amendments to the 1974 SOLAS Convention con-cerning radiocommunications for the GMDSS, together with several relevant resolutions. These amendmentsentered into force on 1 February 1992, and the GMDSS was fully implemented on 1 February 1999.* See annex 11-2.
  • Page 2 GMDSS Handbook – Part 11.2 The old system and the need for improvementThe old maritime distress and safety system, as defined in chapter IV of the 1974 SOLAS Convention in forceprior to 1 February 1992, was based on the requirements that certain classes of ships, when at sea, keep con-tinuous radio watch on the international distress frequencies assigned in accordance with the ITU Radio Reg-ulations and carry radio equipment capable of transmitting over a minimum specified range. The master of anyship at sea should, on receiving a signal that a ship, aircraft or survival craft is in distress, proceed with all speed tothe assistance of the persons in distress, informing them that he is doing so. Since the minimum specified range ofcommunications provided by the required shipborne equipment is 100–150 nautical miles, assistance to a ship indistress could generally only be rendered by other shipping in the vicinity of an incident, which means that the oldsystem is primarily intended for ship-to-ship operation. However, in accordance with the ITU Radio Regula-tions, coast stations generally maintain a continuous watch during their service hours on the distress frequencies.The old system includes two major manually operated subsystems: . The Morse telegraphy system on 500 kHz for all cargo ships of 1,600 tons gross tonnage and over and all passenger ships. Since Morse competence is essential to the operation of this system, a Morse- qualified radio officer is required on all ships having radiotelegraph installation. . The radiotelephony system on 2182 kHz and 156.8 MHz for all cargo ships of 300 tons gross tonnage and over and all passenger ships, which provides common distress communications for all ships subject to the 1974 SOLAS Convention.It has proved difficult to make any significant progress in the communication arrangements for a ship in distresswhen it is beyond the range of MF coast radio stations, although various measures have been implemented toimprove the situation.The introduction of modern technology, including satellite and digital selective calling techniques, enables adistress alert to be transmitted and received automatically over long range with a significantly higher reliability.
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 2 Page 3 Part 2 Basic concept of the GMDSS2.1 General2.1.1 The basic concept of the GMDSS (shown in figure 1) is that search and rescue authorities ashore, as wellas shipping in the immediate vicinity of the ship in distress, will be rapidly alerted to a distress incident so that theycan assist in a co-ordinated SAR operation with the minimum delay. The system also provides for urgency andsafety communications and the promulgation of maritime safety information (MSI) – navigational and meteor-ological warnings and forecasts and other urgent safety information to ships. In other words, every ship is able,irrespective of the area in which it operates, to perform those communication functions which are essential for thesafety of the ship itself and of other ships operating in the same area. Figure 1 – General concept of the GMDSS
  • Page 4 GMDSS Handbook – Part 2
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 2 Page 5
  • Page 6 GMDSS Handbook – Part 2
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 2 Page 72.1.2 Recognizing that the different radio subsystems incorporated in the GMDSS system have individuallimitations with respect to the geographical coverage and services provided, the equipment required to be carriedby a ship is determined in principle by the ship’s area of operation, which is designated as follows (regulation IV/2.1.12–2.1.15): . Sea area A1 – an area within the radiotelephone coverage of at least one VHF coast station in which continuous digital selective calling (DSC) alerting is available, as may be defined by a Contracting Government; . Sea area A2 – an area, excluding sea area A1, within the radiotelephone coverage of at least one MF coast station in which continuous DSC alerting is available, as may be defined by a Contracting Government; . Sea area A3 – an area, excluding sea areas A1 and A2, within the coverage of an Inmarsat geo- stationary satellite in which continuous alerting is available; and . Sea area A4 – an area outside sea areas A1, A2 and A3.In all areas of operation, the continuous availability of alerting is required. Criteria for establishing those GMDSSsea areas are given in annex 2-16.2.2 Communications functions in the GMDSSThe GMDSS comprises the following communications functions as required by regulation IV/4. These functionsare individually performed by the radio subsystems set out in part 3.Alerting (regulation IV/4.1.1–4.1.3)2.2.1 Distress alerting is the rapid and successful reporting of a distress incident to a unit which can provide orco-ordinate assistance, as prescribed in RR N3112* This would be a rescue co-ordination centre (RCC) oranother ship in the vicinity. When an alert is received by an RCC, normally via a coast station or coast earthstation, the RCC will relay the alert to SAR units and to ships in the vicinity of the distress incident. A distressalert should indicate the ship’s identification and the position of the distress and, where practicable, its nature andother information which could be used for rescue operations (RR N3113*).2.2.2 The communication arrangements under the GMDSS are designed to enable distress alerting to beperformed in all three directions – ship-to-shore, ship-to-ship and shore-to-ship – in all sea areas (regulation IV/4.1.1–4.1.3). The alerting function is based on both satellite and terrestrial means and the initial distress alert isprimarily transmitted in the ship-to-shore direction. When the distress alert is transmitted by DSC on VHF, MFor HF, ships within DSC range of the ship in distress will also be alerted (ship-to-ship alerting).2.2.3 A distress alert is normally initiated manually and all distress alerts are acknowledged manually. When aship sinks, a float-free satellite emergency position-indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) is automatically activated.Ships operating exclusively in sea area A1 may, in lieu of satellite EPIRBs, use VHF EPIRBs on channel 70.2.2.4 The relaying of a distress alert from an RCC to ships in the vicinity of a distress incident is made bysatellite communication or by terrestrial communication, using appropriate frequencies. In either case, to avoid allships in a large sea area being alerted, an ‘‘area call’’ is normally transmitted so that only those ships in the vicinityof the distress incident are alerted. On receipt of a relayed distress alert, ships in the area addressed are required toestablish communication with the RCC concerned to enable the assistance to be co-ordinated. Parts 5 and 6 dealwith the operational procedure and routeing of the distress alert.SAR co-ordinating communications (regulation IV/4.1.4)2.2.5 In general, these are the communications necessary for the co-ordination of ships and aircraft participatingin a search and rescue operation following a distress alert and include communications between RCCs{ and any‘‘on-scene commander (OSC)’’{ or ‘‘co-ordinator surface search (CSS)’’{ in the area of the distress incident.* See annex 9-6.{ They are defined in the annex to the 1979 SAR Convention, chapter I, as amended.
  • Page 8 GMDSS Handbook – Part 22.2.6 For SAR operations, messages are transmitted in both directions, as distinct from ‘‘alerting’’, which isgenerally the transmission of a specific message in one direction only, and distress and safety traffic by radio-telephony and direct-printing telegraphy will normally be used for passing such messages.2.2.7 The techniques which are available for SAR co-ordinating communications are radiotelephony or direct-printing telegraphy or both. These communications can be carried out by terrestrial or satellite means, dependentupon the equipment fitted on the ship and the sea area in which the incident occurs.On-scene communications (regulation IV/4.1.5)2.2.8 On-scene communications normally take place in the MF and VHF bands on frequencies designated fordistress and safety traffic (given in annex 9-3), by radiotelephony or direct-printing telegraphy. These commu-nications between the ship in distress and assisting units relate to the provision of assistance to the ship or therescue of survivors. When aircraft are involved in on-scene communications they are normally able to use 3023,4125 and 5680 kHz. In addition, SAR aircraft can be provided with equipment to communicate on 2182 kHz or156.8 MHz or both, as well as on other maritime mobile frequencies.Locating (regulation IV/4.1.6)2.2.9 Locating is the finding of a ship/aircraft in distress or its survival craft or survivors, as defined by regulationIV/2.1.8. In the GMDSS this function is performed by means of 9 GHz SAR radar transponders (SARTs) carriedby the ship in distress or its survivors, whose position is indicated when the SART is interrogated by the searchingunit’s 9 GHz radar. Use of the frequency 121.5 MHz in most satellite EPIRBs is provided for homing byaeronautical SAR units.Promulgation of maritime safety information (MSI) (regulation IV/4.1.7)2.2.10 Ships need to be provided with up-to-date navigational warnings and meteorological warnings andforecasts and other urgent maritime safety information (MSI). MSI is made available by narrow-band direct-printing telegraphy broadcasts, using forward error correction, on the frequency 518 kHz (International NAV-TEX service – regulation 2.1.7) and, for ships which navigate beyond the NAVTEX coverage, by broadcasts viathe Inmarsat enhanced group call (EGC) system (known as the International SafetyNET system). A high-seasMSI broadcast system by HF direct-printing telegraphy is under development.* Details for MSI systems are givenin section 3.7.General radiocommunications (regulation IV/4.1.8)2.2.11 General radiocommunications in the GMDSS are those communications between ship stations andshore-based communication networks which concern the management and operation of the ship and may havean impact on its safety (regulation IV/2.1.5). These communications can be conducted on any appropriatechannel, including those used for public correspondence. Examples are orders for pilot and tug services, chartreplacement, repairs, etc.Bridge-to-bridge communications (regulation IV/4.1.9)2.2.12 Bridge-to-bridge communications are inter-ship safety communications conducted from the positionfrom which the ship is normally navigated (regulation IV/2.1.1), normally performed by VHF radiotelephony.* See regulation IV/7.1.5 and annex 2-12, paragraph 3.5 of this publication. See also annexes 3-5-3, 3-5-4 and 3-5-6.
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 3 Page 9 Part 3 Communications systems in the GMDSS3.1 GeneralSatellite communicationsSatellite communications are particularly important elements of the GMDSS.3.1.1 The Inmarsat system, which employs geostationary satellites and operates in the 1.5 and 1.6 GHz band (L-band), provides ships fitted with ship earth stations with a means of distress alerting and a capability for two-waycommunications using direct-printing telegraphy, data transmission and radiotelephone. L-Band satellite EPIRBsare also used for distress alerting. The International SafetyNET system is used as a main means to provide MSI toareas not covered by the International NAVTEX system.3.1.2 A polar-orbiting satellite system, operating in the 406 MHz band using satellite EPIRBs (COSPAS–SARSAT system), provides one of the main means of distress alerting and determining the identity and positionof the ship in distress or its survivors in the GMDSS.Terrestrial communications3.1.3 With terrestrial communications, DSC forms the basis of distress alerting and safety communications.Distress and safety communications following a DSC call can be performed by radiotelephony or direct-printingtelegraphy or both.Long-range service3.1.4 Use of HF provides a long-range service in both the ship-to-shore and shore-to-ship directions. In areascovered by Inmarsat it can be used as an alternative to satellite communications and outside these areas it providesthe only long-range communication capability. Frequencies have been designated in the 4, 6, 8, 12 and 16 MHzbands for this service.Medium-range service3.1.5 MF radiocommunications provide the medium-range service. In the ship-to-shore, ship-to-ship andshore-to-ship directions 2187.5 kHz is used for distress alerts and safety calls using DSC, and 2182 kHz is used fordistress and safety traffic by radiotelephony, including SAR co-ordinating and on-scene communications.2174.5 kHz is used for distress and safety traffic by direct-printing telegraphy.Short-range service3.1.6 VHF provides short-range service on the frequencies: . 156.525 MHz (channel 70) for distress alerts and safety calls using DSC, and . 156.8 MHz (channel 16) for distress and safety traffic by radiotelephony, including SAR co-ordinating and on-scene communications.There is no short-range direct-printing telegraphy service on VHF.Frequencies used in the GMDSS3.1.7 Frequencies used in the GMDSS communications systems allocated by ITU WARC Mob-87 are given inannex 9-3 (RR Art. N38).
  • Page 10 GMDSS Handbook – Part 33.2 Inmarsat systemIntroduction3.2.1 Inmarsat grew out of an idea that originated within IMO in 1966. Following extensive study by IMOexperts, an international conference was convened which, after three sessions, on 3 September 1976 unanimouslyadopted the Convention and Operating Agreement on the International Maritime Satellite Organization* (In-marsat). According to its Convention, Inmarsat is ‘‘to make provision for the space segment necessary forimproving maritime communications, thereby assisting in improving distress and safety of life at sea commu-nications’’.3.2.2 The Inmarsat system has three major components: the space segment provided by Inmarsat, the coast earthstations (CESs) provided by Inmarsat signatories and ship earth stations (SESs).3.2.3 The nerve centre of the system is the operations control centre (OCC), located at Inmarsat’s headquartersin the United Kingdom. The OCC is responsible for controlling the Inmarsat system operation as a whole.Operating 24 hours a day, it co-ordinates a wide range of activities. The OCC also arranges the commissioning ofSESs upon application by the shipowner.Space segment3.2.4 Four satellites in geostationary orbit 36,000 km above the equator cover four ocean regions, namelyAOR-E (Atlantic Ocean Region – East), AOR-W (Atlantic Ocean Region – West), IOR (Indian OceanRegion) and POR (Pacific Ocean Region), and provide near-global coverage. The current status of the Inmarsatsystem is given in annex 5 of the GMDSS Master Plan (see annex 5 of this publication).Coast earth stations3.2.5 The CESs provide the link between the satellites and terrestrial telecommunications networks. Currently,all CESs are owned and operated by telecommunications carriers. A typical CES consists of a parabolic antennaabout 11 m to 14 m in diameter, which is used for transmission of signals to the satellite at 6 GHz and forreception from the satellite at 4 GHz (figure 2). The same antenna or another dedicated antenna is used forL-band transmission (at 1.6 GHz) and reception (at 1.5 GHz) of network control signals. The type of com-munication service provided varies depending on the CES. A CES designated for each ocean area for each Figure 2 – Example of an Inmarsat coast earth station (The photo includes antennas other than Inmarsat)* The full name was amended to ‘‘International Mobile Satellite Organization’’ in December 1994, but the acronym ‘‘Inmarsat’’ is retained.
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 3 Page 11communication service (i.e. telephone, direct-printing telegraph, etc.) serves as a network co-ordination station(NCS) which assigns communication channels, on demand, to SESs and other CESs and monitors signalstransmitted by these stations.Ship earth stations3.2.6 The requirements for the SESs in the GMDSS can be met by Inmarsat SESs capable of two-way com-munications, such as Inmarsat-A, Inmarsat-B and Inmarsat-C SESs. Performance standards for SES equipmentare given in annex 3-4.Inmarsat-A SES3.2.7 An Inmarsat-A SES consists of two parts, above-deck equipment (ADE) and below-deck equipment(BDE) (figure 3). The ADE includes a parabolic antenna, about 0.85 m to 1.2 m in diameter, mounted on aplatform and stabilized so that the antenna remains pointed at the satellite regardless of ship motion. It alsoincludes a solid-state L-band power amplifier, an L-band low-noise amplifier, a diplexer and a low-loss protectiveradome. The BDE consists of an antenna control unit; communications electronics used for transmission,reception, access control and signalling; and telephone and telex equipment Figure 3 – Example of Inmarsat-A SES3.2.8 The new generation of Inmarsat-A equipment currently being produced by manufacturers is smaller andeasier to use than earlier models. ADE is now available weighing less than 50 kg, making it suitable for installationon most types and sizes of vessels and yachts. Many of the current systems are modular in design and allow theaddition of optional equipment such as facsimile, data and slow-scan television, etc. Some BDE has a micro-computer with a visual display unit (VDU), alphanumeric keyboard, hard-copy printer and modem. Thecomputer can be used to prepare telex messages with the ease of modern word-processing equipment. Messagescan be composed, edited and transmitted directly from the screen or stored for later transmission. In somemodels, the computer memorizes the satellite’s co-ordinates and CES tariffs and automatically routes the call inthe most economical way.3.2.9 With additional facilities, users have modified their terminals to allow automated vessel reporting. Thoseinvolved in vessel management on shore can dial the ship at any time of the day or night and automatically receiveinformation as to its position, heading, etc., as well as data on its cargo and operation – all without disturbing ordistracting the crew. A distress message generator is normally built into a terminal (mostly a software mod-ification) for storage of basic essential vessel information and automatic transmission in a distress situation.Inmarsat-B SES3.2.10 The Inmarsat-B SES is a digital complement of Inmarsat-A SES developed to replace Inmarsat-A SESequipment in the future. It provides the same communications services as an Inmarsat-A SES.
  • Page 12 GMDSS Handbook – Part 3Inmarsat-C SES3.2.11 Inmarsat-C SESs are small, lightweight terminals designed for two-way message communication (figure4). Inmarsat-C SESs cannot be used for radiotelephone communications; they operate at 600 bits/s and provideaccess to the international telex/teletex networks, electronic mail services and computer databases. This low-powered terminal with its omnidirectional antenna and light weight is a practical solution for installation on thesmallest of vessels, thereby bringing the benefits of satellite communications within the reach of all mariners. Itwill enlarge the user community by providing equal access to existing and emerging satellite services to allseafarers. Figure 4 – Example of Inmarsat-C SES3.2.12 Additionally, an Inmarsat-C SES can serve as a back-up for an Inmarsat-A SES on large ships and alsofulfill a potentially vital role as a fixed or portable transmitter/receiver for use on board ship or in survival craft.The omnidirectional antenna characteristics are particularly valuable for a vessel in distress as the SES continues tooperate even when the vessel is listing severely. As with the Inmarsat-A SES, a distress message generator can beincluded in the terminal software for storage of basic essential vessel information and automatic transmission in adistress situation.Enhanced group call receiver3.2.13 The Inmarsat EGC receiver is a dedicated piece of equipment for the reception of information byInmarsat EGC service. It has been designed to enable automatic continuous watch on International SafetyNETMSI broadcasts and commercial Inmarsat FleetNET messages, such as subscription to news services, etc. An EGCcapability can be added to Inmarsat-A, Inmarsat-B and Inmarsat-C SESs or it can be a stand-alone receiver withits own antenna. Annex 3-5-2 gives the performance standards for EGC receivers.3.2.14 An EGC receiver is required in the GMDSS for all ships which proceed beyond coverage of theInternational NAVTEX service (regulation IV/7.1.5).Inmarsat servicesShip-to-shore distress alerting3.2.15 The Inmarsat system provides priority access to satellite communications channels in emergency situ-ations. Each SES is capable of initiating a ‘‘request’’ message with distress priority (Inmarsat priority-3 call). Any‘‘request’’ message with a distress priority indication is automatically recognized at the CES and a satellite channelis instantly assigned. If all satellite channels happen to be busy, one of them will be pre-empted and allocated tothe SES which initiated the distress priority call. The processing of such calls is completely automatic and does notinvolve any human intervention. The CES personnel, however, are notified of the reception and passing throughof a distress priority message by audio-visual alarms.
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 3 Page 133.2.16 To ensure the correct treatment of distress priority requests, the NCS in each ocean region automaticallymonitors the processing of such calls by all other CESs in that region. In the event that any anomalies inprocessing are detected, the NCS will take appropriate action to establish the end-to-end connection. In addition,the monitoring NCS also checks the CES identity contained in the distress priority message and automaticallyaccepts the call if an identity of a non-operational CES has been detected (which may happen due to operatorerror aboard the vessel in distress).3.2.17 The distress priority applies not only with respect to satellite channels but also to the automatic routeingof the call to the appropriate RCC. Each CES in the system is required to provide reliable communicationinterconnection with an RCC; these national RCCs are known as associated RCCs. The means of CES–RCCinterconnection may vary from country to country and include the use of dedicated lines or public switchednetworks. Thus, any distress priority request message received at the CES is automatically processed and passed tothe associated RCC. Some CESs, due to national considerations, pass distress priority messages to specialoperators, who are responsible for the subsequent routeing of the call to the appropriate RCC, or provide anoption which allows the shipboard operator to contact any RCC when a satellite channel has been assigned onthe distress priority basis.3.2.18 The initiation of a distress priority message in most SESs is made simple for ship crew members byprovision of a ‘‘distress button’’ or code in the SES. On activation of this button, the equipment instantaneouslytransmits a distress priority message. This single operation, a push of the ‘‘distress button’’, provides automatic,direct and assured connection to a competent rescue authority, thereby avoiding the need for the SES operator toselect or key the telex or telephone number of the RCC and eliminating possible human error. The establishmentof this end-to-end connection, being completely automatic and on a priority basis, takes only a few seconds.3.2.19 Inmarsat has issued technical guidelines to manufacturers for a distress message generator (DMG), whichconsists of SES software to transmit automatically, after the connection has been established, the distress messagein a standardized format that provides information on the vessel’s identification, its position and the particularemergency.3.2.20 The procedure described above is the primary means of ship-to-shore distress alerting in the Inmarsatsystem. It should be noted, however, that Inmarsat SES-equipped ships can also contact any RCC of their choiceby following the calling procedure for routine calls. In this case, the complete international telephone/telexnumber has to be selected.3.2.21 A major benefit of the Inmarsat distress priority system is that it eliminates the need for dedicatedfrequencies to be allocated for distress and safety communications. Distress messages made through the Inmarsatdistress priority system are sent through the general communication channels on an absolute priority basis toensure an immediate connection.Shore-to-ship distress alerting3.2.22 Shore-to-ship alerting to groups of ships with Inmarsat-A, Inmarsat-B or Inmarsat-C SESs but withoutInternational SafetyNET capability can be performed in the following modes: .1 ‘‘All ships calls’’ – Calls to all ships in the ocean region concerned. It should be noted, however, that, due to the large coverage zones of geostationary satellites, such alerting is not very efficient, although it may be justified under exceptional circumstances; .2 ‘‘Geographical area calls’’ – Calls to ships navigating in a defined geographical area. Each satellite coverage region is subdivided into smaller areas, and the boundaries of these areas are based on NAVAREAs each having a unique two-digit area code.* SESs will automatically recognize and accept geographical area calls only if the correct code has been input by the SES operator; the system requires the periodic manual input of appropriate area codes; or .3 ‘‘Group calls to selected ships’’ – This service is provided by a number of CESs in the operator- assisted mode and allows alerting of a predetermined group of vessels. This service could be very useful for alerting, for example, SAR units.3.2.23 As long as they are not engaged in traffic, SESs accept all incoming messages without any differentiationof priority.* See annex 4-1 (WWNWS).
  • Page 14 GMDSS Handbook – Part 3Shore-to-ship distress alerting through the International SafetyNET system3.2.24 The EGC receiver can be an integral part of an SES or a completely separate unit, and it ensures a veryhigh probability of receiving shore-to-ship distress alert messages. When a distress priority message is received, anaudible alarm will sound and it can only be reset manually.3.2.25 Accessing the International SafetyNET service by RCCs requires arrangements similar to those neededfor shore-to-ship distress alerting to a standard SES. Those RCCs unable to obtain a reliable terrestrial connectionto a coast earth station can install an Inmarsat SES at the RCC. The RCC would then transmit the distress alertvia the SES to a CES, where it would be relayed by means of a broadcast over the International SafetyNETsystem. See section 3.7 and annex 4-3* for further details of the International SafetyNET system.Search and rescue co-ordinating communications3.2.26 For the co-ordination and control of SAR operations, RCCs require communications with the ship indistress as well as with units participating in the operation. The methods and modes of communication (ter-restrial, satellite, telephone, telex) used will be governed by the capabilities available on board the ship in distressas well as those on board assisting units. Where those ships are equipped with an SES, the advantages of theInmarsat system for rapid, reliable communications, including receipt of MSI, can be exploited.3.2.27 A reliable interlinking of RCCs is important for the GMDSS, in which a distress message may bereceived by an RCC thousands of miles away from where the assistance is needed and it may not be the RCCbest suited to provide the necessary assistance. In this case prompt relay of the distress message to the appropriateRCC is essential and any means of communication, whether land-lines, terrestrial radio networks or satellitelinks, must be used.3.2.28 To increase the speed and reliability of inter-RCC communications, some RCCs have installed SESsproviding them with the capability of communicating via the Inmarsat system.{ These facilities are useful forlong-distance interconnection of SAR organizations, especially when dedicated lines or public switched networksare unavailable or unreliable.On-scene SAR communications3.2.29 On-scene communications are those between the ship in distress and assisting vessels, and between SARvessels and the OSC or the CSS, and are normally short-range communications made on the VHF or MF distressand safety frequencies in the GMDSS. However, Inmarsat SES-fitted ships could, if necessary, use satellitecommunications as a supplement to their VHF and MF facilities.Promulgation of MSI (via International SafetyNET services)3.2.30 In the Inmarsat system, promulgation of MSI is performed by means of the International SafetyNETsystem. Although an Inmarsat-A, Inmarsat-B or Inmarsat-C SES can receive the SafetyNET broadcasts, ifuninterrupted receipt of important MSI is required when the SES is engaged for other communications, then it isessential to have a dedicated EGC reception capability for such broadcasts. Alternatively, an EGC receiver can beinstalled as a separate unit. Details of the International SafetyNET service are given in annex 4-3 (InternationalSafetyNET Manual).General radiocommunications3.2.31 The Inmarsat system provides ships at sea with the same types and quality of modern communications asare available ashore. The capability for direct-dial, automatic connection without delay, using high-quality multi-mode communications, is provided by SES. Teleprinters, VDUs and telephone sets, as well as facsimile machinesand data equipment, can serve as peripheral equipment to SESs.3.2.32 The quality and availability of general radiocommunications offered by the Inmarsat system permit aship’s master to rapidly consult and seek assistance on any matter, whether of a safety or commercial nature. High-quality general communications are therefore a valuable asset to safety at sea as well as to the efficient operation ofthe ship.* International SafetyNET Manual.{ See RR N2938 (annex 9-2).
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 3 Page 153.2.33 The following are examples of Inmarsat services: . Telephony . Direct-printing telegraphy . Data communications . Facsimile transmission . Slow-scan television . Automatic data collection from ships (see section 3.2.9)L-Band satellite EPIRBs (Inmarsat-E)3.2.34 L-Band satellite EPIRBs operating through the Inmarsat system can be used as a means of alerting byships operating in sea areas A1, A2 and A3 as an alternative to 406 MHz satellite EPIRBs, mentioned in section3.3.3.2.35 The basic concept of the Inmarsat L-band satellite EPIRB system is shown in figure 5. The distress signaltransmitted from the float-free satellite EPIRB on the dedicated channel in the 1.6 GHz frequency (L band) isrelayed by an Inmarsat satellite to CESs equipped with the appropriate receiver and processor equipment. 2001 JSIMS 28/1/01 Canio) 1 (Di United Ham 0 West United Manchester Receiver processor RCC Figure 5 – Basic concept of the L-band satellite EPIRB system3.2.36 The L-band satellite EPIRB provides for rapid distress alerting (in the order of 10 minutes with 1 Woutput power radiated by an EPIRB), coverage up to latitude 708N and 708S, 20 simultaneous alerts within a 10-minute time-frame and the possibility of manual or automatic entry and updating of position information to thesatellite EPIRB. The satellite EPIRB can be activated either manually or automatically, by floating free from thesinking ship.3.2.37 After activation, the satellite EPIRB transmits the distress message containing the ship station identity,position information and additional information which could be used to facilitate rescue. The transmission isrepeated on a pre-selected duty cycle. Additionally, unless an integrated electronic position-fixing device isincluded which provides position updates, a built-in 9 GHz SART is activated for locating purposes. Annexes3-3-4 and 3-3-5 give detailed technical characteristics of L-band satellite EPIRBs.3.2.38 After being relayed by the satellite, the distress signal is down-converted at the CES to the specifiedintermediate frequency to be transferred to the computer-aided multi-channel receiver for satellite EPIRBidentification and message decoding.
  • Page 16 GMDSS Handbook – Part 33.2.39 After the signal channels are identified, they are assigned to processor channels where the incomingsignal plus noise is superimposed in the memory. Having accomplished the necessary number of superpositions,which results in 2 to 3 dB improvement of signal-to-noise ratio for every frame, the memory is read out and theusual procedures, such as bit and frame synchronization, evaluation of the error-correcting code and the messageprint-out, are performed.3.2.40 The distress message is then forwarded to an associated RCC for appropriate action.3.3 COSPAS–SARSAT systemIntroduction3.3.1 The COSPAS–SARSAT* system is a satellite-aided SAR system designed to locate distress beaconstransmitting on the frequencies 121.5 MHz or 406 MHz.{ It is intended to serve all organizations in the worldwith responsibility for SAR operations whether a distress occurs at sea, in the air or on land.3.3.2 COSPAS–SARSAT is a joint international satellite-aided SAR system, established by organizations inCanada, France, the United States and the former USSR.{3.3.3 The COSPAS–SARSAT system has demonstrated that the detection and location of distress signals canbe facilitated by global monitoring based on low-altitude satellites in near-polar orbits. It has been used suc-cessfully in a large number of SAR operations world-wide.3.3.4 Unless, as an alternative, a ship is provided with an L-band satellite EPIRB, the carriage of a float-freesatellite EPIRB operating on the frequency 406 MHz in the COSPAS–SARSAT system is mandatory on allSOLAS ships (regulation IV/7.1.6.1).General concept of the system3.3.5 The basic COSPAS–SARSAT system concept is given in figure 6. There are at present three types ofsatellite beacons, namely emergency locator transmitters (ELTs) (airborne), EPIRBs (maritime) and personallocator beacons (PLBs) (on land). These beacons transmit signals that are detected by COSPAS–SARSAT polar-orbiting satellites equipped with suitable receivers/processors. The signals are then relayed to a ground receivingstation, called a local user terminal (LUT), which processes the signals to determine the beacon location. An alertis then relayed, together with location data and other information, via a mission control centre (MCC), either to anational RCC, to another MCC or to the appropriate SAR authority to initiate SAR activities.3.3.6 Doppler shift (using the relative motion between the satellite and the beacon) is used to locate the beacons.The carrier frequency transmitted by the beacon is reasonably stable during the period of mutual beacon–satellitevisibility. The frequencies currently in use are 121.5 MHz (international aeronautical emergency frequency) and406.025 MHz. The 406 MHz beacons are more sophisticated than the 121.5 MHz beacons because of theinclusion of identification codes in the messages, but complexity is kept to a minimum. To optimize Dopplerlocation, a low-altitude near-polar orbit is used.} The low altitude results in a low uplink power requirement, apronounced Doppler shift, and short intervals between successive passes. The near-polar orbit results in completeworld coverage over a period of time.3.3.7 The Doppler location concept provides two positions for each beacon: the true position and its mirrorimage relative to the satellite ground track. This ambiguity is resolved by calculations that take into account theearth’s rotation. If the beacon frequency stability is good enough, as with 406 MHz beacons which are designedfor this purpose, the true solution is determined over a single pass. In the case of 121.5 MHz beacons, theambiguity is resolved by the results of the second pass if the first attempt is unsuccessful. The improved per-formance of 406 MHz satellite EPIRBs is the reason these devices were selected for the GMDSS. The status ofthe COSPAS–SARSAT system is given in annex 6.* COSPAS: Space System for Search of Distress Vessels; SARSAT: Search and Rescue Satellite-Aided Tracking.{ Certain beacons also transmit on 243 MHz, but this signal is relayed only by SARSAT satellites and not all local user terminals are equipped with243 MHz receivers. This system, therefore, is not described in this publication, but it operates in the same manner as a 121.5 MHz system.{ Since 26 December 1991 the membership in IMO of the USSR and its participation in treaty instruments adopted under the auspices of IMO iscontinued by the Russian Federation.} The altitude of the COSPAS satellites’ orbit is approximately 1,000 km while that of SARSAT satellites is about 850 km.
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 3 Page 17 Satellite ELT Emergency locator transmitter EPIRB Emergency position-indicating radio beacon LUT Local user terminal MCC Mission control centre RCC Rescue co-ordination centre SAR Search and rescue PLB Personal locator beaconPLB SAR forces ELT EPIRB RCC MCC LUT Distressed vessels Figure 6 – Basic concept of the COSPAS–SARSAT system
  • Page 18 GMDSS Handbook – Part 3Coverage modes3.3.8 The COSPAS–SARSAT system implements two coverage modes for the detection and location ofbeacons, namely the real-time mode and the global coverage mode. Both the 121.5 and 406 MHz systems operatein the real-time mode, while only the 406 MHz system operates in the global coverage mode.121.5 MHz real-time mode3.3.9 In this mode, an LUT and EPIRBs must be in the same view of the satellite for the 121.5 MHz EPIRBsignal to be relayed by a repeater on board the satellite directly to the ground, where it is received and processed.For this reason, world-wide real-time mode coverage is unlikely to be achieved.406 MHz real-time mode3.3.10 Once the satellite receives the 406 MHz satellite EPIRB signals, the Doppler shift is measured and thebeacon digital data, which include ship’s identification, etc., are recovered from the beacon signal. This in-formation is time-tagged, formatted as digital data, and transferred to the downlink repeater for real-timetransmission to any LUT in the satellite’s view. The data are simultaneously stored in the on-board memory ofthe satellite for later transmission in the global coverage mode.406 MHz global coverage mode3.3.11 The 406 MHz system provides global coverage by storing data on board for later dumping and receptionby LUTs. Each satellite EPIRB can therefore be located by all operating LUTs.121.5 MHz satellite EPIRBs3.3.12 EPIRBs operating on 121.5 MHz are already in widespread use. They are used on board light aircraft andships and must meet national specifications based on International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards.The 121.5 MHz beacon signals also provide for homing by SAR units and overflight monitoring by aircraft.406 MHz satellite EPIRBs3.3.13 The development of 406 MHz satellite EPIRBs (figure 7) has been undertaken to overcome certainshortcomings of the 121.5 MHz system. The new EPIRBs were specifically designed for satellite detection andDoppler location and include the following features: . improved location accuracy and ambiguity resolution; . increased system capacity, i.e. a greater number of beacons transmitting simultaneously in the field of view of a satellite can be processed; . global coverage; . unique identification of each beacon; and . inclusion of distress information.Annexes 3-3-1 and 3-3-6 give technical details of the 406 MHz satellite EPIRBs.3.3.14 The 406 MHz satellite EPIRBs transmit a 5 W radio-frequency (RF) burst of approximately 0.5 sduration every 50 seconds. Improved frequency stability ensures improved location accuracy, while the high peakpower increases the probability of detection. The low duty cycle provides good multiple-access capability, with asystem capacity of 90 activated beacons simultaneously in view of the satellite, and low mean power consumption.3.3.15 An important feature of the new satellite EPIRBs is the inclusion of a digitally encoded message, whichmay provide such information as the country of origin of the unit in distress, identification of the vessel or aircraft,nature of distress and, in addition, for satellite EPIRBs coded in accordance with the maritime location protocol,*the ship’s position as determined by its navigation equipment.* See annex 3-3-6 (Recommendation ITU-R M.633).
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 3 Page 19 Figure 7 – Example of 406 MHz COSPAS–SARSAT satellite EPIRB3.3.16 Satellite EPIRBs are dual-frequency 121.5/406 MHz beacons. This enables suitably equipped SAR unitsto home in on the 121.5 MHz transmission and permits overflight monitoring by aircraft.3.3.17 Depending on the type of beacon (maritime, airborne or land), beacons can be activated either manuallyor automatically.Space segment3.3.18 The SAR instrumentation on board the COSPAS and SARSAT satellites operates in the followingmodes: . real-time mode: 121.5 MHz repeater; . real-time mode: 406.025 MHz data processing and downlink; and . global coverage mode: 406.025 MHz stored data transmission.3.3.19 The equipment on board the satellite consists of the following basic sub-assemblies: . 121.5 MHz receiver; . 406.025 MHz receiver/processor and memory unit; and . 1544.5 MHz downlink transmitter.121.5 MHz receiver3.3.20 This unit has a bandwidth of 25 kHz. Automatic level control (ALC) is provided to maintain a constantoutput level.406.025 MHz receiver/processor3.3.21 The functions of the receiver/processor are as follows: . demodulating the digital messages received from beacons; . measuring the received frequency; and . time-tagging the measurement.
  • Page 20 GMDSS Handbook – Part 3All these data included in the output signal frame are modulated for downlinking to LUTs. The signal frame istransmitted at 2,400 bits/second in the real-time mode and also stored in memory for later transmission by theglobal coverage mode. In the global coverage mode, the on-board memory is dumped in the same format and atthe same bit rate as real-time data. LUTs thus directly receive the stored beacon messages acquired during anentire orbital revolution. If a new beacon signal is received during the stored memory dump, the dump isinterrupted so that the signal can be processed and the resultant message is interleaved with the stored data.Appropriate flag bits indicate whether the data are real-time or stored and the time at which full playback of thestored data was accomplished.1544.5 MHz downlink transmitter3.3.22 The 1544.5 MHz downlink transmitter accepts input from the 406 MHz receiver/processor and re-ceiver(s) operating on the other COSPAS–SARSAT band(s) (121.5 MHz and 243 MHz*), adjusts the relativepower level in accordance with ground command, phase-modulates a low-frequency carrier with the compositesignal, multiplies the frequency to produce 1544.5 MHz, amplifies the power level and drives the satellitedownlink antenna.Local user terminals and mission control centres3.3.23 The configuration and capabilities of each LUT vary to meet the specific requirements of countries, butthe COSPAS and SARSAT satellite downlink signal formats ensure interoperability between the various satellitesand all LUTs meeting COSPAS–SARSAT specifications.{3.3.24 There are two types of LUTs, those which process 121.5 MHz and 406 MHz signals and those whichprocess 406 MHz signals only.3.3.25 Figure 8 is a block diagram of a typical COSPAS–SARSAT LUT. The antenna and receiving systempick up the signal, which is down-converted to an intermediate frequency (IF) and linearly demodulated toproduce the composite baseband spectrum, which is filtered and separated into the various bands of interest. Asthe signal is received, the processing of each band is accomplished according to the specific capabilities of theLUT. The option for LUT configuration incorporating analogue tape recorders provides a back-up mode in theevent of processor failure. A/D 121.5 MHz1544.5 MHz SIGNAL CONVERTER PROCESSOR playback 121.5 MHz bands ANALOGUE ELT/EPIRB 408 MHz pre- locations PHASE TAPE COMMUNICATION ANTENNA RECEIVER processed data DEMODULATOR RECORDER INTERFACE (2400 bit/s) orbital (optional) data playback BIT & 406 MHz ANTENNA DATA FRAME DRIVE PROCESSOR SYNC. CONTROL updated orbit & time ELECTRONICS TIME CODE orbital data GENERATION FREQUENCY STANDARD Figure 8 – Example of a COSPAS–SARSAT LUT functional block diagram* See second footnote to paragraph 3.3.1.{ Refer to the following COSPAS–SARSAT basic documents: .1 Specification for COSPAS–SARSAT 406 MHz Distress Beacons (C/S T.001); .2 Local User Terminal (LUT) Performance Specification (C/S T.002); .3 COSPAS–SARSAT Data Distribution Plan (C/S A.001); .4 COSPAS–SARSAT MCC Standard Interface Description (C/S A.002).
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 3 Page 213.3.26 For the 121.5 MHz signal, each transmission is detected and the Doppler shift is calculated. A beaconlocation is then determined, using these data. All 406 MHz data received from the satellite memory on each passcan be processed within a few minutes of pass completion. Figures 9 and 10 show a typical LUT and an exampleof an MCC/RCC. Figure 9 – Example of a local user terminal Figure 10 – Example of a mission control centre/rescue co-ordination centre
  • Page 22 GMDSS Handbook – Part 3 N TUL 2 TUL 1 TUL segassem gnimocni evieceR sTUL lla morf evieceR gnimocni nocaeb egrem dna troS rehtO evloser ot snoitacol nocaeb erotS segassem sCCM rehto morf ytiugibma atad sCCM timsnarT timsnarT gniogtuo gniogtuo etareneG rehtO eht ni segassem gniogtuo sCCR segassem segassem sCCM rehto ot tamrof deriuqer sCCR ot sCCM niatniam dna tcelloC noitamrofni lacitsitats Figure 11 – Functions of MCCs3.3.27 MCCs have been set up in each country operating at least one LUT. Their main functions are to collect,store and sort the data from LUTs and other MCCs, and to provide such data to SAR networks (see figure 11).Most of the data handled consist of the following: .1 Alert data is the generic term for COSPAS–SARSAT 121.5 and 406 MHz data derived from EPIRB information. Alert data comprise the beacon location and (for 406 MHz satellite EPIRBs) other information such as beacon identification data and other coded information. .2 System information is primarily used to maintain efficient operation of the COSPAS–SARSAT system and to provide users with as accurate and timely alert data as possible. It consists of tabulated data (ephemeris and time calibration) used to determine beacon locations, the current status of all sub- systems, and co-ordination messages required to operate the COSPAS–SARSAT system.3.3.28 The COSPAS mission control centre (CMC) in Moscow is responsible for co-ordinating all COSPASactivities and provides the link via the SARSAT MCCs for all interaction with the SARSAT system. The CMCcomputes and sends COSPAS satellite ephemeris data to other MCCs and LUTs, and receives, processes andtransmits SARSAT ephemeris and time calibration data received from the SARSAT MCC to the COSPASMCCs and LUTs.3.3.29 A designated MCC in the United States (USMCC) acts as a focal point for the co-ordination ofSARSAT satellite operations. It calculates 406 MHz satellite EPIRB locations, using stored data received fromLUTs, distributes ephemeris data, processes time calibration data (required for use of SARSAT 406 MHz data),and forwards the appropriate results to other MCCs. The USMCC acts as the main system operational contactpoint between the SARSAT system and the CMC.
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 3 Page 23System performance and operationsPerformance parameters3.3.30 The following parameters are particularly important for the user: . EPIRB detection probability; . EPIRB location probability; . EPIRB location error; . ambiguity resolution probability; . capacity; . coverage; and . notification time..1 EPIRB detection probability for the 406 MHz satellite EPIRB is defined as the probability of detection by LUT of at least one message with a correct code-protected section from the first tracked satellite..2 EPIRB location probability for the 406 MHz satellite EPIRB is defined as the probability of detecting and decoding at least four individual message bursts during a single satellite pass so that a Doppler curve-set estimate can be generated by the LUT. At 121.5 MHz, EPIRB location probability is defined as the probability of location during a satellite pass above 108 elevation with respect to the beacon. EPIRB location probability relates to the two solutions (‘‘true’’ and ‘‘mirror’’) and not to a single unambiguous result..3 EPIRB location accuracy is defined as the difference between the location calculated by the system using measured Doppler frequencies and the actual location..4 Ambiguity resolution probability is defined as the ability of the system to select the ‘‘true’’ rather than the ‘‘mirror’’ location..5 Capacity is defined as the number of EPIRBs in common view of the spacecraft which the system can process simultaneously..6 Notification time is the period from activation of an EPIRB (i.e. first transmission) to reception of a valid alert message by the appropriate RCC.Performance of the COSPAS–SARSAT system3.3.31 The system performance characteristics are given in table 1. Note: Performance at 121.5 MHz is highly sensitive to EPIRB spectral characteristics. The values given below were confirmed by statistical analysis of over 5,000 beacons during the development and experi- ment phase. Table 1 Characteristic 121.5 MHz 406 MHz Detection probability (not applicable) 0.98 Location probability 0.9 0.9 Location accuracy 17.2 km 90% within 5 km Ambiguity resolution probability 0.73 0.96 Capacity 10 90.1 Coverage: The 121.5 MHz system operates in real time only, while the 406 MHz system operates in both real-time and global modes. The overall coverage provided by the COSPAS–SARSAT system in real- time mode is determined by the number and positions of LUTs, each covering an area with a radius of approximately 2,500 km.
  • Page 24 GMDSS Handbook – Part 3The real-time coverage of LUTs is shown in the COSPAS–SARSAT system status in annex 6. In the globalcoverage mode, using 406 MHz satellite EPIRBs, complete world coverage is achieved..2 Notification time depends on the following parameters: . satellite constellation; . LUT configuration; . beacon location relative to an LUT; . beacon latitude; and . ground communication network.Operational procedures3.3.32 This section provides a description of alert data and system information and a general description of dataflow.Alert data3.3.33 Alert data users are defined as those responsible for SAR operations; system information users are primarilyorganizations with technical responsibility for the COSPAS–SARSAT system (MCCs, LUT operators, managersof ground-segment facilities).3.3.34 Alert data are of two types: coded beacon-generated messages and LUT/MCC-generated alert messages.Signals transmitted by activated EPIRBs provide the initial input which triggers the generation of alert messages.Once the incoming coded EPIRB message has been received and processed by the LUTs, the alert data areforwarded to the national MCC for distribution.3.3.35 Each MCC distributes alert data according to its own requirements and procedures to any countrywithin its service area which has agreed to accept such data. These data are given to SAR authorities so thatimmediate SAR action can be taken. Additionally, any MCC receiving alert data relating to an EPIRB withinanother MCC’s service area or elsewhere in the world relays that information to the appropriate MCC or SARauthority.System information3.3.36 The term system information covers five types of system messages – ephemeris messages, time calibrationmessages, telemetry data, satellite command messages and co-ordination messages: . Ephemeris or orbit vector information is used to acquire and track the satellite and to compute EPIRB positions. . Spacecraft time calibration is vital for the accurate determination of EPIRB locations. . Telemetry data provide information on the status of the on-board SAR instruments. . Satellite command messages are transmitted on uplink during the post-launch checkout procedure to correct faults or out-of-limit conditions. . Co-ordination messages are used to communicate general information required for COSPAS–SAR- SAT system operation.Communications network3.3.37 Each MCC transfers alert data and system information to ground-system elements within its service areaaccording to communications network requirements and procedures.Message formats3.3.38 Messages between MCCs are sent in a specific format permitting automatic processing and re-transmission, while messages between MCCs and their LUTs are formatted in accordance with national re-quirements. Standard message formats are used to transmit alert data to RCCs outside the COSPAS–SARSATsystem.
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 3 Page 253.4 Digital selective calling (DSC) systemIntroduction3.4.1 Digital selective calling (DSC) is an integral part of the GMDSS and is used for transmitting distress alertsfrom ships and for transmitting the associated acknowledgements from coast stations. It is also used by ships andcoast stations for relaying distress alerts and for other urgency and safety calls. Trials of DSC systems were co-ordinated by the CCIR Interim Working Party 8/10 during 1982–1986 and included tests of the HF, MF andVHF DSC systems. The distribution of VHF, MF and HF DSC coast stations is given in annex 5 (GMDSSMaster Plan).Basic description of DSCTechnical characteristics3.4.2 The system is a synchronous system using a ten-unit error-detecting code. The information in the call ispresented as a sequence of seven-unit binary combinations.3.4.3 The classes of emission, frequency shifts and modulation rates are as follows: . F1B or J2B 170 Hz and 100 baud for use on HF and MF channels. When frequency-shift keying is effected by applying audio signals to the input of single-sideband transmitters (J2B), the centre of the audio-frequency spectrum offered to the transmitter is 1700 Hz. . Frequency modulation with a pre-emphasis of 6 dB/octave with frequency shift of the modulating sub- carrier for use on VHF channels: – the frequency shift is between 1300 Hz and 2100 Hz, the sub-carrier being at 1700 Hz; – the frequency tolerance of the 1300 Hz and 2100 Hz tones is +10 Hz; – the modulation rate is 1,200 baud; and – the modulation index is 2.0 +10%.3.4.4 More detailed technical characteristics of DSC, including signal format, are given in annexes 3-2-1, -2, -3,-4, -5, -6 and -7.Operational procedures3.4.5 Recommendation ITU-R M.541* gives operational procedures of the DSC system. The content of aDSC call includes the numerical address of the station (or stations) to which the call is transmitted, the self-identification of the transmitting station and a message which contains several fields of information indicating thepurpose of the call.3.4.6 Various types of DSC calls are available, being broadly either distress and safety-related calls or ‘‘com-mercial’’ calls (to indicate that a commercial communication, e.g. a telephony or telegraphy call, etc., is required).In the case of VHF, automatic connection to the public network can also be established through suitablyequipped coast stations.3.4.7 The receipt of a DSC call by a receiving station is accompanied by a suitable display or print-out of theaddress, the self-identification of the transmitting station and the content of the DSC message, together with anaudible or visual alarm or both for certain categories of calls (e.g. for distress- and safety-related calls).3.4.8 The transmission speed of a DSC call is 100 baud on MF and HF and 1,200 baud on VHF. Error-correction coding is included, involving the transmission of each character twice together with an overallmessage-check character. The duration of a single DSC call varies between 6.2 and 7.2 seconds on MF and HF or0.45 and 0.63 second on VHF, depending on the type of DSC call transmitted.3.4.9 For distress and safety operation, simplex frequencies are used, there being one frequency in the MF band,five in the HF bands and one in the VHF band (these frequencies are given in annex 9-3). For commercialoperation at MF and HF, paired frequencies are used, but at VHF the simplex channel 70 is used for both distressand safety calling and commercial calling.* Annex 3-2-8. See also RR Art. N39 (annex 9-4).
  • Page 26 GMDSS Handbook – Part 33.4.10 In order to increase the probability of a DSC distress call or a DSC distress relay being received, it isrepeated several times to form a distress call attempt. On MF and HF two types of distress call attempts may be used,either a single-frequency call attempt* (five consecutive DSC distress calls on one frequency) or a multi-frequency callattempt* (up to six consecutive DSC distress calls dispersed over any of the six DSC distress frequencies – one onMF and five on HF). On VHF only a single-frequency call attempt is used since there is only one VHF DSCfrequency (channel 70). VHF and MF/HF distress calls may be transmitted simultaneously.3.4.11 The various distress and safety-related calls by DSC are itemized below, together with a description ofthe content of the message for each type of call. In addition to the message content, each DSC call also containsother information, which is not displayed to the receiving station but which is used to ensure the technicalintegrity of the DSC system. Signal format in the various DSC calls is specified in RecommendationITU-R M.493.{Distress call (alert)3.4.12 DSC distress calls are transmitted by a ship in distress and will be received by all suitably equipped shipsand coast stations within propagation range of the radio frequency used.3.4.13 A DSC distress call contains various items of information, including the self-identification of the ship indistress, which will be displayed to the receiving station. This information will either be automatically included inthe transmitted DSC distress call or will be inserted by the operator prior to transmission. When time does notpermit the insertion of any information, ‘‘default’’ information will be included automatically.Distress acknowledgement3.4.14 Distress acknowledgements by DSC are normally transmitted manually by coast stations in response to aDSC distress call on the same frequency as the distress call was received (RR N3129, N3130{). However, adistress alert may be acknowledged by ship stations when they believe that no coast station is likely to be able toacknowledge it (RR N3132, N3133 and N3124{). In this case, the acknowledgement is made by radiotelephonyon the associated radiotelephone distress and safety traffic frequency.}Distress relay3.4.15 DSC distress relays are transmitted in the following two situations: .1 By a coast station to alert ships in the area of a distress incident. Such a relay transmission would be addressed, as appropriate, to all ships, to a selected group of ships or to a specific ship (RR N3117{). .2 By a ship station to an appropriate coast station if it received a DSC distress call on an HF frequency and it was not acknowledged by a coast station within 3 minutes (RR N3134{).3.4.16 The distress relay is transmitted as either a single-frequency or a multi-frequency call attempt.3.4.17 If a ship receives a DSC distress relay addressed to ships in a particular geographical area,} then the displayor print-out and alarm will not be activated if geographical co-ordinates inserted manually or by navigationalinterface into the receiving ship station’s DSC equipment processor lie outside the addressed geographical area.DSC distress call repetitions and acknowledgement transmissions3.4.18 If no distress acknowledgement is received in response to a DSC distress call transmission, then the shipin distress may repeat the DSC distress call attempt (on different DSC distress frequencies if desired) after a delayof between 3.5 and 4.5 minutes from the beginning of the initial call.|| This delay allows time for any ac-knowledgement to be received.* See Recommendation ITU-R M.541, Annex 1, paragraphs 3.1.3.1 and 3.1.3.2 (annex 3-2-8).{ Annex 3-2-7.{ See annex 9-6.} Recommendation ITU-R M.541, Annex 1, paragraph 3.3.4 (see annex 3-2-8).} Recommendation ITU-R M.493, Annex 1, paragraph 5.3 (see annex 3-2-7).|| Recommendation ITU-R M.541, Annex 1, paragraph 3.1.3 (see annex 3-2-8).
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 3 Page 273.4.19 A coast station receiving a DSC distress call on MF or HF should transmit a DSC distress acknowl-edgement after a minimum delay of 1 minute after receipt of the distress call, normally within a maximum delayof 2.75 minutes. On VHF, a DSC distress acknowledgement should be transmitted as soon as practicable.*Reception of DSC calls3.4.20 All DSC distress-related calls transmitted on MF and HF contain, at the beginning of each single call, a200-bit 100-baud (i.e. 2 seconds) dot pattern to allow the use of scanning receivers on board ships. When used, ascanning receiver should be set to scan only the desired DSC distress frequencies, i.e. selected from the one MFfrequency and the five HF frequencies.3.4.21 It is important to ensure that, where a scanning receiver is used, all selected frequencies are scannedwithin 2 seconds, and the dwell time on each frequency should be adequate to allow detection of the dot pattern.The scan should only stop on detection of a 100-baud dot pattern. It is advisable that coast stations are able toreceive more than one DSC distress-related call simultaneously on different frequencies, and scanning receiversshould therefore not be used at coast stations.DSC shipborne equipment3.4.22 Figure 12 shows an example of a DSC control unit which, together with suitable VHF or MF/HF radioequipment, provides a complete shipborne radio system for automatic or manual operation within the DSCsystem for use in the maritime mobile services. Figure 12 – Example of a DSC control unit3.4.23 The unit consists of a modem and a signal coder/decoder for producing DSC signals; it also contains acentral processor unit for creating the different call formats, etc.3.4.24 In addition, the unit includes an interface sub-unit, enabling automatic channel control of the connectedVHF radio equipment, hard-copy printing of messages, and data collection from, for example, the navigationalequipment on board the ship.3.4.25 The unit also contains an audio alarm, giving an acoustic alarm when a DSC message is received.3.4.26 The information contained in the received DSC message is decoded and displayed on the front panelLCD display. This information may be stored in an internal memory.* Recommendation ITU-R M.541, Annex 1, paragraph 3.3.2 (see annex 3-2-8).
  • Page 28 GMDSS Handbook – Part 33.4.27 When receiving DSC messages other than a distress, urgency or safety call, the control unit provides foran automatic transmission acknowledging the call received.3.4.28 Transmission of a distress call by VHF DSC from the ship in distress can be initiated by simply pushingthe distress button on the front panel of the control unit. The control unit also provides a function for includingadditional information concerning the distress situation in the distress message. Once initiated, the distress call isautomatically repeated at intervals of about 4 minutes* until acknowledged by another station or interruptedmanually.3.4.29 By using the keypad on the front panel of the control unit, the operator can compose different types ofDSC message. In the case of VHF, the operator may, for individual DSC messages to a coast station, include inthe message the telephone number of the land subscriber, thus providing for the use of semi-automatic VHFsystems expected to be implemented at coast stations in the future.3.4.30 The control unit includes an internal register, enabling the operator to store, for example, identitynumbers of the coast stations with which the ship often operates. Also, telephone numbers of land subscribersmay be stored in the register. These facilities make it possible for the operator to use abbreviated forms whencomposing DSC messages to coast stations.3.5 Search and rescue radar transponders (SARTs)Introduction3.5.1 Search and rescue radar transponders (SARTs) are the main means in the GMDSS for locating ships indistress or their survival craft, and their carriage on board ships is mandatory (regulations III/6.22 and IV/7.1.3).The SART operates in the 9 GHz frequency band and generates a series of response signals on being interrogatedby any ordinary 9 GHz shipborne radar or suitable airborne radar. No modification is needed to a ship’s radarequipment for detecting SART signals. SARTs can be either portable, for use on board ship or carrying into anysurvival craft, installed on the ship and in each survival craft, or so as to operate after floating free from the sinkingship (figure 13). They may also be incorporated into a float-free satellite EPIRB. Technical details of SARTs aregiven in annexes 3-6-1 and 3-6-8.Operational and technical characteristics3.5.2 The SART can be activated manually or automatically when placed into the water so that it will thereafterrespond when interrogated.3.5.3 When activated in a distress situation, the SART responds to radar interrogation by transmitting a swept-frequency signal which generates a line of blip code (figure 14) on a radar screen outward from the SART’sposition along its line of bearing.{ This unique radar signal is easily recognized on the radar screen and the rescuevessel (and aircraft, if equipped with suitable radar) can detect the survivors even in poor visibility or at night.3.5.4 The SART provides a visual or audible indication of its correct operation and will also inform survivorswhen it is interrogated by a radar.3.5.5 The SART will have sufficient battery capacity to operate in the stand-by condition for 96 hours and willbe able to operate under ambient temperatures of –208C to +558C.3.5.6 The vertical polar diagram of the antenna and the hydrodynamic characteristics of the device will permitthe SART to respond to radars under heavy swell conditions. SART transmission is substantially omnidirectionalin the horizontal plane.3.6 Equipment performance standardsIn order to ensure proper operation, radio equipment carried in the GMDSS is required to be type-approved byAdministrations in accordance with the performance standards developed by IMO (regulation IV/14). Thesestandards, in addition to requiring the radio equipment to comply with the relevant ITU-R recommendations,define various operational requirements to be met.* See Recommendation ITU-R M.541, Annex 1, paragraphs 3.1.3.1 and 3.1.3.2 (see annex 3-2-8).{ See annex 3-6-7.
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 3 Page 29 Figure 13 – Search and rescue radar transponders Figure 14 – SART blip code on a radar screen3.7 Maritime safety information (MSI) systemIntroduction3.7.1 The World-Wide Navigational Warning Service (WWNWS) was established by IMO and IHO for thepurpose of co-ordinating the transmission of navigational warnings to ships in co-ordinated geographical areas(NAVAREAs*). In the GMDSS, the WWNWS was included in the systems developed for the promulgation ofmaritime safety information (MSI).3.7.2 Radio systems to be used internationally for the promulgation of MSI in the GMDSS and for whichrequirements have been included in SOLAS chapter IV{ are: . the International NAVTEX system; . the International SafetyNET system; and* See annex 4-1 (WWNWS).{ See annex 2-13. See also annexes 3-5-3, -4 and -6.
  • Page 30 GMDSS Handbook – Part 3 . HF narrow-band direct-printing (NBDP), which may be used to augment these systems (under de- velopment)*3.7.3 The HF Morse telegraphy system which is currently used for broadcasts of NAVAREA warnings will besuperseded by the above automated systems during the implementation period of the GMDSS.3.7.4 Annex 4 gives more details of the co-ordination of various MSI systems.The International NAVTEX system3.7.5 This system is an international direct-printing service for promulgation of MSI in the English language,pertaining to coastal waters up to about 400 nautical miles offshore. Unlike NAVAREA warnings, which aretailored for international sea commerce on or near main shipping lanes, NAVTEX carries information relevant toall sizes and types of vessels within a region established for this service. It also carries routine meteorologicalforecasts and warnings and other urgent safety information to ships. A selective message-rejection feature of thereceiver allows the mariner to receive only that safety information pertinent to his requirements.3.7.6 Procedures to be followed by Administrations and the ITU Radiocommunication Bureau for co-ordi-nation of the planned used of the frequency 518 kHz in the International NAVTEX system are contained in RRArticle 14A.3.7.7 The existing NAVAREAs are used as regions for planning and co-ordination of the InternationalNAVTEX service. To assist such planning and advise IMO on the progress and on solutions to problems ofsystem expansion, IMO has established the NAVTEX Co-ordinating Panel, which reports to the IMO Sub-Committee on Radiocommunications and Search and Rescue (COMSAR). The List of NAVTEX services isgiven in annex 5 (the GMDSS Master Plan).3.7.8 NAVTEX is a single-frequency broadcast system; the frequency 518 kHz is used for this purpose.{Mutual interference will be avoided by limiting the transmitter power to that necessary for coverage of theassigned area and by co-ordinating the broadcast schedules. MSI on the International NAVTEX service isbroadcast in English. A dedicated receiver/processor (figure 15) is used for the reception of NAVTEX broadcasts.Details of the system are contained in the NAVTEX Manual, given in annex 4-2. For the technical characteristicsof NAVTEX receivers, see annexes 3-5-1 and 3-5-5. Figure 15 – Example of a NAVTEX receiver* See annex 3-5-4.{ See RR Art. 14A. N2969 and N2970 (annexes 9-1 and 9-3).
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 3 Page 31Enhanced group call (EGC) system3.7.9 The enhanced group call (EGC) (SafetyNET*) system, which was developed by Inmarsat, enables theprovision of a unique global automated service capable of addressing messages to pre-determined groups of shipsor all vessels in both fixed and variable geographical areas.3.7.10 The system is able to meet requirements of broadcasting global, regional or local navigational warnings,meteorological warnings and forecasts and shore-to-ship distress alerts to any region within Inmarsat satellitecoverage. In addition to covering the mid-ocean areas, the SafetyNET system can also provide an automatedservice in coastal waters where it may not be feasible to establish the NAVTEX service or where shipping densityis too low to warrant its implementation.3.7.11 A particularly useful feature is the ability to direct a call to a given geographical area. The area may befixed, as in the case of a NAVAREA or weather forecast area, or it may be uniquely defined. This is useful formessages, such as a local storm warning or a shore-to-ship distress alert, for which it is inappropriate to alert allships in the satellite coverage area.3.7.12 SafetyNET messages originate from registered information providers anywhere in the world and arebroadcast to the appropriate ocean region via a CES. Messages are transmitted by the CES according to theirpriority, e.g. distress, urgency, safety and routine.3.7.13 Aboard ship, SafetyNET messages will be received either via a dedicated receiver (figure 16) or via anoptional receiver integrated in Inmarsat SES equipment. Upon reception of messages of distress or urgencycategory, aural and visual alarms are activated and they can only be reset manually. Performance standards for theEGC receiver are given in annex 3-5-2.3.7.14 IMO has established the International SafetyNET Co-ordinating Panel for the purpose of co-ordinatingthe development and the use of the International SafetyNET system for promulgating MSI. More details of thesystem are contained in the International SafetyNET Manual, given in annex 4-3. Figure 16 – Inmarsat EGC receiver* Note: SafetyNET and FleetNET are registered servicemarks of Inmarsat.
  • Page 32 GMDSS Handbook – Part 4 Part 4 GMDSS equipment carriage requirements4.1 All the ships to which the 1974 SOLAS Convention, as amended in 1988, applies are required to carry theGMDSS radio equipment, depending on the sea areas in which they operate, prescribed in the Convention (givenin annex 1).4.2 One of the basic principles on which the GMDSS carriage requirements is based is (as prescribed inregulation IV/4) a functional requirement to ensure the capability of transmitting ship-to-shore distress alerts by atleast two separate and independent means. The capability of performing other communications functions is alsorequired. Regulations IV/7 to IV/11 regulate the specific carriage requirements for ships according to the seaarea(s) in which they operate.4.3 Carriage requirements for GMDSS radio equipment can be summarized as follows: . sea area A1: ships shall carry VHF equipment and either a satellite EPIRB or a VHF EPIRB; . sea area A2: ships shall carry VHF and MF equipment and a satellite EPIRB; . sea area A3: ships shall carry VHF, MF, a satellite EPIRB and either HF or satellite communication equipment; . sea area A4: ships shall carry VHF, MF and HF equipment and a satellite EPIRB; and . all ships shall carry equipment for receiving MSI broadcasts.4.4 The 1974 SOLAS Convention, as amended in 1988, sets out the time-frame for installing the GMDSSradio equipment (regulation IV/1), taking into account system amortization, operational continuity, personneltraining, etc. To this end, the following transitional approach for the implementation of the GMDSS is given: . all ships constructed after 1 February 1992 to be fitted with a radar transponder and two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus for survival craft; . all ships to be fitted with a NAVTEX receiver and a satellite EPIRB by 1 August 1993; . all ships constructed before 1 February 1992 to be fitted with a radar transponder and two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus for survival craft by 1 February 1995; . all ships constructed after 1 February 1995 to comply with all the appropriate requirements for the GMDSS; . all ships to be fitted with at least one radar capable of operating in the 9 GHz band by 1 February 1995; and . all ships to comply with the appropriate requirements for the GMDSS by 1 February 1999.4.5 Ships which are not required to comply with the 1974 SOLAS Convention are recommended to complywith the guidelines for the participation of non-Convention ships in the GMDSS (MSC/Circ. 803), given inannex 7-8.4.6 The GMDSS requirements are also included in the following convention and codes: . Protocol of 1993 relating to the Torremolinos International Convention for the Safety of Fishing Vessels, 1977 . 1991 Amendments to the Code for the Construction and Equipment of Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODU Code) . International Code of Safety for High-Speed Craft
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 4 Page 334.7 Amendments to the following instruments are under consideration by IMO for their compatibility withthe GMDSS: . FAO/ILO/IMO Code of Safety for Fishermen and Fishing Vessels; . FAO/ILO/IMO Voluntary Guidelines for the Design, Construction and Equipment of Small Fishing Vessels; and . Code on Alarms and Indicators (resolution A.830(19)).
  • Page 34 GMDSS Handbook – Part 5 Part 5 Operational procedures for the GMDSS5.1 Operational procedures for distress, safety and urgency communications in the GMDSS are prescribed inthe Radio Regulations, Articles N39 and N40, given in annexes 9-3 and 9-4, respectively.5.2 The following documents, reproduced in annex 3, give detailed operational procedures for GMDSS radioequipment: . Operational procedures for the use of digital selective-calling equipment in the maritime mobile service (Recommendation ITU-R M.541 (annex 3-2-8)); . Operational procedures for the use of direct-printing telegraph equipment in the maritime mobile service (Recommendation ITU-R M.492 (annex 3-2-12)); and . Operational and technical characteristics for an automated direct-printing telegraph system for pro- mulgation of navigational and meteorological warnings and urgent information to ships (Recommend- ation ITU-R M.540 (annex 3-5-5)).5.3 Actions to be taken by masters of ships in distress situations are summarized in annex 8-5 (GMDSSoperating guidance for masters of ships in distress situations – COM/Circ. 108).
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 6 Page 35 Part 6 Shore-based SAR communication network and operation6.1 To exploit the full advantages of globally integrated satellite and terrestrial communications, the GMDSSnecessitates the establishment of an efficient communication network between RCCs. This will consist ofinterconnecting links between RCCs in accordance with arrangements made by IMO in support of the 1979SAR Convention. In addition, each RCC will need rapid and effective communication links with its associatedcoast stations, Inmarsat CESs and COSPAS–SARSAT MCCs.6.2 The interconnecting links between RCCs will usually be implemented using the public switched net-works or dedicated circuits. Some RCCs, particularly those not having sufficient access to the public switchednetworks, may use an Inmarsat SES to assist in the rapid exchange of distress and safety information betweenRCCs (RR N2938*).6.3 The communications network for the future system and associated SAR procedures will be flexibleenough to satisfy many levels of international SAR co-ordination from the ideal of ocean areas where a SAR plan{is operational, through many variations in the designation of search and rescue regions (SRR) and provision ofSAR facilities, to the worst cases where no responsibility has been assumed for, nor facilities provided in, a specificarea.6.4 SAR action in response to any distress situation will be achieved through co-operation among SARAdministrations which are able to provide assistance.6.5 The shore station nearest to the reported distress position should, whenever possible, acknowledge thealert. Other shore stations receiving the alert should acknowledge it if the nearest station does not appear torespond. The shore station which acknowledges the alert must establish and maintain communications with theship in distress until relieved of this duty.6.6 The first RCC, which is the RCC affiliated with the shore station which first acknowledged the alert,should assume responsibility for all subsequent co-ordination of SAR measures unless and until that responsibilityis accepted by another RCC which is in a better position to assist.6.7 If it is not at once clear which RCC has become the first RCC because more than one shore station hasacknowledged the alert, the RCCs concerned should, as soon as possible, agree which is to become the first RCCso that the incident is responded to promptly. Follow-up action by the first RCC to co-ordinate SAR activities orto refer action to a more suitable RCC should also be carried out promptly.6.8 A flow-chart for communications and procedures, illustrating the actions to be taken by the first RCC, isgiven in figure 17.* See annex 9-2.{ Pursuant to the 1979 SAR Convention, IMO is developing a global SAR plan to co-ordinate search and rescue services in all maritime areasthrough bilateral or multilateral agreements among coastal States.
  • CCR tsriF`` eht yb snoitcA ± 71 erugiF SEY SEY ?tnedicni ?RRS CCR rehto eht rof ytilibisnopser rehtonaGMDSS Handbook – Part 6 eht ot seitilibisnopser tpecca ot deraperp ON ni tnedicni noitanidro-oc refsnarT ON CCR rehto eht sI eht sI SEY ON tsissa ?RRS ot noitisop nwo sti retteb a ni CCR ni tnedicni ON rehto yna eht sI ereht sI SEY ssertsid ni stsacdaorb yb ytiniciv ssertsid ni pihs eht CCR yb pihs eht ot ecnatsissa eht ni spihs esivdA htiw etacinummoc deviecer llac/trelA etanidro-oC ,elbacitcarp erehWPage 36
  • GMDSS Handbook – Part 7 Page 37 Part 7 Master Plan for the GMDSSIn order to provide information on shore-based facilities for space and terrestrial communication services for theGMDSS, the information provided by Governments in accordance with regulation IV/5.2 of the 1988 SOLASamendments, in response to MSC/Circ. 684 or revisions thereof, is being included by IMO in the Master Plan forthe GMDSS (GMDSS/Circ.8 as it may be revised) given at annex 5.The Master Plan includes: Annex 1 – Status of shore-based facilities for the GMDSS Annex 2 – List of VHF DSC coast stations for sea areas A1 Annex 3 – List of MF DSC coast stations for sea areas A2 Annex 4 – List of HF DSC coast stations for sea areas A3 and A4 Annex 5 – List of Inmarsat coast earth stations Annex 6 – List of rescue co-ordination centres using ship earth stations Annex 7 – NAVTEX service Annex 8 – The International SafetyNET service Annex 9 – HF NBDP maritime safety information broadcast service Annex 10 – List of COSPAS–SARSAT Mission Control Centres and Local User Terminals Annex 11 – Maps of shore-based facilities for the GMDSS Annex 12 – Satellite EPIRB registration information Annex 13 – List of 24-hour points of contact for MMSI ship’s identification Annex 14 – Questionnaire on shore-based facilities for the GMDSS (MSC/Circ. 684)
  • Page 38 GMDSS Handbook – Part 8 Part 8 Maintenance of equipment in the GMDSS8.1 In the GMDSS, ships are not necessarily required to carry radio personnel on board for the purpose of themaintenance of equipment. The following are three options which ships may choose as methods to ensure theavailability of equipment: . duplication of equipment; . shore-based maintenance; . at-sea electronic maintenance capability (on-board maintenance).8.2 As prescribed in regulation IV/15.7 of the 1988 SOLAS amendments, for ships which navigate in GMDSSsea areas A1 or A2, availability shall be ensured by using at least one of the three methods; ships which navigate insea areas A3 and A4 shall employ a combination of at least two of the above three options.8.3 SOLAS regulation IV/15.7 requires Administrations to take into account the recommendations of IMOwhen they nationally approve the methods to be employed in order to ensure availability in sea areas A3 and A4.*The recommendations of IMO are given in annex 2-10 (resolution A.702(17)).* Also see annex 8-3 (COM/Circ.105): ‘‘Clarifications of certain provisions of the 1988 SOLAS amendments for the GMDSS’’.
  • Annex 1 Amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, relating to the GMDSSResolutions of the Conference of Contracting Governments to the International Conventionfor the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, on the GMDSS (adopted on 9 November 1988) Annex 1-1 – Resolution 1: Adoption of amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, concerning radiocommunications for the global maritime distress and safety system Annex: Amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, concerning radiocommunications for the global maritime distress and safety system Annex 1-2 – Resolution 2: Records of Equipment to supplement the SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate, Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate and Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate Annex: Records of Equipment Annex 1-3 – Resolution 3: Recommendation on the early introduction of global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) elements Annex 1-4 – Resolution 4: Recommendation on the early introduction of GMDSS radio life-saving appliances Annex 1-5 – Resolution 5: Reviews of the requirements of SOLAS regulation IV/15.7 Annex 1-6 – Resolution 6: Recommendation on application of administrative, financial and operational arrangements for the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) Annex 1-7 – Resolution 7: Recommendation on the coding of satellite emergency position-indicating radio beacons operating in the COSPAS–SARSAT system Annex 1-8 – Resolution 8: Promotion of technical co-operation with regard to the GMDSS Other resolutions Annex 1-9 – Resolution MSC.27(61): Adoption of amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (adopted on 11 December 1992) Annex: Amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, Annex 1-10 – Resolution 1 of the Conference of Contracting Governments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (adopted on 29 November 1995): Adoption of amendments to the annex to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 Annex: Amendments to the annex to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 Annex 1-11 – Resolution MSC.47(66): Adoption of amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (adopted on 4 June 1996) Annex: Amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 Annex 1-12 – Resolution MSC.69(69): Adoption of amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended (adopted on 18 May 1998) Annex: Amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 1 Annex 1-1 Resolution 1 of the 1988 GMDSS Conference: Adoption of amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, concerning radiocommunications for the global maritime distress and safety systemTHE CONFERENCE,NOTING article VIII(c) of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (hereinafter referred toas ‘‘the Convention’’), concerning the procedure for amending the Convention by a Conference of ContractingGovernments,HAVING CONSIDERED amendments to the Convention concerning radiocommunications proposed and cir-culated to the Members of the Organization and all Contracting Governments to the Convention,1. ADOPTS, in accordance with article VIII(c)(ii) of the Convention, amendments to chapters I, II-1, III, IV, Vof, and the appendix to the Convention, the texts of which are given in the annex to the present resolution;2. DECIDES, in accordance with article VIII(c)(iii), that the amendments shall be deemed to have beenaccepted and shall enter into force in accordance with the following procedures: (a) The amendments shall be deemed to have been accepted on 1 February 1990, unless by that date one third of the Contracting Governments, or Contracting Governments the combined merchant fleets of which constitute not less than fifty per cent of the gross tonnage of the world’s merchant fleet, notify the Secretary-General of the Organization that they object to the amendments; (b) The amendments which are deemed to have been accepted in accordance with paragraph (a) shall enter into force with respect to all Contracting Governments except those which have objected to the amendments under paragraph (a) and which have not withdrawn such objections, on 1 February 1992. Annex to resolution 1 Amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, concerning radiocommunications for the global maritime distress and safety system* CHAPTER I General provisions Part B Surveys and certificatesRegulation 7Surveys of passenger ships(a) A passenger ship shall be subjected to the surveys specified below: (i) A survey before the ship is put in service. (ii) A periodical survey once every twelve months. (iii) Additional surveys, as occasion arises.* The base text is taken from the 1992 Consolidated Edition of the 1974 SOLAS Convention, which incorporates the 1981, 1983 and 1989amendments. The 1988 amendments concerning radiocommunications for the GMDSS are indicated by a small hollow triangle at the beginning (")and end (3) of the amended text or, in the case of extensive amendments, by an opening triangle at the beginning of each amended paragraph or page.
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 2 GMDSS Handbook(b) The surveys referred to above shall be carried out as follows: (i) The survey before the ship is put in service shall include a complete inspection of its structure, machinery and equipment, including the outside of the ship’s bottom and the inside and outside of the boilers. This survey shall be such as to ensure that the arrangements, material, and scantlings of the structure, boilers and other pressure vessels and their appurtenances, main and auxiliary machinery, electrical installation, "radio installations including those used in life-saving appliances, fire protection, fire safety systems and appliances, life-saving appliances and arrangements, shipborne navigational equipment, nautical publications, means of embarkation for pilots and other equipment3 fully comply with the requirements of the present regulations, and of the laws, decrees, orders and regulations promulgated as a result thereof by the Administration for ships of the service for which it is intended. The survey shall also be such as to ensure that the workmanship of all parts of the ship and its equipment is in all respects satisfactory, and that the ship is provided with the lights, shapes, means of making sound signals and distress signals as required by the provisions of the present regulations and the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea in force. (ii) The periodical survey shall include an inspection of the structure, boilers and other pressure vessels, machinery and equipment, including the outside of the ship’s bottom. The survey shall be such as to ensure that the ship, as regards the structure, boilers and other pressure vessels and their appurtenances, main and auxiliary machinery, electrical installation, "radio installations including those used in life- saving appliances, fire protection, fire safety systems and appliances, life-saving appliances and ar- rangements, shipborne navigational equipment, nautical publications, means of embarkation for pilots and other equipment,3 is in satisfactory condition and fit for the service for which it is intended, and that it complies with the requirements of the present regulations, and of the laws, decrees, orders and regulations promulgated as a result thereof by the Administration. The lights, shapes and means of making sound signals and the distress signals carried by the ship shall also be subject to the above- mentioned survey for the purpose of ensuring that they comply with the requirements of the present regulations and of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea in force. (iii) A survey either general or partial, according to the circumstances, shall be made after a repair resulting from investigations prescribed in regulation 11 of this chapter, or whenever any important repairs or renewals are made. The survey shall be such as to ensure that the necessary repairs or renewals have been effectively made, that the material and workmanship of such repairs or renewals are in all respects satisfactory, and that the ship complies in all respects with the provisions of the present regulations and of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea in force, and of the laws, decrees, orders and regulations promulgated as a result thereof by the Administration.(c) (i) The laws, decrees, orders and regulations referred to in paragraph (b) of this regulation shall be in all respects such as to ensure that, from the point of view of safety of life, the ship is fit for the service for which it is intended. (ii) They shall among other things prescribe the requirements to be observed as to the initial and sub- sequent hydraulic or other acceptable alternative tests to which the main and auxiliary boilers, con- nections, steam pipes, high pressure receivers, and fuel tanks for internal combustion engines are to be submitted including the test procedures to be followed and the intervals between two consecutive tests.Regulation 8Surveys of life-saving appliances and other equipment of cargo ships(a) "The life-saving appliances and arrangements (except radio installations), the shipborne navigationalequipment, the fire safety systems and appliances and the inert gas system of cargo ships of 500 tons gross tonnageand upwards3 to which chapters II-1, II-2, III and V apply, shall be subject to initial and subsequent surveys asprescribed for passenger ships in regulation 7 of this chapter with the substitution of 24 months for 12 months insubparagraph (a)(ii) of that regulation. The fire control plans in new ships and "means of embarkation of pilots,nautical publications,3 lights, shapes and means of making sound signals carried by new and existing ships shall beincluded in the surveys for the purpose of ensuring that they comply fully with the requirements of the presentregulations and, where applicable, the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea in force.** Refer to the Record of approved cargo ship safety equipment (SLS.14/Circ.1).
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 3(b) Intermediate surveys shall be made for tankers of ten years of age and over, within three months before orafter the anniversary date of the Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate, to ensure that equipment specified inparagraph (a) of this regulation has been maintained in accordance with regulation 11 of this chapter and that it isin good working condition. Such intermediate surveys shall be endorsed on the Cargo Ship Safety EquipmentCertificate issued in accordance with regulation 12(a)(iii) of this chapter.*Regulation 9"Surveys of radio installations of cargo ships"The radio installations of cargo ships, including those used in life-saving appliances, to which chapters III and IVapply, shall be subject to initial and subsequent surveys as provided for passenger ships in regulation 7 of thischapter.3Regulation 10Surveys of hull, machinery and equipment of cargo ships(a) The hull, machinery and equipment (other than items in respect of which Cargo Ship Safety EquipmentCertificates "or Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificates3 are issued) of a cargo ship shall be surveyed on completionand thereafter in such a manner as the Administration may consider necessary in order to ensure that theircondition is in all respects satisfactory and at the following intervals: (i) at intervals specified by the Administration but not exceeding five years (periodical surveys); (ii) in addition to such periodical surveys a tanker of 10 years of age and over shall undergo a minimum of one intermediate survey during the period of validity of its Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certifi- cate.* In cases where only one such intermediate survey is carried out in any one certificate validity period, it shall be held not before six months prior to, nor later than six months after, the half-way date of the certificate’s period of validity.(b) The initial and periodical survey shall be such as to ensure that the arrangements, material and scantlings ofthe structure, boilers and other pressure vessels, their appurtenances, main and auxiliary machinery includingsteering gear and associated control systems, electrical installation and other equipment are in all respects satis-factory for the service for which the ship is intended. Such surveys shall, in the case of tankers, also includeinspection of the outside of the ship’s bottom, pump-rooms, cargo and bunker piping systems, vent piping,pressure vacuum valves and flame screens.(c) The intermediate survey of tankers of 10 years of age and over shall include inspection of steering gearequipment and associated control systems, pump-rooms, cargo and bunker piping systems on deck and in pump-rooms, vent piping, pressure vacuum valves and flame screens, the electrical installations in dangerous zones, andthe outside of the ship’s bottom.{ In addition to the visual inspection of the electrical installation, the insulationresistance of the electrical equipment in dangerous zones is to be tested. If, upon examination, there should be anydoubt as to the condition of the piping, extra measures, such as pressure tests and thickness determination, shall betaken as necessary. Such intermediate surveys shall be endorsed on the Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificateissued in accordance with regulation 12(a)(ii) of this chapter.(d) A survey, either general or partial according to the circumstances, shall be made when required after aninvestigation prescribed in regulation 11 of this chapter, or whenever any important repairs or renewals are made.The survey shall be such as to ensure that the necessary repairs or renewals have been effectively made, that thematerial and workmanship of such repairs or renewals are in all respects satisfactory, and that the ship is fit toproceed to sea without danger to the ship or persons on board.Regulation 12Issue of certificates(a) (i) A certificate called a Passenger Ship Safety Certificate shall be issued after inspection and survey to a passenger ship which complies with the requirements of chapters II-1, II-2, III and IV and any other relevant requirements of the present regulations.* Refer to the Guidelines on surveys required by the SOLAS Protocol 1978, the International Bulk Chemical Code and the International Gas CarrierCode (resolution A.560(14)).{ Refer to the circular concerning inspection of the outside of the ship’s bottom (PSLS.2/Circ.5).
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 4 GMDSS Handbook (ii) A certificate called a Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate* shall be issued after survey to a cargo ship which satisfies the requirements for cargo ships on survey set out in regulation 10 of this chapter and complies with the applicable requirements of chapters II-1 and II-2 other than those relating to fire-extinguishing appliances and fire control plans. (iii) A certificate called a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate* shall be issued after inspection to a cargo ship which complies with the relevant requirements of chapters II-1, II-2 and III and any other relevant requirements of the present regulations." (iv) A certificate called a Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate shall be issued to a cargo ship which complies with the requirements of chapter IV and any other relevant requirements of the present regulations." (v) The Passenger Ship Safety Certificate, the Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate and the Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate, referred to in subparagraphs (i), (iii) and (iv), shall be supplemented by a Record of Equipment adopted by the Conference of Contracting Governments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, on the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System, 1988, by resolution 2 as it may be amended.3 (vi) When an exemption is granted to a ship under and in accordance with the provisions of the present regulations, a certificate called an Exemption Certificate shall be issued in addition to the certificates prescribed in this paragraph. (vii) Passenger Ship Safety Certificates, Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificates, Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificates, "Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificates3 and Exemption Certificates shall be issued either by the Administration or by any person or organization duly authorized by it. In every case, that Administration assumes full responsibility for the certificate."(b) Notwithstanding any other provisions of the present Convention, any certificate which is issued under, andin accordance with, the provisions of the Convention and which is current on 1 February 1992 shall remain validuntil it expires.3(c) A Contracting Government shall not issue certificates under, and in accordance with, the provisions of theInternational Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1960, 1948 or 1929, after the date on which acceptance ofthe present Convention by the Government takes effect.Regulation 14Duration and validity of certificates{(a) Certificates other than the Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate, the Cargo Ship Safety EquipmentCertificate and any Exemption Certificate shall be issued for a period not exceeding 12 months. The Cargo ShipSafety Construction Certificate shall be issued for a period not exceeding five years. The Cargo Ship SafetyEquipment Certificate shall be issued for a period not exceeding 24 months. Exemption Certificates shall not bevalid for longer than the period of the certificates to which they refer.(b) No extension of the five-year period of validity of the Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate shall bepermitted.(c) If a survey takes place within two months before the end of the period for which a "Cargo Ship SafetyRadio Certificate3 issued in respect of cargo ships of 300 tons gross tonnage and upwards, but less than 500 tonsgross tonnage, was originally issued, that certificate may be withdrawn, and a new certificate may be issued whichshall expire 12 months after the end of the said period.(d) If the ship at the time when a certificate, other than that referred to in paragraph (b) of this regulation,expires is not in a port of the State whose flag it is entitled to fly or in which it is to be surveyed, theAdministration may extend the certificate, but such extension shall be granted only for the purpose of allowingthe ship to complete its voyage to the State whose flag it is entitled to fly or in which it is to be surveyed, and thenonly in cases where it appears proper and reasonable to do so.* Refer to the circular concerning issue of supplements and attachments (PSLS.2/Circ.1).{ Refer to the circular relating to re-validation of certificates issued under SOLAS 1974 as modified by the SOLAS Protocol 1978 (PSLS.2/Circ.7).
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 5(e) No certificate shall be extended under the provisions of paragraph (d) of this regulation for a longer periodthan five months, and a ship to which an extension is granted shall not, on its arrival in the State whose flag it isentitled to fly or the port in which it is to be surveyed, be entitled by virtue of such extension to leave that port orState without having obtained a new certificate.(f) A certificate, other than that referred to in paragraph (b) of this regulation, which has not been extendedunder the foregoing provisions of this regulation, may be extended by the Administration for a period of grace upto one month from the date of expiry stated on it.(g) A certificate shall cease to be valid: (i) if the inspections and surveys are not carried out within the periods specified under regulations 7(a), 8, 9 and 10(a) of this chapter or as they may have been extended in accordance with paragraphs (d), (e) or (f) of this regulation, or (ii) upon transfer of the ship to the flag of another Government. A new certificate shall only be issued when the Government issuing the new certificate is fully satisfied that the ship is in compliance with the requirements of regulation 11(a) and (b) of this chapter. In the case of a transfer between Parties, if requested within three months after the transfer has taken place, the Government of the Party whose flag the ship was formerly entitled to fly shall, as soon as possible, transmit to the Administration copies of the certificates carried by the ship before the transfer and, if available, copies of the relevant survey reports. CHAPTER II-1 Construction – subdivision and stability, machinery and electrical installations Part D Electrical installationsRegulation 42Emergency source of electrical power in passenger ships(Paragraphs 2.6.1 and 4.2 of this regulation apply to ships constructed on or after 1 February 1992)1.1 A self-contained emergency source of electrical power shall be provided.1.2 The emergency source of electrical power, associated transforming equipment, if any, transitional source ofemergency power, emergency switchboard and emergency lighting switchboard shall be located above the up-permost continuous deck and shall be readily accessible from the open deck. They shall not be located forward ofthe collision bulkhead.1.3 The location of the emergency source of electrical power and associated transforming equipment, if any, thetransitional source of emergency power, the emergency switchboard and the emergency electric lightingswitchboards in relation to the main source of electrical power, associated transforming equipment, if any, and themain switchboard shall be such as to ensure to the satisfaction of the Administration that a fire or other casualty inspaces containing the main source of electrical power, associated transforming equipment, if any, and the mainswitchboard or in any machinery space of category A will not interfere with the supply, control and distributionof emergency electrical power. As far as practicable, the space containing the emergency source of electricalpower, associated transforming equipment, if any, the transitional source of emergency electrical power and theemergency switchboard shall not be contiguous to the boundaries of machinery spaces of category A or thosespaces containing the main source of electrical power, associated transforming equipment, if any, or the mainswitchboard.1.4 Provided that suitable measures are taken for safeguarding independent emergency operation under allcircumstances, the emergency generator may be used exceptionally, and for short periods, to supply non-emergency circuits.
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 6 GMDSS Handbook2 The electrical power available shall be sufficient to supply all those services that are essential for safety in anemergency, due regard being paid to such services as may have to be operated simultaneously. The emergencysource of electrical power shall be capable, having regard to starting currents and the transitory nature of certainloads, of supplying simultaneously at least the following services for the periods specified hereinafter, if theydepend upon an electrical source for their operation:2.1 For a period of 36 h, emergency lighting: .1 at every muster and embarkation station and over the sides as required by regulations III/11.4 and III/15.7; .2 in alleyways, stairways and exits giving access to the muster and embarkation stations, as required by regulation III/11.5; .3 in all service and accommodation alleyways, stairways and exits, personnel lift cars; .4 in the machinery spaces and main generating stations including their control positions; .5 in all control stations, machinery control rooms, and at each main and emergency switchboard; .6 at all stowage positions for firemen’s outfits; .7 at the steering gear; and .8 at the fire pump, the sprinkler pump and the emergency bilge pump referred to in paragraph 2.4 and at the starting position of their motors."2.2 For a period of 36 h:" .1 the navigation lights and other lights required by the International Regulations for Preventing Col- lisions at Sea in force; and" .2 on ships constructed on or after 1 February 1995, the VHF radio installation required by regulation IV/ 7.1.1 and IV/7.1.2; and, if applicable:" .2.1 the MF radio installation required by regulations IV/9.1.1, IV/9.1.2, IV/10.1.2 and IV/10.1.3;" .2.2 the ship earth station required by regulation IV/10.1.1; and" .2.3 the MF/HF radio installation required by regulations IV/10.2.1, IV/10.2.2 and IV/11.1.32.3 For a period of 36 h: .1 all internal communication equipment required in an emergency; .2 "the shipborne navigational equipment3 as required by regulation V/12; where such provision is unreasonable or impracticable the Administration may waive this requirement for ships of less than 5,000 tons gross tonnage; .3 the fire detection and fire alarm system, and the fire door holding and release system; and .4 for intermittent operation of the daylight signalling lamp, the ship’s whistle, the manually operated call points, and all internal signals that are required in an emergency;unless such services have an independent supply for the period of 36 h from an accumulator battery suitablylocated for use in an emergency.2.4 For a period of 36 h: .1 one of the fire pumps required by regulation II-2/4.3.1 and 4.3.3; .2 the automatic sprinkler pump, if any; and .3 the emergency bilge pump and all the equipment essential for the operation of electrically powered remote controlled bilge valves.2.5 For the period of time required by regulation 29.14 the steering gear if required to be so supplied by thatregulation.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 72.6 For a period of half an hour: .1 any watertight doors required by regulation 15 to be power-operated together with their indicators and warning signals; .2 the emergency arrangements to bring the lift cars to deck level for the escape of persons. The passenger lift cars may be brought to deck level sequentially in an emergency.2.7 In a ship engaged regularly on voyages of short duration, the Administration if satisfied that an adequatestandard of safety would be attained may accept a lesser period than the 36 h period specified in paragraphs 2.1 to2.5 but not less than 12 h.3 The emergency source of electrical power may be either a generator or an accumulator battery, which shallcomply with the following:3.1 Where the emergency source of electrical power is a generator, it shall be: .1 driven by a suitable prime mover with an independent supply of fuel having a flashpoint (closed cup test) of not less than 438C; .2 started automatically upon failure of the electrical supply from the main source of electrical power and shall be automatically connected to the emergency switchboard; those services referred to in paragraph 4 shall then be transferred automatically to the emergency generating set. The automatic starting system and the characteristic of the prime mover shall be such as to permit the emergency generator to carry its full rated load as quickly as is safe and practicable, subject to a maximum of 45 s; unless a second independent means of starting the emergency generating set is provided, the single source of stored energy shall be protected to preclude its complete depletion by the automatic starting system; and .3 provided with a transitional source of emergency electrical power according to paragraph 4.3.2 Where the emergency source of electrical power is an accumulator battery, it shall be capable of: .1 carrying the emergency electrical load without recharging while maintaining the voltage of the battery throughout the discharge period within 12% above or below its nominal voltage; .2 automatically connecting to the emergency switchboard in the event of failure of the main source of electrical power; and .3 immediately supplying at least those services specified in paragraph 4.4 The transitional source of emergency electrical power required by paragraph 3.1.3 shall consist of anaccumulator battery suitably located for use in an emergency which shall operate without recharging whilemaintaining the voltage of the battery throughout the discharge period within 12% above or below its nominalvoltage and be of sufficient capacity and so arranged as to supply automatically in the event of failure of either themain or emergency source of electrical power at least the following services, if they depend upon an electricalsource for their operation:4.1 For half an hour: .1 "the lighting required by paragraphs 2.1 and 2.2.1;3 .2 all services required by paragraphs 2.3.1, 2.3.3 and 2.3.4 unless such services have an independent supply for the period specified from an accumulator battery suitably located for use in an emergency.4.2 Power to operate the watertight doors, as required by regulation 15.7.3.3, but not necessarily all of themsimultaneously, unless an independent temporary source of stored energy is provided. Power to the control,indication and alarm circuits as required by regulation 15.7.2 for half an hour.5.1 The emergency switchboard shall be installed as near as is practicable to the emergency source of electricalpower.5.2 Where the emergency source of electrical power is a generator, the emergency switchboard shall be locatedin the same space unless the operation of the emergency switchboard would thereby be impaired.
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 8 GMDSS Handbook5.3 No accumulator battery fitted in accordance with this regulation shall be installed in the same space as theemergency switchboard. An indicator shall be mounted in a suitable place on the main switchboard or in themachinery control room to indicate when the batteries constituting either the emergency source of electricalpower or the transitional source of emergency electrical power referred to in paragraph 3.1.3 or 4 are beingdischarged.5.4 The emergency switchboard shall be supplied during normal operation from the main switchboard by aninterconnector feeder which is to be adequately protected at the main switchboard against overload and shortcircuit and which is to be disconnected automatically at the emergency switchboard upon failure of the mainsource of electrical power. Where the system is arranged for feedback operation, the interconnector feeder is alsoto be protected at the emergency switchboard at least against short circuit5.5 In order to ensure ready availability of the emergency source of electrical power, arrangements shall be madewhere necessary to disconnect automatically non-emergency circuits from the emergency switchboard to ensurethat power shall be available to the emergency circuits.6 The emergency generator and its prime mover and any emergency accumulator battery shall be so designedand arranged as to ensure that they will function at full rated power when the ship is upright and when inclined atany angle of list up to 22.58 or when inclined up to 108 either in the fore or aft direction, or is in any combinationof angles within those limits.7 Provision shall be made for the periodic testing of the complete emergency system and shall include thetesting of automatic starting arrangements.Regulation 43Emergency source of electrical power in cargo ships1.1 A self-contained emergency source of electrical power shall be provided.1.2 The emergency source of electrical power, associated transforming equipment, if any, transitional source ofemergency power, emergency switchboard and emergency lighting switchboard shall be located above the up-permost continuous deck and shall be readily accessible from the open deck. They shall not be located forward ofthe collision bulkhead, except where permitted by the Administration in exceptional circumstances.1.3 The location of the emergency source of electrical power, associated transforming equipment, if any, thetransitional source of emergency power, the emergency switchboard and the emergency lighting switchboard inrelation to the main source of electrical power, associated transforming equipment, if any, and the mainswitchboard shall be such as to ensure to the satisfaction of the Administration that a fire or other casualty in thespace containing the main source of electrical power, associated transforming equipment, if any, and the mainswitchboard, or in any machinery space of category A will not interfere with the supply, control and distributionof emergency electrical power. As far as practicable the space containing the emergency source of electrical power,associated transforming equipment, if any, the transitional source of emergency electrical power and the emer-gency switchboard shall not be contiguous to the boundaries of machinery spaces of category A or those spacescontaining the main source of electrical power, associated transforming equipment, if any, and the mainswitchboard.1.4 Provided that suitable measures are taken for safeguarding independent emergency operation under allcircumstances, the emergency generator may be used, exceptionally, and for short periods, to supply non-emergency circuits.2 The electrical power available shall be sufficient to supply all those services that are essential for safety in anemergency, due regard being paid to such services as may have to be operated simultaneously. The emergencysource of electrical power shall be capable, having regard to starting currents and the transitory nature of certainloads, of supplying simultaneously at least the following services for the periods specified hereinafter, if theydepend upon an electrical source for their operation:2.1 For a period of 3 h, emergency lighting at every muster and embarkation station and over the sides asrequired by regulations III/11.4 and III/15.7.2.2 For a period of 18 h, emergency lighting: .1 in all service and accommodation alleyways, stairways and exits, personnel lift cars and personnel lift trunks;
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 9 .2 in the machinery spaces and main generating stations including their control positions; .3 in all control stations, machinery control rooms, and at each main and emergency switchboard; .4 at all stowage positions for firemen’s outfits; .5 at the steering gear; and .6 at the fire pump referred to in paragraph 2.5, at the sprinkler pump, if any, and at the emergency bilge pump, if any, and at the starting positions of their motors."2.3 For a period of 18 h:" .1 the navigation lights and other lights required by the International Regulations for Preventing Col- lisions at Sea in force;" .2 on ships constructed on or after 1 February 1995 the VHF radio installation required by regulation IV/ 7.1.1 and IV/7.1.2; and, if applicable:" .2.1 the MF radio installation required by regulations IV/9.1.1, IV/9.1.2, IV/10.1.2 and IV/10.1.3;" .2.2 the ship earth station required by regulation IV/10.1.1; and" .2.3 the MF/HF radio installation required by regulations IV/10.2.1, IV/10.2.2 and IV/11.1.32.4 For a period of 18 h: .1 all internal communication equipment as required in an emergency; .2 "the shipborne navigational equipment3 as required by regulation V/12; where such provision is unreasonable or impracticable the Administration may waive this requirement for ships of less than 5,000 tons gross tonnage; .3 the fire detection and fire alarm system; and .4 intermittent operation of the daylight signalling lamp, the ship’s whistle, the manually operated call points and all internal signals that are required in an emergency;unless such services have an independent supply for the period of 18 h from an accumulator battery suitablylocated for use in an emergency.2.5 For a period of 18 h one of the fire pumps required by regulation II-2/4.3.1 and 4.3.3 if dependent upon theemergency generator for its source of power.2.6.1 For the period of time required by regulation 29.14 the steering gear where it is required to be so suppliedby that regulation.2.6.2 In a ship engaged regularly in voyages of short duration, the Administration if satisfied that an adequatestandard of safety would be attained may accept a lesser period than the 18 h period specified in paragraphs 2.2 to2.5 but not less than 12 h.3 The emergency source of electrical power may be either a generator or an accumulator battery, which shallcomply with the following:3.1 Where the emergency source of electrical power is a generator, it shall be: .1 driven by a suitable prime mover with an independent supply of fuel, having a flashpoint (closed cup test) of not less than 438C; .2 started automatically upon failure of the main source of electrical power supply unless a transitional source of emergency electrical power in accordance with paragraph 3.1.3 is provided; where the emergency generator is automatically started, it shall be automatically connected to the emergency switchboard; those services referred to in paragraph 4 shall then be connected automatically to the emergency generator; and unless a second independent means of starting the emergency generator is provided the single source of stored energy shall be protected to preclude its complete depletion by the automatic starting system; and
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 10 GMDSS Handbook .3 provided with a transitional source of emergency electrical power as specified in paragraph 4 unless an emergency generator is provided capable both of supplying the services mentioned in that paragraph and of being automatically started and supplying the required load as quickly as is safe and practicable subject to a maximum of 45 s.3.2 Where the emergency source of electrical power is an accumulator battery it shall be capable of: .1 carrying the emergency electrical load without recharging while maintaining the voltage of the battery throughout the discharge period within 12% above or below its nominal voltage; .2 automatically connecting to the emergency switchboard in the event of failure of the main source of electrical power; and .3 immediately supplying at least those services specified in paragraph 4.4 The transitional source of emergency electrical power where required by paragraph 3.1.3 shall consist of anaccumulator battery suitably located for use in an emergency which shall operate without recharging whilemaintaining the voltage of the battery throughout the discharge period within 12% above or below its nominalvoltage and be of sufficient capacity and shall be so arranged as to supply automatically in the event of failure ofeither the main or the emergency source of electrical power for half an hour at least the following services if theydepend upon an electrical source for their operation: .1 "the lighting required by paragraphs 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3.1.3 For this transitional phase, the required emergency electric lighting, in respect of the machinery space and accommodation and service spaces may be provided by permanently fixed, individual, automatically charged, relay operated accumulator lamps; and .2 all services required by paragraphs 2.4.1, 2.4.3 and 2.4.4 unless such services have an independent supply for the period specified from an accumulator battery suitably located for use in an emergency.5.1 The emergency switchboard shall be installed as near as is practicable to the emergency source of electricalpower.5.2 Where the emergency source of electrical power is a generator, the emergency switchboard shall be locatedin the same space unless the operation of the emergency switchboard would thereby be impaired.5.3 No accumulator battery fitted in accordance with this regulation shall be installed in the same space as theemergency switchboard. An indicator shall be mounted in a suitable place on the main switchboard or in themachinery control room to indicate when the batteries constituting either the emergency source of electricalpower or the transitional source of electrical power referred to in paragraph 3.2 or 4 are being discharged.5.4 The emergency switchboard shall be supplied during normal operation from the main switchboard by aninterconnector feeder which is to be adequately protected at the main switchboard against overload and shortcircuit and which is to be disconnected automatically at the emergency switchboard upon failure of the mainsource of electrical power. Where the system is arranged for feedback operation, the interconnector feeder is alsoto be protected at the emergency switchboard at least against short circuit.5.5 In order to ensure ready availability of the emergency source of electrical power, arrangements shall be madewhere necessary to disconnect automatically non-emergency circuits from the emergency switchboard to ensurethat electrical power shall be available automatically to the emergency circuits.6 The emergency generator and its prime mover and any emergency accumulator battery shall be so designedand arranged as to ensure that they will function at full rated power when the ship is upright and when inclined atany angle of list up to 22.58 or when inclined up to 108 either in the fore or aft direction, or is in any combinationof angles within those limits.7 Provision shall be made for the periodic testing of the complete emergency system and shall include thetesting of automatic starting arrangements.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 11 CHAPTER III Life-saving appliances and arrangements Part A GeneralRegulation 1Application1 Unless expressly provided otherwise, this chapter shall apply to ships the keels of which are laid or which areat a similar stage of construction on or after 1 July 1986.2 For the purpose of this chapter, the term a similar stage of construction means the stage at which: .1 construction identifiable with a specific ship begins; and .2 assembly of that ship has commenced comprising at least 50 tonnes or 1% of the estimated mass of all structural material, whichever is less.3 For the purpose of this chapter: .1 the expression ships constructed means ships the keels of which are laid or which are at a similar stage of construction; .2 the expression all ships means ships constructed before, on or after 1 July 1986; the expressions all passenger ships and all cargo ships shall be construed accordingly; .3 a cargo ship, whenever built, which is converted to a passenger ship shall be treated as a passenger ship constructed on the date on which such a conversion commences.4 For ships constructed before 1 July 1986, the Administration shall: .1 ensure that, subject to the provisions of paragraph 4.2 and 4.3, the requirements which are applicable under chapter III of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, in force prior to 1 July 1986 to new or existing ships as prescribed by that chapter are complied with; .2 consider the life-saving appliances and arrangements in ships which do not comply with the re- quirements referred to in paragraph 4.1, with a view to securing, so far as this is reasonable and practicable and as early as possible, substantial compliance with those requirements; .3 ensure that when life-saving appliances or arrangements on such ships are replaced or such ships undergo repairs, alterations or modifications of a major character which involve replacement of, or any addition to, their existing life-saving appliances or arrangements, such life-saving appliances or ar- rangements, in so far as is reasonable and practicable, comply with the requirements of this chapter. However, if a survival craft is replaced without replacing its launching appliance, or vice versa, the survival craft or launching appliance may be of the same type as that replaced; .4 approve the life-saving appliances to be provided in compliance with paragraph 6. The Administration may permit those life-saving appliances provided on board ships prior to 1 July 1991 not to comply fully with the requirements of this chapter as long as they remain in a satisfactory condition; .5 except as provided for survival craft and launching appliances referred to in paragraph 4.3, ensure that life-saving appliances replaced or installed on or after 1 July 1991 are evaluated, tested and approved in accordance with the requirements of regulations 4 and 5."5 With respect to ships constructed before 1 July 1986, the requirements of regulations 8, 9, 10, 18, 21.3,21.4, 25, 26.3, 27.2, 27.3 and 30.2.7 and, to the extent prescribed therein, regulation 19 shall apply."6 With respect to ships constructed before 1 February 1992, regulation 6.2 shall apply not later than 1February 1995.3
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 12 GMDSS Handbook Part B Ship requirements SECTION I – PASSENGER SHIPS AND CARGO SHIPSRegulation 6Communications"1 Paragraph 2 applies to all passenger ships and to all cargo ships of 300 tons gross tonnage and upwards. Withrespect to ships constructed before 1 February 1992, paragraph 2 shall apply not later than 1 February 1995.However, ships other than cargo ships of 300 tons gross tonnage and upwards but less than 500 tons gross tonnagewhich do not comply with paragraph 2 shall comply with all applicable requirements* of chapter III of theInternational Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, in force prior to 1 February 1992.3" 2 Radio life-saving appliances" 2.1 Two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus"2.1.1 At least three two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus shall be provided on every passenger ship and onevery cargo ship of 500 tons gross tonnage and upwards. At least two two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatusshall be provided on every cargo ship of 300 tons gross tonnage and upwards but less than 500 tons gross tonnage.Such apparatus shall conform to performance standards not inferior to those adopted by the Organization.{ If afixed two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus is fitted in a survival craft it shall conform to performance standardsnot inferior to those adopted by the Organization.{"2.1.2 Two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus provided on board ships prior to 1 February 1992 and notcomplying fully with the performance standards adopted by the Organization may be accepted by the Admin-istration until 1 February 1999 provided the Administration is satisfied that they are compatible with approvedtwo-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus." 2.2 Radar transponders"At least one radar transponder shall be carried on each side of every passenger ship and of every cargo ship of 500tons gross tonnage and upwards. At least one radar transponder shall be carried on every cargo ship of 300 tonsgross tonnage and upwards but less than 500 tons gross tonnage. Such radar transponders shall conform toperformance standards not inferior to those adopted by the Organization.{ The radar transponders} shall bestowed in such locations that they can be rapidly placed in any survival craft other than the liferaft or liferaftsrequired by regulation 26.1.4. Alternatively, one radar transponder shall be stowed in each survival craft otherthan those required by regulation 26.1.4.33 Distress flaresNot less than 12 rocket parachute flares, complying with the requirements of regulation 35, shall be carried and bestowed on or near the navigating bridge.4 On-board communications and alarm systems4.1 An emergency means comprising either fixed or portable equipment or both shall be provided for two-waycommunications between emergency control stations, muster and embarkation stations and strategic positions onboard.* Regulations III/6.2.3 and 6.2.4 and, as applicable, regulations III/6.2.1, 6.2.2, 10.6, 38.3.2, 41.7.8 and 42.5 in force prior to 1 February 1992 (1983SOLAS amendments). See also resolution 4 of the 1988 GMDSS Conference (see annex 1-4).{ Refer to the Recommendation on Performance Standards for Survival Craft Portable Two-Way VHF Radiotelephone Apparatus, adopted by theOrganization by resolution A.809(19) (see annex 3-6-2).{ Refer to the Recommendation on Performance Standards for Survival Craft Radar Transponders for Use in Search and Rescue Operations,adopted by the Organization by resolution A.802(19) (see annex 3-6-1).} One of these radar transponders may be the radar transponder required by regulation IV/7.1.3.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 134.2 A general emergency alarm system complying with the requirements of regulation 50 shall be provided andshall be used for summoning passengers and crew to muster stations and to initiate the actions included in themuster list. The system shall be supplemented by either a public address system or other suitable means ofcommunication.Regulation 10Manning of survival craft and supervision1 This regulation applies to all ships.2 There shall be a sufficient number of trained persons on board for mustering and assisting untrained persons.3 There shall be a sufficient number of crew members, who may be deck officers or certificated persons, onboard for operating the survival craft and launching arrangements required for abandonment by the total numberof persons on board.4 A deck officer or certificated person shall be placed in charge of each survival craft to be used. However, theAdministration, having due regard to the nature of the voyage, the number of persons on board and thecharacteristics of the ship, may permit persons practised in the handling and operation of liferafts to be placed incharge of liferafts in lieu of persons qualified as above. A second-in-command shall also be nominated in the caseof lifeboats.5 The person in charge of the survival craft shall have a list of the survival craft crew and shall see that the crewunder his command are acquainted with their duties. In lifeboats the second-in-command shall also have a list ofthe lifeboat crew."63 Every motorized survival craft shall have a person assigned who is capable of operating the engine andcarrying out minor adjustments."73 The master shall ensure the equitable distribution of persons referred to in paragraphs 2, 3 and 4 among theship’s survival craft. Part C Life-saving appliance requirements SECTION IV – SURVIVAL CRAFTRegulation 38General requirements for liferafts(. . .)3 Liferaft fittings3.1 Lifelines shall be securely becketed around the inside and outside of the liferaft."3.23 The liferaft shall be fitted with an efficient painter of length equal to not less than twice the distance fromthe stowed position to the waterline in the lightest seagoing condition or 15 m whichever is the greater.4 Davit-launched liferafts4.1 In addition to the above requirements, a liferaft for use with an approved launching appliance shall: .1 when the liferaft is loaded with its full complement of persons and equipment, be capable of with- standing a lateral impact against the ship’s side at an impact velocity of not less than 3.5 m/s and also a drop into the water from a height of not less than 3 m without damage that will affect its function; .2 be provided with means for bringing the liferaft alongside the embarkation deck and holding it securely during embarkation.
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 14 GMDSS Handbook4.2 Every passenger ship davit-launched liferaft shall be so arranged that it can be rapidly boarded by its fullcomplement of persons.4.3 Every cargo ship davit-launched liferaft shall be so arranged that it can be boarded by its full complement ofpersons in not more than 3 min from the time the instruction to board is given.5 Equipment5.1 The normal equipment of every liferaft shall consist of: .1 one buoyant rescue quoit, attached to not less than 30 m of buoyant line; .2 one knife of the non-folding type having a buoyant handle and lanyard attached and stowed in a pocket on the exterior of the canopy near the point at which the painter is attached to the liferaft. In addition, a liferaft which is permitted to accommodate 13 persons or more shall be provided with a second knife which need not be of the non-folding type; .3 for a liferaft which is permitted to accommodate not more than 12 persons, one buoyant bailer. For a liferaft which is permitted to accommodate 13 persons or more, two buoyant bailers; .4 two sponges; .5 two sea-anchors each with a shock-resistant hawser and tripping line, one being spare and the other permanently attached to the liferaft in such a way that when the liferaft inflates or is waterborne it will cause the liferaft to lie oriented to the wind in the most stable manner. The strength of each sea-anchor and its hawser and tripping line shall be adequate for all sea conditions. The sea-anchors shall be fitted with a swivel at each end of the line and shall be of a type which is unlikely to turn inside-out between its shroud lines; .6 two buoyant paddles; .7 three tin-openers (safety knives containing special tin-opener blades are satisfactory for this require- ment); .8 one first-aid outfit in a waterproof case capable of being closed tightly after use; .9 one whistle or equivalent sound signal; .10 four rocket parachute flares complying with the requirements of regulation 35; .11 six hand flares complying with the requirements of regulation 36; .12 two buoyant smoke signals complying with the requirements of regulation 37; .13 one waterproof electric torch suitable for Morse signalling, together with one spare set of batteries and one spare bulb in a waterproof container;" .14 an efficient radar reflector, unless a survival craft radar transponder is stowed in the liferaft;3 .15 one daylight signalling mirror with instructions on its use for signalling to ships and aircraft; .16 one copy of the life-saving signals referred to in regulation V/16 on a waterproof card or in a water- proof container; .17 one set of fishing tackle; .18 a food ration totalling not less than 10,000 kJ for each person the liferaft is permitted to accommodate; these rations shall be kept in airtight packaging and be stowed in a watertight container; .19 watertight receptacles containing a total of 1.5 l of fresh water for each person the liferaft is permitted to accommodate, of which 0.5 l per person may be replaced by a de-salting apparatus capable of producing an equal amount of fresh water in 2 days; .20 one rustproof graduated drinking vessel; .21 six doses of anti-seasickness medicine and one seasickness bag for each person the liferaft is permitted to accommodate; .22 instructions on how to survive; .23 instructions for immediate action;
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 15 .24 thermal protective aids complying with the requirements of regulation 34 sufficient for 10% of the number of persons the liferaft is permitted to accommodate or two, whichever is the greater.5.2 The marking required by regulations 39.7.3.5 and 40.7.7 on liferafts equipped in accordance with paragraph5.1 shall be SOLAS A PACK in block capitals of the Roman alphabet.5.3 In the case of passenger ships engaged on short international voyages of such a nature and duration that, inthe opinion of the Administration, not all the items specified in paragraph 5.1 are necessary, the Administrationmay allow the liferafts carried on any such ships to be provided with the equipment specified in paragraphs 5.1.1to 5.1.6 inclusive, 5.1.8, 5.1.9, 5.1.13 to 5.1.16 inclusive and 5.1.21 to 5.1.24 inclusive and one half of theequipment specified in paragraphs 5.1.10 to 5.1.12 inclusive. The marking required by regulations 39.7.3.5 and40.7.7 on such liferaft shall be SOLAS B PACK in block capitals of the Roman alphabet.5.4 Where appropriate the equipment shall be stowed in a container which, if it is not an integral part of, orpermanently attached to, the liferaft, shall be stowed and secured inside the liferaft and be capable of floating inwater for at least 30 min without damage to its contents.(. . .)Regulation 41General requirements for lifeboats(. . .)7 Lifeboat fittings7.1 All lifeboats shall be provided with at least one drain valve fitted near the lowest point in the hull, whichshall automatically open to drain water from the hull when the lifeboat is not waterborne and shall automaticallyclose to prevent entry of water when the lifeboat is waterborne. Each drain valve shall be provided with a cap orplug to close the valve, which shall be attached to the lifeboat by a lanyard, a chain, or other suitable means. Drainvalves shall be readily accessible from inside the lifeboat and their position shall be clearly indicated.7.2 All lifeboats shall be provided with a rudder and tiller. When a wheel or other remote steering mechanism isalso provided, the tiller shall be capable of controlling the rudder in case of failure of the steering mechanism. Therudder shall be permanently attached to the lifeboat. The tiller shall be permanently installed on, or linked to, therudder stock; however, if the lifeboat has a remote steering mechanism, the tiller may be removable and securelystowed near the rudder stock. The rudder and tiller shall be so arranged as not to be damaged by operation of therelease mechanism or the propeller.7.3 Except in the vicinity of the rudder and propeller, a buoyant lifeline shall be becketed around the outside ofthe lifeboat.7.4 Lifeboats which are not self-righting when capsized shall have suitable handholds on the underside of thehull to enable persons to cling to the lifeboat. The handholds shall be fastened to the lifeboat in such a way that,when subjected to an impact sufficient to cause them to break away from the lifeboat, they break away withoutdamaging the lifeboat.7.5 All lifeboats shall be fitted with sufficient watertight lockers or compartments to provide for the storage ofthe small items of equipment, water and provisions required by paragraph 8. Means shall be provided for thestorage of collected rainwater.7.6 Every lifeboat to be launched by a fall or falls shall be fitted with a release mechanism complying with thefollowing requirements: .1 The mechanism shall be so arranged that all hooks are released simultaneously. .2 The mechanism shall have two release capabilities as follows: .2.1 a normal release capability which will release the lifeboat when it is waterborne or when there is no load on the hooks; .2.2 an on-load release capability which will release the lifeboat with a load on the hooks. This release shall be so arranged as to release the lifeboat under any conditions of loading from no-load with the lifeboat waterborne to a load of 1.1 times the total mass of the lifeboat when loaded with its full
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 16 GMDSS Handbook complement of persons and equipment. This release capability shall be adequately protected against accidental or premature use. .3 The release control shall be clearly marked in a colour that contrasts with its surroundings. .4 The mechanism shall be designed with a factor of safety of 6 based on the ultimate strength of the materials used, assuming the mass of the lifeboat is equally distributed between the falls.7.7 Every lifeboat shall be fitted with a release device to enable the forward painter to be released when undertension."7.8 Every lifeboat which is fitted with a fixed two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus with an antenna whichis separately mounted shall be provided with arrangements for siting and securing the antenna effectively in itsoperating position.37.9 Lifeboats intended for launching down the side of a ship shall have skates and fenders as necessary tofacilitate launching and prevent damage to the lifeboat.7.10 A manually controlled lamp visible on a dark night with a clear atmosphere at a distance of at least 2 milesfor a period of not less than 12 h shall be fitted to the top of the cover or enclosure. If the light is a flashing light, itshall initially flash at a rate of not less than 50 flashes per minute over the first 2 h of operation of the 12 hoperating period.7.11 A lamp or source of light shall be fitted inside the lifeboat to provide illumination for not less than 12 h toenable reading of survival and equipment instructions; however, oil lamps shall not be permitted for this purpose.7.12 Unless expressly provided otherwise, every lifeboat shall be provided with effective means of bailing or beautomatically self-bailing.7.13 Every lifeboat shall be so arranged that an adequate view forward, aft and to both sides is provided from thecontrol and steering position for safe launching and manoeuvring.8 Lifeboat equipmentAll items of lifeboat equipment, whether required by this paragraph or elsewhere in this chapter, with theexception of boat-hooks which shall be kept free for fending off purposes, shall be secured within the lifeboat bylashings, storage in lockers or compartments, storage in brackets or similar mounting arrangements or othersuitable means. The equipment shall be secured in such a manner as not to interfere with any abandonmentprocedures. All items of lifeboat equipment shall be as small and of as little mass as possible and shall be packed ina suitable and compact form. Except where otherwise stated, the normal equipment of every lifeboat shall consistof: .1 sufficient buoyant oars to make headway in calm seas. Thole pins, crutches or equivalent arrangements shall be provided for each oar provided. Thole pins or crutches shall be attached to the boat by lanyards or chains; .2 two boat-hooks; .3 a buoyant bailer and two buckets; .4 a survival manual; .5 a binnacle containing an efficient compass which is luminous or provided with suitable means of illumination. In a totally enclosed lifeboat, the binnacle shall be permanently fitted at the steering position; in any other lifeboat, it shall be provided with suitable mounting arrangements; .6 a sea-anchor of adequate size fitted with a shock-resistant hawser and a tripping line which provides a firm hand grip when wet. The strength of the sea-anchor, hawser and tripping line shall be adequate for all sea conditions; .7 two efficient painters of a length equal to not less than twice the distance from the stowage position of the lifeboat to the waterline in the lightest seagoing condition or 15 m, whichever is the greater. One painter attached to the release device required by regulation 41.7.7 shall be placed at the forward end of the lifeboat and the other shall be firmly secured at or near the bow of the lifeboat ready for use; .8 two hatchets, one at each end of the lifeboat;
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 17 .9 watertight receptacles containing a total of 3 l of fresh water for each person the lifeboat is permitted to accommodate, of which 1 l per person may be replaced by a de-salting apparatus capable of producing an equal amount of fresh water in 2 days; .10 a rustproof dipper with lanyard; .11 a rustproof graduated drinking vessel; .12 a food ration totalling not less than 10,000 kJ for each person the lifeboat is permitted to accom- modate; these rations shall be kept in airtight packaging and be stowed in a watertight container; .13 four rocket parachute flares complying with the requirements of regulation 35; .14 six hand flares complying with the requirements of regulation 36; .15 two buoyant smoke signals complying with the requirements of regulation 37; .16 one waterproof electric torch suitable for Morse signalling, together with one spare set of batteries and one spare bulb in a waterproof container; .17 one daylight signalling mirror with instructions for its use for signalling to ships and aircraft; .18 one copy of the life-saving signals referred to in regulation V/16 on a waterproof card or in a water- proof container; .19 one whistle or equivalent sound signal; .20 a first-aid outfit in a waterproof case capable of being closed tightly after use; .21 six doses of anti-seasickness medicine and one seasickness bag for each person; .22 a jack-knife to be kept attached to the boat by a lanyard; .23 three tin-openers; .24 two buoyant rescue quoits, attached to not less than 30 m of buoyant line; .25 a manual pump; .26 one set of fishing tackle; .27 sufficient tools for minor adjustments to the engine and its accessories; .28 portable fire-extinguishing equipment suitable for extinguishing oil fires; .29 a searchlight capable of effectively illuminating a light-coloured object at night having a width of 18 m at a distance of 180 m for a total period of 6 h and of working for not less than 3 h continuously;" .30 an efficient radar reflector, unless a survival craft radar transponder is stowed in the lifeboat;3 .31 thermal protective aids complying with the requirements of regulation 34 sufficient for 10% of the number of persons the lifeboat is permitted to accommodate or two, whichever is the greater; .32 in the case of ships engaged on voyages of such a nature and duration that, in the opinion of the Administration, the items specified in paragraphs 8.12 and 8.26 are unnecessary, the Administration may allow these items to be dispensed with.9 Lifeboat markings9.1 The dimensions of the lifeboat and the number of persons which it is permitted to accommodate shall bemarked on it in clear permanent characters.9.2 The name and port of registry of the ship to which the lifeboat belongs shall be marked on each side of thelifeboat’s bow in block capitals of the Roman alphabet.9.3 Means of identifying the ship to which the lifeboat belongs and the number of the lifeboat shall be marked insuch a way that they are visible from above.
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 18 GMDSS HandbookRegulation 42Partially enclosed lifeboats1 Partially enclosed lifeboats shall comply with the requirements of regulation 41 and in addition shall complywith the requirements of this regulation.2 Every partially enclosed lifeboat shall be provided with effective means of bailing or be automatically self-bailing.3 Partially enclosed lifeboats shall be provided with permanently attached rigid covers extending over not lessthan 20% of the length of the lifeboat from the stem and not less than 20% of the length of the lifeboat from theaftermost part of the lifeboat. The lifeboat shall be fitted with a permanently attached foldable canopy whichtogether with the rigid covers completely encloses the occupants of the lifeboat in a weatherproof shelter andprotects them from exposure. The canopy shall be so arranged that: .1 it is provided with adequate rigid sections or battens to permit erection of the canopy; .2 it can be easily erected by not more than two persons; .3 it is insulated to protect the occupants against heat and cold by means of not less than two layers of material separated by an air gap or other equally efficient means; means shall be provided to prevent accumulation of water in the air gap; .4 its exterior is of a highly visible colour and its interior is of a colour which does not cause discomfort to the occupants; .5 it has entrances at both ends and on each side, provided with efficient adjustable closing arrangements which can be easily and quickly opened and closed from inside or outside so as to permit ventilation but exclude seawater, wind and cold; means shall be provided for holding the entrances securely in the open and closed position; .6 with the entrances closed, it admits sufficient air for the occupants at all times; .7 it has means for collecting rainwater; .8 the occupants can escape in the event of the lifeboat capsizing.4 The interior of the lifeboat shall be of a highly visible colour."5 If a fixed two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus is fitted in the lifeboat, it shall be installed in a cabin largeenough to accommodate both the equipment and the person using it. No separate cabin is required if theconstruction of the lifeboat provides a sheltered space to the satisfaction of the Administration.3 CHAPTER IV "Radiocommunications Part A GeneralRegulation 1Application1 This chapter applies to all ships to which the present regulations apply and to cargo ships of 300 tons grosstonnage and upwards.2 This chapter does not apply to ships to which the present regulations would otherwise apply while suchships are being navigated within the Great Lakes of North America and their connecting and tributary waters asfar east as the lower exit of the St Lambert Lock at Montreal in the Province of Quebec, Canada.** Such ships are subject to special requirements relative to radio for safety purposes, as contained in the relevant agreement between Canada and theUnited States of America.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 19"3 For the purpose of this chapter: .1 the expression ships constructed means ships the keels of which are laid or which are at a similar stage of construction; .2 the expression a similar stage of construction means the stage at which: .2.1 construction identifiable with a specific ship begins; and .2.2 assembly of that ship has commenced comprising at least 50 tonnes or 1% of the estimated mass of all structural material, whichever is less.4 Every ship shall comply with regulations 7.1.4 (NAVTEX) and 7.1.6 (satellite EPIRB) not later than1 August 1993.5 Subject to the provisions of paragraph 4, the Administration shall ensure that every ship constructed before1 February 1995: .1 during the period between 1 February 1992 and 1 February 1999: .1.1 either complies with all applicable requirements of this chapter; or .1.2 complies with all applicable requirements of chapter IV of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, in force prior to 1 February 1992; and .2 after 1 February 1999, complies with all the applicable requirements of this chapter.6 Every ship constructed on or after 1 February 1995 shall comply with all the applicable requirements of thischapter.7 No provision in this chapter shall prevent the use by any ship, survival craft or person in distress, of anymeans at their disposal to attract attention, make known their position and obtain help.Regulation 2Terms and definitions1 For the purpose of this chapter, the following terms shall have the meanings defined below: .1 Bridge-to-bridge communications means safety communications between ships from the position from which the ships are normally navigated. .2 Continuous watch means that the radio watch concerned shall not be interrupted other than for brief intervals when the ship’s receiving capability is impaired or blocked by its own communications or when the facilities are under periodical maintenance or checks. .3 Digital selective calling (DSC) means a technique using digital codes which enables a radio station to establish contact with, and transfer information to, another station or group of stations, and complying with the relevant recommendations of the International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR). .4 Direct-printing telegraphy means automated telegraphy techniques which comply with the relevant re- commendations of the International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR). .5 General radiocommunications means operational and public correspondence traffic, other than distress, urgency and safety messages, conducted by radio. .6 INMARSAT means the Organization established by the Convention on the International Maritime Satellite Organization (INMARSAT) adopted on 3 September 1976. .7 International NAVTEX service means the co-ordinated broadcast and automatic reception on 518 kHz of maritime safety information by means of narrow-band direct-printing telegraphy using the English language.* .8 Locating means the finding of ships, aircraft, units or persons in distress.* Refer to the NAVTEX Manual approved by the Organization (see annex 4-2).
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 20 GMDSS Handbook" .9 Maritime safety information means navigational and meteorological warnings, meteorological forecasts and other urgent safety related messages broadcast to ships. .10 Polar orbiting satellite service means a service which is based on polar orbiting satellites which receive and relay distress alerts from satellite EPIRBs and which provides their position. .11 Radio Regulations means the Radio Regulations annexed to, or regarded as being annexed to, the most recent International Telecommunication Convention which is in force at any time. .12 Sea area A1 means an area within the radiotelephone coverage of at least one VHF coast station in which continuous DSC alerting is available, as may be defined by a Contracting Government.* .13 Sea area A2 means an area, excluding sea area A1, within the radiotelephone coverage of at least one MF coast station in which continous DSC alerting is available, as may be defined by a Contracting Government.** .14 Sea area A3 means an area, excluding sea areas A1 and A2, within the coverage of an INMARSAT geostationary satellite in which continuous alerting is available. .15 Sea area A4 means an area outside sea areas A1, A2 and A3.2 All other terms and abbreviations which are used in this chapter and which are defined in the RadioRegulations shall have the meanings as defined in those Regulations.Regulation 3Exemptions1 The Contracting Governments consider it highly desirable not to deviate from the requirements of thischapter; nevertheless the Administration may grant partial or conditional exemptions to individual ships from therequirements of regulations 7 to 11 provided: .1 such ships comply with the functional requirements of regulation 4; and .2 the Administration has taken into account the effect such exemptions may have upon the general efficiency of the service for the safety of all ships.2 An exemption may be granted under paragraph 1 only: .1 if the conditions affecting safety are such as to render the full application of regulations 7 to 11 unreasonable or unnecessary; .2 in exceptional circumstances, for a single voyage outside the sea area or sea areas for which the ship is equipped; or .3 prior to 1 February 1999, when the ship will be taken permanently out of service within two years of a date prescribed by regulation 1 for the application of a requirement of this chapter.3 Each Administration shall submit to the Organization, as soon as possible after the first of January in eachyear, a report showing all exemptions granted under paragraphs 1 and 2 during the previous calendar year andgiving the reasons for granting such exemptions.Regulation 4Functional requirements1 Every ship, while at sea, shall be capable: .1 except as provided in regulations 8.1.1 and 10.1.4.3, of transmitting ship-to-shore distress alerts by at least two separate and independent means, each using a different radiocommunication service; .2 of receiving shore-to-ship distress alerts; .3 of transmitting and receiving ship-to-ship distress alerts;* Refer to resolution A.801(19) concerning the provision of radio services for the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS), adopted bythe Organization (see annex 2-16).
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 21" .4 of transmitting and receiving search and rescue co-ordinating communications; .5 of transmitting and receiving on-scene communications; .6 of transmitting and, as required by regulation V/12(g) and (h), receiving signals for locating;* .7 of transmitting and receiving{ maritime safety information; .8 of transmitting and receiving general radiocommunications to and from shore-based radio systems or networks subject to regulation 15.8; and .9 of transmitting and receiving bridge-to-bridge communications. Part B Undertakings by Contracting Governments{Regulation 5Provision of radiocommunication services1 Each Contracting Government undertakes to make available, as it deems practical and necessary eitherindividually or in co-operation with other Contracting Governments, appropriate shore-based facilities for spaceand terrestrial radiocommunication services having due regard to the recommendations of the Organization.}These services are: .1 a radiocommunication service utilizing geostationary satellites in the maritime mobile-satellite service; .2 a radiocommunication service utilizing polar orbiting satellites in the mobile-satellite service; .3 the maritime mobile service in the bands between 156 MHz and 174 MHz; .4 the maritime mobile service in the bands between 4,000 kHz and 27,500 kHz; and .5 the maritime mobile service in the bands between 415 kHz and 535 kHz and between 1,605 kHz and 4,000 kHz.2 Each Contracting Government undertakes to provide the Organization with pertinent information con-cerning the shore-based facilities in the maritime mobile service, mobile-satellite service and maritime mobile-satellite service, established for sea areas which it has designated off its coasts. Part C Ship requirementsRegulation 6Radio installations1 Every ship shall be provided with radio installations capable of complying with the functional requirementsprescribed by regulation 4 throughout its intended voyage and, unless exempted under regulation 3, complyingwith the requirements of regulation 7 and, as appropriate for the sea area or areas through which it will pass duringits intended voyage, the requirements of either regulation 8, 9, 10 or 11.2 Every radio installation shall: .1 be so located that no harmful interference of mechanical, electrical or other origin affects its proper use, and so as to ensure electromagnetic compatibility and avoidance of harmful interaction with other equipment and systems;* Refer to resolution A.614(15) concerning carriage of radar operating in the frequency band 9,300–9,500 MHz adopted by the Organization (seeannex 2-4).{ It should be noted that ships may have a need for reception of certain maritime safety information while in port.{ 1 Each Contracting Government is not required to provide all radiocommunication services. 2 The requirements should be specified for shore-based facilities to cover the various sea areas.} Refer to resolution A.801(19) concerning the provision of radio services for the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) adopted by theOrganization (see annex 2-16).
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 22 GMDSS Handbook" .2 be so located as to ensure the greatest possible degree of safety and operational availability; .3 be protected against harmful effects of water, extremes of temperature and other adverse environ- mental conditions; .4 be provided with reliable, permanently arranged electrical lighting, independent of the main and emergency sources of electrical power, for the adequate illumination of the radio controls for operating the radio installation; and .5 be clearly marked with the call sign, the ship station identity and other codes as applicable for the use of the radio installation.3 Control of the VHF radiotelephone channels, required for navigational safety, shall be immediately availableon the navigating bridge convenient to the conning position and, where necessary, facilities should be available topermit radiocommunications from the wings of the navigating bridge. Portable VHF equipment may be used tomeet the latter provision.Regulation 7Radio equipment: General1 Every ship shall be provided with: .1 a VHF radio installation capable of transmitting and receiving: .1.1 DSC on the frequency 156.525 MHz (channel 70). It shall be possible to initiate the transmission of distress alerts on channel 70 from the position from which the ship is normally navigated;* and .1.2 radiotelephony on the frequencies 156.300 MHz (channel 6), 156.650 MHz (channel 13) and 156.800 MHz (channel 16); .2 a radio installation capable of maintaining a continuous DSC watch on VHF channel 70 which may be separate from, or combined with, that required by subparagraph 1.1;* .3 a radar transponder capable of operating in the 9 GHz band, which: .3.1 shall be so stowed that it can be easily utilized; and .3.2 may be one of those required by regulation III/6.2.2 for a survival craft; .4 a receiver capable of receiving international NAVTEX service broadcasts if the ship is engaged on voyages in any area in which an international NAVTEX service is provided; .5 a radio facility for reception of maritime safety information by the INMARSAT enhanced group calling system if the ship is engaged on voyages in any area of INMARSAT coverage but in which an international NAVTEX service is not provided. However, ships engaged exclusively on voyages in areas where an HF direct-printing telegraphy maritime safety information service is provided and fitted with equipment capable of receiving such service, may be exempt from this requirement.{ .6 subject to the provisions of regulation 8.3, a satellite emergency position-indicating radio beacon (satellite EPIRB) which shall be: .6.1 capable of transmitting a distress alert either through the polar orbiting satellite service operating in the 406 MHz band or, if the ship is engaged only on voyages within INMARSAT coverage, through the INMARSAT geostationary satellite service operating in the 1.6 GHz band;{ .6.2 installed in an easily accessible position; .6.3 ready to be manually released and capable of being carried by one person into a survival craft; .6.4 capable of floating free if the ship sinks and of being automatically activated when afloat; and .6.5 capable of being activated manually.* Certain ships may be exempted from this requirement (see regulation 9.4).{ Refer to resolution A.705(17) concerning promulgation of maritime safety information, adopted by the Organization (see annex 2-12).{ Subject to the availability of appropriate receiving and processing ground facilities for each ocean region covered by INMARSAT satellites (seeannex 5 – GMDSS Master Plan).
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 23"2 Until 1 February 1999 or until such other date as may be determined by the Maritime Safety Committee,every ship shall, in addition, be fitted with a radio installation consisting of a radiotelephone distress frequencywatch receiver capable of operating on 2,182 kHz.3 Until 1 February 1999, every ship shall, unless the ship is engaged on voyages in sea area A1 only, be fittedwith a device for generating the radiotelephone alarm signal on the frequency 2,182 kHz.4 The Administration may exempt ships constructed on or after 1 February 1997 from the requirementsprescribed by paragraphs 2 and 3.Regulation 8Radio equipment – Sea area A11 In addition to meeting the requirements of regulation 7, every ship engaged on voyages exclusively in seaarea A1 shall be provided with a radio installation capable of initiating the transmission of ship-to-shore distressalerts from the position from which the ship is normally navigated, operating either: .1 on VHF using DSC; this requirement may be fulfilled by the EPIRB prescribed by paragraph 3, either by installing the EPIRB close to, or by remote activation from, the position from which the ship is normally navigated; or .2 through the polar orbiting satellite service on 406 MHz; this requirement may be fulfilled by the satellite EPIRB, required by regulation 7.1.6, either by installing the satellite EPIRB close to, or by remote activation from, the position from which the ship is normally navigated; or .3 if the ship is engaged on voyages within coverage of MF coast stations equipped with DSC, on MF using DSC; or .4 on HF using DSC; or .5 through the INMARSAT geostationary satellite service; this requirement may be fulfilled by: .5.1 an INMARSAT ship earth station;* or .5.2 the satellite EPIRB, required by regulation 7.1.6, either by installing the satellite EPIRB close to, or by remote activation from, the position from which the ship is normally navigated.2 The VHF radio installation, required by regulation 7.1.1, shall also be capable of transmitting and receivinggeneral radiocommunications using radiotelephony.3 Ships engaged on voyages exclusively in sea area A1 may carry, in lieu of the satellite EPIRB required byregulation 7.1.6, an EPIRB which shall be: .1 capable of transmitting a distress alert using DSC on VHF channel 70 and providing for locating by means of a radar transponder operating in the 9 GHz band; .2 installed in an easily accessible position; .3 ready to be manually released and capable of being carried by one person into a survival craft; .4 capable of floating free if the ship sinks and being automatically activated when afloat; and .5 capable of being activated manually.Regulation 9"Radio equipment – Sea areas A1 and A21 In addition to meeting the requirements of regulation 7, every ship engaged on voyages beyond sea area A1,but remaining within sea area A2, shall be provided with: .1 an MF radio installation capable of transmitting and receiving, for distress and safety purposes, on the frequencies:* This requirement can be met by INMARSAT ship earth stations capable of two-way communications, such as Inmarsat-A or Inmarsat-C shipearth stations. Unless otherwise specified, this footnote applies to all requirements for an INMARSAT ship earth station prescribed by this chapter(see annexes 3-4-1 and 3-4-2).
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 24 GMDSS Handbook" .1.1 2,187.5 kHz using DSC; and .1.2 2,182 kHz using radiotelephony; .2 a radio installation capable of maintaining a continuous DSC watch on the frequency 2,187.5 kHz which may be separate from, or combined with, that required by subparagraph .1.1; and .3 means of initiating the transmission of ship-to-shore distress alerts by a radio service other than MF operating either: .3.1 through the polar orbiting satellite service on 406 MHz; this requirement may be fulfilled by the satellite EPIRB, required by regulation 7.1.6, either by installing the satellite EPIRB close to, or by remote activation from, the position from which the ship is normally navigated; or .3.2 on HF using DSC; or .3.3 through the INMARSAT geostationary satellite service; this requirement may be fulfilled by: .3.3.1 the equipment specified in paragraph 3.2; or .3.3.2 the satellite EPIRB, required by regulation 7.1.6, either by installing the satellite EPIRB close to, or by remote activation from, the position from which the ship is normally navigated.2 It shall be possible to initiate transmission of distress alerts by the radio installations specified in paragraphs1.1 and 1.3 from the position from which the ship is normally navigated.3 The ship shall, in addition, be capable of transmitting and receiving general radiocommunications usingradiotelephony or direct-printing telegraphy by either: .1 a radio installation operating on working frequencies in the bands between 1,605 kHz and 4,000 kHz or between 4,000 kHz and 27,500 kHz. This requirement may be fulfilled by the addition of this capability in the equipment required by paragraph 1.1; or .2 an INMARSAT ship earth station.4 The Administration may exempt ships constructed before 1 February 1997, which are engaged exclusivelyon voyages within sea area A2, from the requirements of regulations 7.1.1.1 and 7.1.2 provided such shipsmaintain, when practicable, a continuous listening watch on VHF channel 16. This watch shall be kept at theposition from which the ship is normally navigated.Regulation 10Radio equipment – Sea areas A1, A2 and A31 In addition to meeting the requirements of regulation 7, every ship engaged on voyages beyond sea areas A1and A2, but remaining within sea area A3, shall, if it does not comply with the requirements of paragraph 2, beprovided with: .1 an INMARSAT ship earth station capable of: .1.1 transmitting and receiving distress and safety communications using direct-printing telegraphy; .1.2 initiating and receiving distress priority calls; .1.3 maintaining watch for shore-to-ship distress alerts, including those directed to specifically defined geographical areas; .1.4 transmitting and receiving general radiocommunications, using either radiotelephony or direct- printing telegraphy; and .2 an MF radio installation capable of transmitting and receiving, for distress and safety purposes, on the frequencies: .2.1 2,187.5 kHz using DSC; and .2.2 2,182 kHz using radiotelephony; and .3 a radio installation capable of maintaining a continuous DSC watch on the frequency 2,187.5 kHz which may be separate from, or combined with, that required by subparagraph .2.1; and
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 25" .4 means of initiating the transmission of ship-to-shore distress alerts by a radio service operating either: .4.1 through the polar orbiting satellite service on 406 MHz; this requirement may be fulfilled by the satellite EPIRB, required by regulation 7.1.6, either by installing the satellite EPIRB close to, or by remote activation from, the position from which the ship is normally navigated; or .4.2 on HF using DSC; or .4.3 through the INMARSAT geostationary satellite service, by an additional ship earth station or by the satellite EPIRB required by regulation 7.1.6, either by installing the satellite EPIRB close to, or by remote activation from, the position from which the ship is normally navigated.2 In addition to meeting the requirements of regulation 7, every ship engaged on voyages beyond sea areas A1and A2, but remaining within sea area A3, shall, if it does not comply with the requirements of paragraph 1, beprovided with: .1 an MF/HF radio installation capable of transmitting and receiving, for distress and safety purposes, on all distress and safety frequencies in the bands between 1,605 kHz and 4,000 kHz and between 4,000 kHz and 27,500 kHz: .1.1 using DSC; .1.2 using radiotelephony; and .1.3 using direct-printing telegraphy; and .2 equipment capable of maintaining DSC watch on 2,187.5 kHz, 8,414.5 kHz and on at least one of the distress and safety DSC frequencies 4,207.5 kHz, 6,312 kHz, 12,577 kHz or 16,804.5 kHz; at any time, it shall be possible to select any of these DSC distress and safety frequencies. This equipment may be separate from, or combined with, the equipment required by subparagraph .1; and .3 means of initiating the transmission of ship-to-shore distress alerts by a radiocommunication service other than HF operating either: .3.1 through the polar orbiting satellite service on 406 MHz; this requirement may be fulfilled by the satellite EPIRB, required by regulation 7.1.6, either by installing the satellite EPIRB close to, or by remote activation from, the position from which the ship is normally navigated; or .3.2 through the INMARSAT geostationary satellite service; this requirement may be fulfilled by: .3.2.1 an INMARSAT ship earth station; or .3.2.2 the satellite EPIRB, required by regulation 7.1.6, either by installing the satellite EPIRB close to, or by remote activation from, the position from which the ship is normally navigated; and .4 in addition, ships shall be capable of transmitting and receiving general radiocommunications using radiotelephony or direct-printing telegraphy by an MF/HF radio installation operating on working frequencies in the bands between 1,605 kHz and 4,000 kHz and between 4,000 kHz and 27,500 kHz. This requirement may be fulfilled by the addition of this capability in the equipment required by subparagraph .1.3 It shall be possible to initiate transmission of distress alerts by the radio installations specified in sub-paragraphs 1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 2.1 and 2.3 from the position from which the ship is normally navigated.4 The Administration may exempt ships constructed before 1 February 1997, and engaged exclusively onvoyages within sea areas A2 and A3, from the requirements of regulations 7.1.1.1 and 7.1.2 provided such shipsmaintain, when practicable, a continuous listening watch on VHF channel 16. This watch shall be kept at theposition from which the ship is normally navigated.
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 26 GMDSS Handbook" Regulation 11 Radio equipment – Sea areas A1, A2, A3 and A4 1 In addition to meeting the requirements of regulation 7, ships engaged on voyages in all sea areas shall be provided with the radio installations and equipment required by regulation 10.2, except that the equipment required by regulation 10.2.3.2 shall not be accepted as an alternative to that required by regulation 10.2.3.1, which shall always be provided. In addition, ships engaged on voyages in all sea areas shall comply with the requirements of regulation 10.3. 2 The Administration may exempt ships constructed before 1 February 1997, and engaged exclusively on voyages within sea areas A2, A3 and A4, from the requirements of regulations 7.1.1.1 and 7.1.2 provided such ships maintain, when practicable, a continuous listening watch on VHF channel 16. This watch shall be kept at the position from which the ship is normally navigated. Regulation 12 Watches 1 Every ship, while at sea, shall maintain a continuous watch: .1 on VHF DSC channel 70, if the ship, in accordance with the requirements of regulation 7.1.2, is fitted with a VHF radio installation; .2 on the distress and safety DSC frequency 2,187.5 kHz, if the ship, in accordance with the require- ments of regulation 9.1.2 or 10.1.3, is fitted with an MF radio installation; .3 on the distress and safety DSC frequencies 2,187.5 kHz and 8,414.5 kHz and also on at least one of the distress and safety DSC frequencies 4,207.5 kHz, 6,312 kHz, 12,577 kHz or 16,804.5 kHz, appro- priate to the time of day and the geographical position of the ship, if the ship, in accordance with the requirements of regulation 10.2.2 or 11.1, is fitted with an MF/HF radio installation. This watch may be kept by means of a scanning receiver; .4 for satellite shore-to-ship distress alerts, if the ship, in accordance with the requirements of regulation 10.1.1, is fitted with an INMARSAT ship earth station. 2 Every ship, while at sea, shall maintain a radio watch for broadcasts of maritime safety information on the appropriate frequency or frequencies on which such information is broadcast for the area in which the ship is navigating. 3 Until 1 February 1999 or until such other date as may be determined by the Maritime Safety Committee, every ship while at sea shall maintain, when practicable, a continuous listening watch on VHF channel 16. This watch shall be kept at the position from which the ship is normally navigated. 4 Until 1 February 1999 or until such other date as may be determined by the Maritime Safety Committee, every ship required to carry a radiotelephone watch receiver shall maintain, while at sea, a continuous watch on the radiotelephone distress frequency 2,182 kHz. This watch shall be kept at the position from which the ship is normally navigated. Regulation 13 Sources of energy 1 There shall be available at all times, while the ship is at sea, a supply of electrical energy sufficient to operate the radio installations and to charge any batteries used as part of a reserve source or sources of energy for the radio installations. 2 A reserve source or sources of energy shall be provided on every ship, to supply radio installations, for the purpose of conducting distress and safety radiocommunications, in the event of failure of the ship’s main and emergency sources of electrical power. The reserve source or sources of energy shall be capable of simultaneously operating the VHF radio installation required by regulation 7.1.1 and, as appropriate for the sea area or sea areas for which the ship is equipped, either the MF radio installation required by regulation 9.1.1, the MF/HF radio installation required by regulation 10.2.1 or 11.1, or the INMARSAT ship earth station required by regulation 10.1.1 and any of the additional loads mentioned in paragraphs 4, 5 and 8 for a period of at least: .1 one hour, on ships constructed on or after 1 February 1995;
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 27" .2 one hour, on ships constructed before 1 February 1995, if the emergency source of electrical power complies fully with all relevant requirements of regulation II-1/42 or 43 including the requirements to supply the radio installations; and .3 six hours, on ships constructed before 1 February 1995, if the emergency source of electrical power is not provided or does not comply fully with all relevant requirements of regulation II-1/42 or 43 including the requirements to supply the radio installations.*The reserve source or sources of energy need not supply independent HF and MF radio installations at the sametime.3 The reserve source or sources of energy shall be independent of the propelling power of the ship and theship’s electrical system.4 Where, in addition to the VHF radio installation, two or more of the other radio installations, referred to inparagraph 2, can be connected to the reserve source or sources of energy, they shall be capable of simultaneouslysupplying, for the period specified, as appropriate, in paragraph 2.1, 2.2 or 2.3, the VHF radio installation and: .1 all other radio installations which can be connected to the reserve source or sources of energy at the same time; or .2 whichever of the other radio installations will consume the most power, if only one of the other radio installations can be connected to the reserve source or sources of energy at the same time as the VHF radio installation.5 The reserve source or sources of energy may be used to supply the electrical lighting required by regulation6.2.4.6 Where a reserve source of energy consists of a rechargeable accumulator battery or batteries: .1 a means of automatically charging such batteries shall be provided which shall be capable of recharging them to minimum capacity requirements within 10 hours; and .2 the capacity of the battery or batteries shall be checked, using an appropriate method,{ at intervals not exceeding 12 months, when the ship is not at sea.7 The siting and installation of accumulator batteries which provide a reserve source of energy shall be such asto ensure: .1 the highest degree of service; .2 a reasonable lifetime; .3 reasonable safety; .4 that battery temperatures remain within the manufacturer’s specifications whether under charge or idle; and .5 that when fully charged, the batteries will provide at least the minimum required hours of operation under all weather conditions.8 If an uninterrupted input of information from the ship’s navigational or other equipment to a radio in-stallation required by this chapter is needed to ensure its proper performance, means shall be provided to ensurethe continuous supply of such information in the event of failure of the ship’s main or emergency source ofelectrical power.* For guidance, the following formula is recommended for determining the electrical load to be supplied by the reserve source of energy for eachradio installation required for distress conditions: 1/2 of the current consumption necessary for transmission + the current consumption necessary forreception + current consumption of any additional loads.{ One method of checking the capacity of an accumulator battery is to fully discharge and recharge the battery, using normal operating current andperiod (e.g. 10 h). Assessment of the charge condition can be made at any time, but it should be done without significant discharge of the batterywhen the ship is at sea.
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 28 GMDSS Handbook" Regulation 14 Performance standards 1 All equipment to which this chapter applies shall be of a type approved by the Administration. Subject to paragraph 2, such equipment shall conform to appropriate performance standards not inferior to those adopted by the Organization.* 2 Equipment installed prior to the dates of application prescribed by regulation 1 may be exempted from full compliance with the appropriate performance standards at the discretion of the Administration, provided that the equipment is compatible with equipment complying with the performance standards, having due regard to the criteria which the Organization may adopt in connection with such standards. Regulation 15 Maintenance requirements 1 Equipment shall be so designed that the main units can be replaced readily, without elaborate recalibration or readjustment. 2 Where applicable, equipment shall be so constructed and installed that it is readily accessible for inspection and on-board maintenance purposes. 3 Adequate information shall be provided to enable the equipment to be properly operated and maintained, taking into account the recommendations of the Organization.{ 4 Adequate tools and spares shall be provided to enable the equipment to be maintained. 5 The Administration shall ensure that radio equipment required by this chapter is maintained to provide the availability of the functional requirements specified in regulation 4 and to meet the recommended performance standards of such equipment. 6 On ships engaged on voyages in sea areas A1 and A2, the availability shall be ensured by using such methods as duplication of equipment, shore-based maintenance or at-sea electronic maintenance capability, or a combi- nation of these, as may be approved by the Administration. 7 On ships engaged on voyages in sea areas A3 and A4, the availability shall be ensured by using a combination of at least two methods such as duplication of equipment, shore-based maintenance or at-sea electronic main- tenance capability, as may be approved by the Administration, taking into account the recommendations of the Organization. * Refer to the following performance standards adopted by the Assembly of the Organization: .1 Narrow-band direct-printing telegraph equipment for the reception of navigational and meteorological warnings and urgent in- formation to ships (resolution A.525(13)) (see annex 3-5-1); .2 General requirements for shipborne radio equipment forming part of the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) and for electronic navigational aids (resolution A.694(17)) (see annex 3-1-1); .3 Ship earth stations capable of two-way communications (resolution A.808(19)) (see annex 3-4-1); .4 VHF radio installations capable of voice communication and digital selective calling (resolution A.803(19)) (see annexes 3-2-1 and 3-2-2); .5 Shipborne MF radio installations capable of voice communication and digital selective calling (resolution A.804(19)) (see annexes 3-2-3 and 3-2-4); .6 Shipborne MF/HF radio installations capable of voice communication, narrow-band direct-printing and digital selective calling (resolution A.806(19)) (see annexes 3-2-5 and 3-2-6); .7 Float-free satellite emergency position-indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs) operating on 406 MHz (resolution A.810(19)) (see annexes 3-3-1 and 3-3-2); .8 Survival craft radar transponders for use in search and rescue operations (resolution A.802(19)) (see annex 3-6-1); .9 Float-free VHF emergency position-indicating radio beacons (resolution A.805(19)) (see annex 3-3-3); .10 INMARSAT Standard-C ship earth stations capable of transmitting and receiving direct-printing communications (resolution A.807(19)) (see annex 3-4-2); .11 Enhanced group call equipment (resolution A.664(16)) (see annex 3-5-2); .12 Float-free satellite emergency position-indicating radio beacons operating through the geostationary INMARSAT satellite system on 1.6 GHz (resolution A.812(19)) (see annex 3-3-4); .13 Float-free release and activation arrangements for emergency radio equipment (resolution A.662(16)) (see annex 3-6-5); .14 System performance standard for the promulgation and co-ordination of maritime safety information using high-frequency narrow- band direct printing (resolution A.699(17)) (see annex 3-5-3); .15 Narrow-band direct-printing telegraph equipment for the reception of navigational and meteorological warnings and urgent in- formation to ships (MSI) by HF (resolution A.700(17)) (see annex 3-5-4). { Refer to the Recommendation on General Requirements for Shipborne Radio Equipment Forming Part of the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) and for Electronic Navigational Aids (Assembly resolution A.694(17)) (see annex 3-1-1).
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 298 While all reasonable steps shall be taken to maintain the equipment in efficient working order to ensurecompliance with all the functional requirements specified in regulation 4, malfunction of the equipment forproviding the general radiocommunications required by regulation 4.8 shall not be considered as making a shipunseaworthy or as a reason for delaying the ship in ports where repair facilities are not readily available, providedthe ship is capable of performing all distress and safety functions.Regulation 16Radio personnelEvery ship shall carry personnel qualified for distress and safety radiocommunication purposes to the satisfactionof the Administration. The personnel shall be holders of certificates specified in the Radio Regulations asappropriate, any one of whom shall be designated to have primary responsibility for radiocommunications duringdistress incidents.Regulation 17Radio recordsA record shall be kept, to the satisfaction of the Administration and as required by the Radio Regulations, of allincidents connected with the radiocommunication service which appear to be of importance to safety of life atsea.3 CHAPTER V Safety of navigationRegulation 12Shipborne navigational equipment(a) For the purpose of this regulation constructed in respect of a ship means a stage of construction where: (i) the keel is laid; or (ii) construction identifiable with a specific ship begins; or (iii) assembly of that ship has commenced comprising at least 50 tonnes or 1% of the estimated mass of all structural material, whichever is less.(b) (i) Ships of 150 tons gross tonnage and upwards shall be fitted with: (1) a standard magnetic compass, except as provided in subparagraph (iv); (2) a steering magnetic compass, unless heading information provided by the standard compass required under (1) is made available and is clearly readable by the helmsman at the main steering position; (3) adequate means of communication between the standard compass position and the normal navigation control position to the satisfaction of the Administration; and (4) means for taking bearings as nearly as practicable over an arc of the horizon of 3608. (ii) Each magnetic compass referred to in subparagraph (i) shall be properly adjusted and its table or curve of residual deviations shall be available at all times. (iii) A spare magnetic compass, interchangeable with the standard compass, shall be carried, unless the steering compass mentioned in subparagraph (i)(2) or a gyro-compass is fitted. (iv) The Administration, if it considers it unreasonable or unnecessary to require a standard magnetic compass, may exempt individual ships or classes of ships from these requirements if the nature of the voyage, the ship’s proximity to land or the type of ship does not warrant a standard compass, provided that a suitable steering compass is in all cases carried.
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 30 GMDSS Handbook(c) Ships of less than 150 tons gross tonnage shall, as far as the Administration considers it reasonable andpracticable, be fitted with a steering compass and have means for taking bearings.(d) Ships of 500 tons gross tonnage and upwards constructed on or after 1 September 1984 shall be fitted with agyro-compass complying with the following requirements: (i) the master gyro-compass or a gyro repeater shall be clearly readable by the helmsman at the main steering position; (ii) on ships of 1,600 tons gross tonnage and upwards a gyro repeater or gyro repeaters shall be provided and shall be suitably placed for taking bearings as nearly as practicable over an arc of the horizon of 3608.(e) Ships of 1,600 tons gross tonnage and upwards, constructed before 1 September 1984 when engaged oninternational voyages, shall be fitted with a gyro-compass complying with the requirements of paragraph (d)."(f) Ships with emergency steering positions shall at least be provided with a telephone or other means ofcommunication for relaying heading information to such positions. In addition, ships of 500 tons gross tonnageand upwards constructed on or after 1 February 1992 shall be provided with arrangements for supplying visualcompass readings to the emergency steering position."(g) Ships of 500 tons gross tonnage and upwards constructed on or after 1 September 1984 and ships of 1,600tons gross tonnage and upwards constructed before 1 September 1984 shall be fitted with a radar installation.From 1 February 1995, the radar installation shall be capable of operating in the 9 GHz frequency band. Inaddition, after 1 February 1995, passenger ships irrespective of size and cargo ships of 300 tons gross tonnage andupwards when engaged on international voyages shall be fitted with a radar installation capable of operating in the9 GHz frequency band. Passenger ships of less than 500 tons gross tonnage and cargo ships of 300 tons grosstonnage and upwards but less than 500 tons gross tonnage may be exempted from compliance with the re-quirements of paragraph (r) at the discretion of the Administration, provided that the equipment is fully com-patible with the radar transponder for search and rescue."(h) Ships of 10,000 tons gross tonnage and upwards shall be fitted with two radar installations, each capable ofbeing operated independently* of the other. From 1 February 1995, at least one of the radar installations shall becapable of operating in the 9 GHz frequency band.3(i) Facilities for plotting radar readings shall be provided on the navigating bridge of ships required by paragraph(g) or (h) to be fitted with a radar installation. In ships of 1,600 tons gross tonnage and upwards constructed on orafter 1 September 1984 the plotting facilities shall be at least as effective as a reflection plotter.(j) (i) An automatic radar plotting aid shall be fitted on: (1) ships of 10,000 tons gross tonnage and upwards, constructed on or after 1 September 1984; (2) tankers constructed before 1 September 1984 as follows: (aa) if of 40,000 tons gross tonnage and upwards by 1 January 1985; (bb) if of 10,000 tons gross tonnage and upwards but less than 40,000 tons gross tonnage, by 1 January 1986; (3) ships constructed before 1 September 1984, that are not tankers, as follows: (aa) if of 40,000 tons gross tonnage and upwards by 1 September 1986; (bb) if of 20,000 tons gross tonnage and upwards, but less than 40,000 tons gross tonnage, by 1 September 1987; (cc) if of 15,000 tons gross tonnage and upwards, but less than 20,000 tons gross tonnage, by 1 September 1988. (ii) Automatic radar plotting aids fitted prior to 1 September 1984 which do not fully conform to the performance standards adopted by the Organization{ may, at the discretion of the Administration, be retained until 1 January 1991.* Refer to section 4 of the Recommendation on Performance Standards for Radar Equipment, adopted by the Organization by resolutionA.477(XII).{ Refer to the Performance Standards for Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA), adopted by the Organization by resolution A.823(19).
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 31 (iii) The Administration may exempt ships from the requirements of this paragraph, in cases where it considers it unreasonable or unnecessary for such equipment to be carried, or when the ships will be taken permanently out of service within two years of the appropriate implementation date.(k) When engaged on international voyages ships of 1,600 tons gross tonnage and upwards constructed before25 May 1980 and ships of 500 tons gross tonnage and upwards constructed on or after 25 May 1980 shall be fittedwith an echo-sounding device.(l) When engaged on international voyages ships of 500 tons gross tonnage and upwards constructed on or after1 September 1984 shall be fitted with a device to indicate speed and distance. Ships required by paragraph (j) to befitted with an automatic radar plotting aid shall be fitted with a device to indicate speed and distance through thewater.(m) Ships of 1,600 tons gross tonnage and upwards constructed before 1 September 1984 and all ships of 500tons gross tonnage and upwards constructed on or after 1 September 1984 shall be fitted with indicators showingthe rudder angle, the rate of revolution of each propeller and in addition, if fitted with variable pitch propellers orlateral thrust propellers, the pitch and operational mode of such propellers. All these indicators shall be readablefrom the conning position.(n) Ships of 100,000 tons gross tonnage and upwards constructed on or after 1 September 1984 shall be fittedwith a rate-of-turn indicator.(o) Except as provided in regulations I/7(b)(ii), I/8 and I/9, while all reasonable steps shall be taken to maintainthe apparatus referred to in paragraphs (d) to (n) in efficient working order, malfunctions of the equipment shallnot be considered as making a ship unseaworthy or as a reason for delaying the ship in ports where repair facilitiesare not readily available."(p) When engaged on international voyages, ships of 1,600 tons gross tonnage and upwards shall be fitted witha radio direction-finding apparatus. The Administration may exempt a ship from this requirement if it considers itunreasonable or unnecessary for such apparatus to be carried or if the ship is provided with other radionavigationequipment suitable for use throughout its intended voyages."(q) Until 1 February 1999, ships of 1,600 tons gross tonnage and upwards constructed on or after 25 May1980 and before 1 February 1995, when engaged on international voyages, shall be fitted with radio equipmentfor homing on the radiotelephone distress frequency.3(r) All equipment fitted in compliance with this regulation shall be of a type approved by the Administration.Equipment installed on board ships on or after 1 September 1984 shall conform to appropriate performancestandards not inferior to those adopted by the Organization.* Equipment fitted prior to the adoption of relatedperformance standards may be exempted from full compliance with those standards at the discretion of theAdministration, having due regard to the recommended criteria which the Organization might adopt in con-nection with the standards concerned.(s) A rigidly connected composite unit of a pushing vessel and associated pushed vessel, when designed as adedicated and integrated tug and barge combination, shall be regarded as a single ship for the purpose of thisregulation.(t) If the application of the requirements of this regulation necessitates structural alterations to a ship con-structed before 1 September 1984, the Administration may allow extension of the time limit for fitting therequired equipment not later than 1 September 1989, taking into account the first scheduled dry-docking of sucha ship required by the present regulations.* Refer to the following recommendations adopted by the Organization by the resolutions indicated: Recommendation on General Requirements for Shipborne Radio Equipment forming Part of the GMDSS and for Electronic Navigational Aids (resolution A.694(17)) (see annex 3-1-1); Recommendation on Performance Standards for Magnetic Compasses (resolution A.382(X)); Recommendation on Performance Standards for Gyro-Compasses (resolution A.424(XI)); Recommendation on Performance Standards for Radar Equipment (resolutions A.477(XII) and A.278(VIII)); Performance Standards for Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA) (resolution A.422(XI)); Recommendation on Performance Standards for Echo-Sounding Equipment (resolution A.224(VII)); Recommendation on Performance Standards for Devices to Indicate Speed and Distance (resolution A.478(XII)); Performance Standards for Rate-of-Turn Indicators (resolution A.526(13)); Recommendation on Unification of Performance Standards for Navigational Equipment (resolution A.575(14)); Performance Standards for Radio Direction-Finding Systems (resolution A.665(16)) (see annex 3-6-6); Recommendation on Performance Standards for Shipborne Receivers for Use with Differential OMEGA (resolution A.479(XII)); Recommendation on methods of measuring noise levels at listening posts (resolution A.343(IX));Regarding unification of ARPA signals, see MSC/Circ. 563 and IEC Publication 872.
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 32 GMDSS Handbook(u) Except as provided elsewhere in this regulation, the Administration may grant to individual ships ex-emptions of a partial or conditional nature, when any such ship is engaged on a voyage where the maximumdistance of the ship from the shore, the length and nature of the voyage, the absence of general navigation hazards,and other conditions affecting safety are such as to render the full application of this regulation unreasonable orunnecessary. When deciding whether or not to grant exemptions to an individual ship, the Administration shallhave regard to the effect that an exemption may have upon the safety of all other ships.Regulation 14Aids to navigation"The Contracting Governments undertake to arrange for the establishment and maintenance of such aids tonavigation as, in their opinion, the volume of traffic justifies and the degree of risk requires, and to arrange forinformation relating to these aids to be made available to all concerned.3Regulation 21International Code of Signals"All ships which, in accordance with the present Convention, are required to carry radio installations shall carrythe International Code of Signals. This publication shall also be carried by any other ship which, in the opinion ofthe Administration, has a need to use it.3
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 33" APPENDIX Form of Safety Certificate for Passenger Ships PASSENGER SHIP SAFETY CERTIFICATE This Certificate shall be supplemented by a Record of Equipment (Form P)(Official seal) (State) an 1 for international voyage a short Issued under the provisions of the INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION FOR THE SAFETY OF LIFE AT SEA, 1974, as amended under the authority of the Government of (name of the State)by (person or organization authorized)Particulars of ship2Name of ship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Distinctive number or letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Port of registry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gross tonnage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sea areas in which ship is certified to operate (regulation IV/2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IMO Number3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Date on which keel was laid or ship was at a similarstage of construction or, where applicable, date onwhich work for a conversion or an alteration ormodification of a major character was commenced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ._1 Delete as appropriate.2 Alternatively, the particulars of the ship may be placed horizontally in boxes.3 In accordance with the IMO Ship Identification Number Scheme, adopted by the Organization by resolution A.600(15)
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 34 GMDSS Handbook"THIS IS TO CERTIFY:1 That the ship has been surveyed in accordance with the requirements of regulation I/7 of the Convention.2 That the survey showed that:2.1 the ship complied with the requirements of the Convention as regards: .1 the structure, main and auxiliary machinery, boilers and other pressure vessels; .2 the watertight subdivision arrangements and details; .3 the following subdivision load lines: Subdivision load lines assigned and Freeboard To apply when the spaces in which marked on the ship’s side at amidships passengers are carried include the (regulation II-1/13) following alternative spaces C.1 .......... ................................... C.2 .......... ................................... C.3 .......... ...................................2.2 the ship complied with the requirements of the Convention as regards structural fire protection, fire safety systems and appliances and fire control plans;2.3 the life-saving appliances and the equipment of the lifeboats, liferafts and rescue boats were provided in accordance with the requirements of the Convention;2.4 the ship was provided with a line-throwing appliance and radio installations used in life-saving appliances in accordance with the requirements of the Convention;2.5 the ship complied with the requirements of the Convention as regards radio installations;2.6 the functioning of the radio installations used in life-saving appliances complied with the requirements of the Convention;2.7 the ship complied with the requirements of the Convention as regards shipborne navigational equipment, means of embarkation for pilots and nautical publications;2.8 the ship was provided with lights, shapes, means of making sound signals and distress signals, in ac- cordance with the requirements of the Convention and the International Regulations for Preventing Colli- sions at Sea in force;2.9 in all other respects the ship complied with the relevant requirements of the Convention.3 That an Exemption Certificate has/has not4 been issued. This certificate is valid until . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Issued at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Place of issue of certificate) .......................... ..................................................... (Date of issue) (Signature of authorized official issuing the certificate) (Seal or stamp of the issuing authority, as appropriate)_4 Delete as appropriate.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 35" Form of Safety Construction Certificate for Cargo Ships CARGO SHIP SAFETY CONSTRUCTION CERTIFICATE(Official seal) (State) Issued under the provisions of the INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION FOR THE SAFETY OF LIFE AT SEA, 1974, as amended under the authority of the Government of (name of the State)by (person or organization authorized)Particulars of ship1Name of ship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Distinctive number or letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Port of registry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gross tonnage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Deadweight of ship (metric tons)2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IMO Number3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Type of ship4 Oil tanker Chemical tanker Gas carrier Cargo ship other than any of the aboveDate on which keel was laid or ship was at a similarstage of construction or, where applicable, date onwhich work for a conversion or an alteration ormodification of a major character was commenced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ._1 Alternatively, the particulars of the ship may be placed horizontally in boxes.2 For oil tankers, chemical tankers and gas carriers only.3 In accordance with the IMO Ship Identification Number Scheme, adopted by the Organization by resolution A.600(15).4 Delete as appropriate.
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 36 GMDSS Handbook"THIS IS TO CERTIFY:1 That the ship has been surveyed in accordance with the requirements of regulation I/10 of the Convention.2 That the survey showed that the condition of the structure, machinery and equipment as defined in the above regulation was satisfactory and the ship complied with the relevant requirements of chapters II-1 and II-2 of the Convention (other than those relating to fire safety systems and appliances and fire control plans).3 That an Exemption Certificate has/has not5 been issued. This certificate is valid until . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Issued at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Place of issue of certificate) .......................... ............................................... (Date of issue) (Signature of authorized official issuing the certificate) (Seal or stamp of the issuing authority, as appropriate)_5 Delete as appropriate.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 37" Form of Safety Equipment Certificate for Cargo Ships CARGO SHIP SAFETY EQUIPMENT CERTIFICATE This Certificate shall be supplemented by a Record of Equipment (Form E)(Official seal) (State) Issued under the provisions of the INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION FOR THE SAFETY OF LIFE AT SEA, 1974, as amended under the authority of the Government of (name of the State)by (person or organization authorized)Particulars of ship1Name of ship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Distinctive number or letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Port of registry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gross tonnage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Deadweight of ship (metric tons)2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Length of ship (regulation III/3.10). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IMO Number3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Type of ship4 Oil tanker Chemical tanker Gas carrier Cargo ship other than any of the aboveDate on which keel was laid or ship was at a similarstage of construction or, where applicable, date onwhich work for a conversion or an alteration ormodification of a major character was commenced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ._1 Alternatively, the particulars of the ship may be placed in boxes.2 For oil tankers, chemical tankers and gas carriers only.3 In accordance with the IMO Ship Identification Number Scheme, adopted by the Organization by resolution A.600(15).4 Delete as appropriate.
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 38 GMDSS Handbook"THIS IS TO CERTIFY:1 That the ship has been surveyed in accordance with the requirements of regulation I/8 of the Convention.2 That the survey showed that:2.1 the ship complied with the requirements of the Convention as regards fire safety systems and appliances and fire control plans;2.2 the life-saving appliances and the equipment of the lifeboats, liferafts and rescue boats were provided in accordance with the requirements of the Convention;2.3 the ship was provided with a line-throwing appliance and radio installations used in life-saving appliances in accordance with the requirements of the Convention;2.4 the ship complied with the requirements of the Convention as regards shipborne navigational equipment, means of embarkation for pilots and nautical publications;2.5 the ship was provided with lights, shapes, means of making sound signals and distress signals, in ac- cordance with the requirements of the Convention and the International Regulations for Preventing Colli- sions at Sea in force;2.6 in all other respects the ship complied with the relevant requirements of the Convention.3 That the ship operates in accordance with regulation III/26.1.1.1 within the limits of the trade area . . . . .4 That an Exemption Certificate has/has not5 been issued. This certificate is valid until . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Issued at. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Place of issue of certificate)............................... .............................................. (Date of issue) (Signature of authorized official issuing the certificate) (Seal or stamp of the issuing authority, as appropriate)_5 Delete as appropriate.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 39" Form of Safety Radio Certificate for Cargo Ships CARGO SHIP SAFETY RADIO CERTIFICATE This Certificate shall be supplemented by a Record of Equipment of Radio Facilities (Form R)(Official seal) (State) Issued under the provisions of the INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION FOR THE SAFETY OF LIFE AT SEA, 1974, as amended under the authority of the Government of (name of the State)by (person or organization authorized)Particulars of ship1Name of ship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Distinctive number or letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Port of registry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gross tonnage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sea areas in which ship is certified to operate (regulation IV/2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IMO Number2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Date on which keel was laid or ship was at a similarstage of construction or, where applicable, date onwhich work for a conversion or an alteration ormodification of a major character was commenced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THIS IS TO CERTIFY:1 That the ship has been surveyed in accordance with the requirements of regulation I/9 of the Convention.2 That the survey showed that:2.1 the ship complied with the requirements of the Convention as regards radio installations;2.2 the functioning of the radio installations used in life-saving appliances complied with the requirements of the Convention._1 Alternatively, the particulars of the ship may be placed horizontally in boxes.2 In accordance with the IMO Ship Identification Number Scheme, adopted by the Organization by resolution A.600(15)
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 40 GMDSS Handbook"3 That an Exemption Certificate has/has not3 been issued. This certificate is valid until . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Issued at. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Place of issue of certificate)............................... .............................................. (Date of issue) (Signature of authorized official issuing the certificate) (Seal or stamp of the issuing authority, as appropriate)_3 Delete as appropriate.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-1 – Page 41" Form of Exemption Certificate EXEMPTION CERTIFICATE(Official seal) (State) Issued under the provisions of the INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION FOR THE SAFETY OF LIFE AT SEA, 1974, as amended under the authority of the Government of (name of the State)by (person or organization authorized)Particulars of ship1Name of ship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Distinctive number or letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Port of registry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gross tonnage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IMO Number2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THIS IS TO CERTIFY:That the ship is, under the authority conferred by regulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of the Convention, exempted from the requirements of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . of the Convention.Conditions, if any, on which the Exemption Certificate is granted:......... ..... ................... .......... ................................................... ..... ................... .......... ................................................... ..... ................... .......... ..........................................Voyages, if any, for which the Exemption Certificate is granted:............... ..... ... ............................................................................. ..... ... ............................................................................. ..... ... .............................................................._1 Alternatively, the particulars of the ship may be placed horizontally in boxes.2 In accordance with the IMO Ship Identification Number Scheme, adopted by the Organization by resolution A.600(15).
  • Annex 1-1 – Page 42 GMDSS Handbook"This certificate is valid until . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . subject to the. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Certificate, to which this certificate is attached,remaining valid.Issued at. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Place of issue of certificate)............................... ............................................... (Date of issue) (Signature of authorized official issuing the certificate) (Seal or stamp of the issuing authority, as appropriate)
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-2 – Page 1 Annex 1-2 Resolution 2 of the 1988 GMDSS Conference: Records of Equipment to supplement the SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Certificate, Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate and Cargo Ship Safety Radio CertificateTHE CONFERENCE,HAVING ADOPTED amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (SOLASConvention) (hereinafter referred to as ‘‘the Convention’’) concerning radiocommunications for the globalmaritime distress and safety system (GMDSS), including revised forms of the Passenger Ship Safety Certificate,Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate and Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate,NOTING regulation I/12(a)(v) of the Convention, as amended, which prescribes that the said safety certificatesshall be supplemented by Records of Equipment adopted by this Conference,HAVING CONSIDERED the proposed forms of the Records of Equipment prepared by the Maritime SafetyCommittee at its fifty-fifth session,1. ADOPTS the forms of the Records of Equipment to supplement the SOLAS Passenger Ship Safety Cer-tificate, Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate and Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate, set out in the annex tothis resolution;2. DECIDES that the Records of Equipment annexed to this resolution shall be subject to amendment inaccordance with the procedures prescribed in article VIII of the Convention, applicable to amendments to theannex of the Convention other than chapter I.
  • Annex 1-2 – Page 2 GMDSS Handbook Annex to resolution 2 Records of equipment Record of Equipment for the Passenger Ship Safety Certificate (Form P) This Record shall be permanently attached to the Passenger Ship Safety Certificate RECORD OF EQUIPMENT FOR COMPLIANCE WITH THE INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION FOR THE SAFETY OF LIFE AT SEA, 1974, AS AMENDED IN 19881 Particulars of ship Name of ship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Distinctive number or letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Number of passengers for which certified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minimum number of persons with required qualifications to operate the radio installations . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Details of life-saving appliances 1 Total number of persons for which life-saving appliances are provided .................... Port side Starboard side 2 Total number of lifeboats ........... ........... 2.1 Total number of persons accommodated by them ........... ........... 2.2 Number of partially enclosed lifeboats (regulation III/42) ........... ........... 2.3 Number of self-righting partially enclosed lifeboats (regulation III/43) ........... ........... 2.4 Number of totally enclosed lifeboats (regulation III/44) ........... ........... 2.5 Other lifeboats 2.5.1 Number ........... ........... 2.5.2 Type ........... ........... 3 Number of motor lifeboats (included in the total lifeboats shown above) ............. 3.1 Number of lifeboats fitted with searchlights ............. 4 Number of rescue boats ............. 4.1 Number of boats which are included in the total lifeboats shown above ............. 5 Liferafts 5.1 Those for which approved launching appliances are required: ............. 5.1.1 Number of liferafts ............. 5.1.2 Number of persons accommodated by them .............
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-2 – Page 3 5.2 Those for which approved launching appliances are not required: 5.2.1 Number of liferafts ............. 5.2.2 Number of persons accommodated by them ............. 6 Buoyant apparatus 6.1 Number of apparatus ............. 6.2 Number of persons capable of being supported ............. 7 Number of lifebuoys ............. 8 Number of lifejackets ............. 9 Immersion suits 9.1 Total number ............. 9.2 Number of suits complying with the requirements for lifejackets ............. 1 10 Number of thermal protective aids ............. 11 Radio installations used in life-saving appliances 11.1 Number of radar transponders ............. 11.2 Number of two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus .............3 Details of radio facilities Item Actual provision 1 Primary systems 1.1 VHF radio installation: 1.1.1 DSC encoder ................. 1.1.2 DSC watch receiver ................. 1.1.3 Radiotelephony ................. 1.2 MF radio installation: 1.2.1 DSC encoder ................. 1.2.2 DSC watch receiver ................. 1.2.3 Radiotelephony ................. 1.3 MF/HF radio installation: 1.3.1 DSC encoder ................. 1.3.2 DSC watch receiver ................. 1.3.3 Radiotelephony ................. 1.3.4 Direct-printing radiotelegraphy ................. 1.4 INMARSAT ship earth station ................. 2 Secondary means of alerting ................. 3 Facilities for reception of maritime safety information 3.1 NAVTEX receiver ................. 3.2 EGC receiver ................. 3.3 HF direct-printing radiotelegraph receiver ................. 4 Satellite EPIRB 4.1 COSPAS–SARSAT ................. 4.2 INMARSAT ................. 5 VHF EPIRB ................. 6 Ship’s radar transponder ................. 7 Radiotelephone distress frequency watch receiver on 2,182 kHz2 ................. 8 Device for generating the radiotelephone alarm signal on 2,182 kHz3 ................._1 Excluding those required by regulations III/38.5.1.24, III/41.8.31 and III/47.2.2.13.2 Unless another date is determined by the Maritime Safety Committee, this item need not be reproduced on the record attached to certificatesissued after 1 February 1999.3 This item need not be reproduced on the record attached to certificates issued after 1 February 1999.
  • Annex 1-2 – Page 4 GMDSS Handbook4 Methods used to ensure availability of radio facilities (regulations IV/15.6 and 15.7) 4.1 Duplication of equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2 Shore-based maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3 At-sea maintenance capability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Ships constructed before 1 February 1995 which do not comply with all the applicable requirements of chapter IV of the Convention as amended in 19884 Requirements of Actual provision regulations Hours of listening by operator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Number of operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whether auto alarm fitted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whether main installation fitted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whether reserve installation fitted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whether main and reserve transmitters electrically separated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . or combined6 Ships constructed before 1 February 1992 which do not fully comply with the applicable requirements of chapter III of the Convention as amended in 19885 Actual provision Radiotelegraph installation for lifeboat ................. Portable radio apparatus for survival craft ................. Survival craft EPIRB (121.5 MHz and 243.0 MHz) ................. Two-way radiotelephone apparatus .................THIS IS TO CERTIFY that this Record is correct in all respectsIssued at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Place of issue of the Record)............................... ............................................... (Date of issue) (Signature of duly authorized official issuing the Record) (Seal or stamp of the issuing authority, as appropriate)_4 This section need not be reproduced on the record attached to certificates issued after 1 February 1999.5 This section need not be reproduced on the record attached to certificates issued after 1 February 1995.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-2 – Page 5 Record of Equipment for the Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate (Form E) This Record shall be permanently attached to the Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate RECORD OF EQUIPMENT FOR COMPLIANCE WITH THE INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION FOR THE SAFETY OF LIFE AT SEA, 1974, AS AMENDED IN 19881 Particulars of ship Name of ship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Distinctive number or letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Details of life-saving appliances 1 Total number of persons for which life-saving appliances are provided ..................... Port side Starboard side 2 Total number of lifeboats ........... ........... 2.1 Total number of persons accommodated by them ........... ........... 2.2 Number of self-righting partially enclosed lifeboats (regulation III/43) ........... ........... 2.3 Number of totally enclosed lifeboats (regulation III/44) ........... ........... 2.4 Number of lifeboats with a self-contained air support system (regulation III/45) ........... ........... 2.5 Number of fire-protected lifeboats (regulation III/46) ........... ........... 2.6 Other lifeboats 2.6.1 Number ........... ........... 2.6.2 Type ........... ........... 2.7 Number of free-fall lifeboats 2.7.1 Totally enclosed (regulation III/44) ...................... 2.7.2 Self-contained (regulation III/45) ...................... 2.7.3 Fire-protected (regulation III/46) ...................... 3 Number of motor lifeboats (included in the total lifeboats shown above) ............. 3.1 Number of lifeboats fitted with searchlights ............. 4 Number of rescue boats ............. 4.1 Number of boats which are included in the total lifeboats shown above ............. 5 Liferafts 5.1 Those for which approved launching appliances are required: 5.1.1 Number of liferafts ............. 5.1.2 Number of persons accommodated by them ............. 5.2 Those for which approved launching appliances are not required: 5.2.1 Number of liferafts ............. 5.2.2 Number of persons accommodated by them .............
  • Annex 1-2 – Page 6 GMDSS Handbook 5.3 Number of liferafts required by regulation III/26.1.4 ............. 6 Number of lifebuoys ............. 7 Number of lifejackets ............. 8 Immersion suits 8.1 Total number ............. 8.2 Number of suits complying with the requirements for lifejackets ............. 1 9 Number of thermal protective aids ............. 10 Radio installations used in life-saving appliances 10.1 Number of radar transponders ............. 10.2 Number of two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus .............3 Ships constructed before 1 February 1992 which do not fully comply with the applicable requirements of chapter III of the Convention as amended in 19882 Actual provision Radiotelegraph installation for lifeboat ................. Portable radio apparatus for survival craft ................. Survival craft EPIRB (121.5 MHz and 243.0 MHz) ................. Two-way radiotelephone apparatus .................THIS IS TO CERTIFY that this Record is correct in all respectsIssued at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Place of issue of the Record)............................... ............................................... (Date of issue) (Signature of duly authorized official issuing the Record) (Seal or stamp of the issuing authority, as appropriate)_1 Excluding those required by regulations III/38.5.1.24, III/41.8.31 and III/47.2.2.13.2 This section need not be reproduced on the record attached to certificates issued after 1 February 1995.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-2 – Page 7 Record of Equipment for the Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate (Form R) This Record shall be permanently attached to the Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate RECORD OF EQUIPMENT OF RADIO FACILITIES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH THE INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION FOR THE SAFETY OF LIFE AT SEA, 1974, AS AMENDED IN 19881 Particulars of ship Name of ship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Distinctive number or letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minimum number of persons with required qualifications to operate the radio installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Details of radio facilities Item Actual provision 1 Primary systems 1.1 VHF radio installation: 1.1.1 DSC encoder ................. 1.1.2 DSC watch receiver ................. 1.1.3 Radiotelephony ................. 1.2 MF radio installation: 1.2.1 DSC encoder ................. 1.2.2 DSC watch receiver ................. 1.2.3 Radiotelephony ................. 1.3 MF/HF radio installation: 1.3.1 DSC encoder ................. 1.3.2 DSC watch receiver ................. 1.3.3 Radiotelephony ................. 1.3.4 Direct-printing telegraphy ................. 1.4 INMARSAT ship earth station ................. 2 Secondary means of alerting ................. 3 Facilities for reception of maritime safety information 3.1 NAVTEX receiver ................. 3.2 EGC receiver ................. 3.3 HF direct-printing radiotelegraph receiver ................. 4 Satellite EPIRB 4.1 COSPAS–SARSAT ................. 4.2 INMARSAT ................. 5 VHF EPIRB ................. 6 Ship’s radar transponder ................. 1 7 Radiotelephone distress frequency watch receiver on 2,182 kHz ................. 2 8 Device for generating the radiotelephone alarm signal on 2,182 kHz ................._1 Unless another date is determined by the Maritime Safety Committee, this item need not be reproduced on the record attached to certificatesissued after 1 February 1999.2 This item need not be reproduced on the record attached to certificates after 1 February 1999.
  • Annex 1-2 – Page 8 GMDSS Handbook3 Methods used to ensure availability of radio facilities (regulations IV/15.6 and 15.7) 3.1 Duplication of equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2 Shore-based maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3 At-sea maintenance capability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Ships constructed before 1 February 1995 which do not comply with all the applicable requirements of chapter IV of the Convention as amended in 19883 4.1 For ships required to be fitted with radiotelegraphy in accordance with the Convention in force prior to 1 February 1992. Requirements of Actual provision regulations Hours of listening by operator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Number of operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whether auto alarm fitted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whether main installation fitted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whether reserve installation fitted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whether main and reserve transmitters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . electrically separated or combined 4.2 For ships required to be fitted with radiotelephony in accordance with the Convention in force prior to 1 February 1992. Requirements of Actual provision regulations Hours of listening ............ .............. Number of operators ............ ..............THIS IS TO CERTIFY that this Record is correct in all respectsIssued at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Place of issue of the Record)............................... ................................................ (Date of issue) (Signature of duly authorized official issuing the Record) (Seal or stamp of the issuing authority, as appropriate)_3 This section need not be reproduced on the record attached to certificates issued after 1 February 1999.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-3 – Page 1 Annex 1-3 Resolution 3 of the 1988 GMDSS Conference: Recommendation on the early introduction of global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) elementsTHE CONFERENCE,HAVING ADOPTED the amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (SOLASConvention) concerning radiocommunications for the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS),NOTING resolution A.617(15)* – Implementation of the NAVTEX system as a component of the world-widenavigational warning service, which, inter alia, invites Member Governments to commence NAVTEX broadcastsas soon as practicable,NOTING ALSO that the use of ship earth stations (SES) is provided for in the Guidelines on equivalents forequipment to introduce elements of the future GMDSS (MSC/Circ. 417),NOTING FURTHER that the draft Assembly resolution on the carriage of satellite emergency position-indicatingradio beacons (EPIRBs), approved by the Maritime Safety Committee at its fifty-fifth session, recommends thatAdministrations encourage the early fitting of float-free satellite EPIRBs prior to the date of entry into force of therequirements of chapter IV of the 1988 SOLAS Amendments for the carriage of satellite EPIRBs on ships,NOTING IN PARTICULAR that the ITU World Administrative Radio Conference for the Mobile Services, 1987adopted new provisions of the Radio Regulations and adopted Resolution No. 331{ – Relating to the Intro-duction of Provisions for the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) and Continuation of theexisting Distress and Safety Provisions and revised Resolution No. 322 – Relating to Coast Stations and CoastEarth Stations Assuming Watchkeeping Responsibilities on Certain Frequencies in Connection with the Im-plementation of Distress and Safety Communications for the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System(GMDSS),BEARING IN MIND that digital selective calling (DSC) for all ships and HF direct-printing telegraphy (NBDP)carriage requirements for ships of 300 tons gross tonnage and over but less than 1,600 tons gross tonnage aresubject to review in accordance with resolution A.606(15){concerning review and evaluation of the GMDSS,BEING OF THE OPINION that such elements of the GMDSS as the NAVTEX system, SES, satellite EPIRBs,DSC and HF NBDP are of major benefit to the safety of life at sea,1. RECOMMENDS that the NAVTEX, satellite EPIRB and SES elements of the GMDSS be introduced asearly as possible;2. INVITES the Maritime Safety Committee to keep these matters under review and take appropriate steps topromote their early introduction;3. URGES the Maritime Safety Committee to complete the review of DSC for all ships and HF NBDP inaccordance with resolution A.606(15) by 1 February 1992, including the possible use of HF NBDP as analternative to HF DSC.* See annex 2-6.{ See annex 10-12.{ See annex 2-3.
  • Annex 1-4 – Page 1 GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-4 Resolution 4 of the 1988 GMDSS Conference: Recommendation on the early introduction of GMDSS radio life-saving appliancesTHE CONFERENCE,HAVING ADOPTED the amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (SOLASConvention) concerning radiocommunications for the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS),NOTING that the amendments will enter into force on 1 February 1992 and that these amendments include newequipment requirements for radio life-saving appliances,NOTING FURTHER that the radio life-saving appliances fitted before 1 February 1992 in accordance with the1983 Amendments to the SOLAS Convention will have to be replaced by 1 February 1995 with regard tosurvival craft EPIRBs and portable two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus,RECOGNIZING the need for ships’ equipment to have as long an amortization period as possible,RECOGNIZING FURTHER that the early carriage of GMDSS radio life-saving appliances will improve safety atsea,BEARING IN MIND that the carriage of new equipment required for survival craft in the GMDSS does notinclude any capability of alerting prior to the introduction of satellite EPIRBs,1 RECOMMENDS Administrations to encourage: (a) the early implementation of the GMDSS provisions with respect to radio life-saving appliances instead of the provisions in the 1983 Amendments to the 1974 SOLAS Convention; (b) ships to carry a satellite EPIRB or ensure that they comply with the requirements of, as appropriate, regulations III/6.2.1 or 6.2.2 or both of the 1983 SOLAS Amendments;2 FURTHER RECOMMENDS that, where a means of transmitting signals for locating is provided on board aship, Administrations accept a satellite EPIRB as equivalent to the survival craft EPIRBs required by regulationIII/6.2.3 of the 1983 Amendments to the 1974 SOLAS Convention.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-5 – Page 1 Annex 1-5 Resolution 5 of the 1988 GMDSS Conference: Reviews of the requirements of SOLAS regulation IV/15.7THE CONFERENCE,HAVING ADOPTED the amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (SOLASConvention) concerning radiocommunications for the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS),RECOGNIZING that the operation of the GMDSS is dependent upon implementation of the GMDSS byContracting Governments in an effective manner,RECOGNIZING FURTHER that Contracting Governments will be required to continually assess the require-ments and means of attaining the goals and objectives of the GMDSS,NOTING regulation IV/15.7 which refers to recommendations concerning the methods of equipment main-tenance which are to be developed by the Organization,1. REQUESTS the Maritime Safety Committee to periodically review the requirements of regulation IV/15.7in the light of experience gained;2. FURTHER requests the Secretary-General to circulate the results of these periodic reviews to MemberGovernments for their consideration.
  • Annex 1-6 – Page 1 GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-6 Resolution 6 of the 1988 GMDSS Conference: Recommendation on application of administrative, financial and operational arrangements for the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS)THE CONFERENCE,HAVING ADOPTED the amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (SOLASConvention) concerning radiocommunications for the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS),NOTING Assembly resolution A.607(15) on the administrative, financial and operational arrangements related tothe GMDSS which requests the Maritime Safety Committee to resolve issues of substance prior to this Con-ference,NOTING ALSO Assembly resolution A.523(13)1 on charges for distress, urgency and safety messages through theINMARSAT system,NOTING FURTHER that the Council of the International Maritime Satellite Organization (INMARSAT)decided at its tenth session that no space segment charges shall be levied for distress messages as they are defined inthe Radio Regulations and that a number of coast earth stations already accept free of charge certain types of safetyrelated traffic such as medical advice, meteorological reports, navigation danger reports,BEARING IN MIND that the INMARSAT Council has not yet taken any decision on the costs for implementingall the types of satellite communications related to distress and safety communications of the GMDSS including,inter alia, distress alerts in some circumstances, search and rescue co-ordinating transmissions, meteorologicalreports and ship reporting systems, as described in the Charging Principles developed by the Second Meeting ofExperts on the Funding of International Distress and Safety Satellite Communications,BEING OF THE OPINION that the funding arrangements for all distress and safety satellite communications mustbe finalized as soon as possible,1. INVITES the INMARSAT Council to agree to the charging principles recommended by the SecondMeeting of Experts, as well as operational arrangements that may facilitate the use by Administrations of thoseINMARSAT facilities that will be important elements of the GMDSS;2. REQUESTS the Secretary-General to bring this resolution to the attention of: (a) INMARSAT and invite its Director General to communicate the INMARSAT Council’s decision on this matter to the Organization; (b) the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and invite its Secretary-General to request the appropriate bodies of the Union to consider, as a matter of urgency, tariff and charging principles to be applied for use of the public telecommunication networks in relation to the GMDSS;3. REQUESTS the Maritime Safety Committee to review the funding arrangements prior to the im-plementation date of the GMDSS.1 This has been superseded by resolution A.707(17) (see annex 2-14).
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-7 – Page 1 Annex 1-7 Resolution 7 of the 1988 GMDSS Conference: Recommendation on the coding of satellite emergency position-indicating radio beacons operating in the COSPAS–SARSAT systemTHE CONFERENCE,HAVING ADOPTED the amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (SOLASConvention), concerning radiocommunications for the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS),NOTING that the Conference resolution recommending the early introduction of GMDSS elements refers interalia to satellite emergency position-indicating radio beacons (satellite EPIRBs),NOTING FURTHER that the COSPAS–SARSAT system allows the use of different protocols for coding satelliteEPIRBs and that, in particular, identification can be achieved either by a serial number or by using identificationin the maritime mobile service as defined by the Radio Regulations of the International TelecommunicationUnion (ITU),BEING OF THE OPINION that positive and reliable identification of ships in distress makes a decisive contributionto the effective conduct of search and rescue operations,1. INVITES the Maritime Safety Committee to undertake the study of this matter both on operational andtechnical levels and to take measures to ensure that the protocol used for coding EPIRBs makes it possible toidentify ships in distress with the greatest possible certainty;2. INVITES the COSPAS–SARSAT Council to study the matter urgently in consultation with ITU withrespect to CCIR recommendations and to assist the Maritime Safety Committee in making its decision.
  • Annex 1-8 – Page 1 GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-8 Resolution 8 of the 1988 GMDSS Conference: Promotion of technical co-operation with regard to the GMDSSTHE CONFERENCE,HAVING adopted the amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (SOLASConvention), concerning radiocommunications for the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS),BEING AWARE of the importance of modern radiocommunication techniques with a view to improving both thesafety of life at sea and international co-operation in technical and scientific resources,BEING AWARE ALSO of the imperative and immediate need to redress the imbalance in the availability oftelecommunication technology and services between developed and developing countries,RECOGNIZING that Contracting Governments to the SOLAS Convention, as amended in 1988, will be calledupon to make arrangements to ensure the effective operation of the GMDSS and to assume full responsibility forsuch arrangements,BEING CONVINCED that the promotion of technical co-operation at intergovernmental level will expedite theimplementation of the SOLAS Convention, as amended in 1988, by Contracting Governments that do not as yetpossess the necessary technical and scientific resources,NOTING with satisfaction that the International Maritime Organization has accorded, in its overall programme, ahigh priority to technical co-operation,1. RECORDS its appreciation of the Organization’s assistance to developing countries to enhance their mar-itime capabilities in conformity with global technical standards including radiocommunication standards;2. URGES Contracting Governments, in consultation with, and assisted by, the International MaritimeOrganization, to promote and provide on reasonable commercial terms and conditions, support to States re-questing technical assistance for: (a) the training of the required personnel; and (b) the provision of the equipment and facilities necessary for the introduction of the GMDSS;3. ALSO URGES Contracting Governments to implement the above-mentioned measures without awaitingthe entry into force of the amendments adopted;4. INVITES the Organization, in consultation or association with other United Nations specialized agencies asappropriate, particularly the International Telecommunication Union and the World Meteorological Organi-zation, to pursue the aforesaid efforts and, as necessary, to seek the collaboration of the International Hydro-graphic Organization, the International Maritime Satellite Organization, the COSPAS–SARSAT Council andthe World Maritime University;5. REQUESTS the Secretary-General to seek ways and means of securing the necessary funds to assist Stateswhich request assistance for the implementation of the amendments adopted.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-9 – Page 1 Annex 1-9 Resolution MSC.27(61): Adoption of amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (adopted on 11 December 1992)THE MARITIME SAFETY COMMITTEE,RECALLING Article 28(b) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Committee,RECALLING FURTHER article VIII(b) of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974,hereinafter referred to as ‘‘the Convention’’, concerning the procedures for amending the annex to the Con-vention, other than the provisions of chapter I thereof,HAVING CONSIDERED, at its sixty-first session, amendments to the Convention proposed and circulated inaccordance with article VIII(b)(i) thereof,1. ADOPTS, in accordance with article VIII(b)(iv) of the Convention, the amendments to the Convention, thetext of which is set out in the annex* to the present resolution;2. DETERMINES, in accordance with article VIII(b)(vi)(2)(bb) of the Convention, that the amendments shallbe deemed to have been accepted on 1 April 1994 unless, prior to the date, more than one third of theContracting Governments to the Convention, or Contracting Governments the combined merchant fleets ofwhich constitute not less than 50% of the gross tonnage of the world’s merchant fleet, have notified theirobjections to the amendments;3. INVITES Contracting Governments to note that, in accordance with Article VIII(b)(vii)(2) of the Con-vention, the amendments shall enter into force on 1 October 1994 upon their acceptance in accordance withparagraph 2 above:4. REQUESTS the Secretary-General, in conformity with article VIII(b)(v) of the Convention, to transmitcertified copies of the present resolution and the text of the amendments contained in the annex to all Con-tracting Governments to the Convention;5. FURTHER REQUESTS the Secretary-General to transmit copies of the resolution to Members of theOrganization which are not Contracting Governments to the Convention.* Only the amendments relevant to the GMDSS have been reproduced.
  • Annex 1-9 – Page 2 GMDSS Handbook Annex to resolution MSC.27(61) Amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 [...] CHAPTER IV RadiocommunicationsRegulation 13Sources of energy62 Replace the existing text of paragraphs 2.1 to 2.3 by: ‘‘.1 1 hour on ships provided with an emergency source of electrical power, if such source of power complies fully with all relevant provisions of regulation II-1/42 or 43, including the supply of such power to the radio installations; and .2 6 hours on ships not provided with an emergency source of electrical power complying fully with all relevant provisions of regulation II-1/42 or 43, including the supply of such power to the radio installations.’’63 Delete the reference in regulation IV/13.4 to paragraph 2.3.Regulation 14Performance standards64 Replace ‘‘by prescribed’’ in paragraph 2 with ‘‘prescribed by’’.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-10 – Page 1 Annex 1-10 Resolution 1 of the Conference of Contracting Governments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974: Adoption of amendments to the annex to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (adopted on 29 November 1995)THE CONFERENCE,RECALLING article VIII(c) of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (hereinafter referredto as ‘‘the Convention’’) concerning the procedure for amending the Convention by a Conference of ContractingGovernments,NOTING resolution A.596(15) adopted by the Assembly of the International Maritime Organization (IMO),concerning the safety of ro–ro ships,NOTING FURTHER resolutions MSC.11(55), MSC.12(56), MSC.24(60), MSC.26(60) and MSC.27(61) bywhich amendments to the Convention were adopted by the Maritime Safety Committee of IMO aimed atenhancing the safety of new and existing ro–ro passenger ships, as appropriate,EXPRESSING ITS CONCERN that, since the adoption of the aforementioned amendments, a number of ro–ropassenger ships have been involved in casualties, one of which has resulted in severe loss of life,RECOGNIZING the urgent need to further improve the safety standards in all aspects of the design, equipmentand operation of ro–ro passenger ships to avoid recurrence of such casualties,HAVING CONSIDERED amendments to the annex to the Convention proposed and circulated to all Members ofthe International Maritime Organization and all Contracting Governments to the Convention,1. ADOPTS, in accordance with article VIII(c)(ii) of the Convention, amendments to the annex to theConvention the text of which is set out in the annex* to the present resolution;2. DETERMINES, in accordance with article VIII(b)(vi)(2)(bb) of the Convention, that the amendments shallbe deemed to have been accepted on 1 January 1997, unless, prior to this date, more than one third of Con-tracting Governments to the Convention or Contracting Governments the combined merchant fleets of whichconstitute not less than 50% of the gross tonnage of the world’s merchant fleet, have notified their objections tothe amendments;3. INVITES Contracting Governments to note that, in accordance with article VIII(b)(vii)(2) of the Con-vention, the amendments shall enter into force on 1 July 1997 upon their acceptance in accordance withparagraph 2 above.* Only amendments relevant to the GMDSS have been reproduced.
  • Annex 1-10 – Page 2 GMDSS Handbook Annex to resolution 1 Amendments to the annex to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 [...] CHAPTER III Life-Saving Appliances and Arrangements Regulation 3 Definitions 22 The following new paragraph 19 is added after existing paragraph 18:‘‘19 Ro–ro passenger ship means a passenger ship with ro–ro cargo spaces or special category spaces as defined in regulation II-2/3.’’ Regulation 6 Communications 23 The following new paragraph 5 is added after existing paragraph 4:‘‘5 Public address systems on passenger ships 5.1 In addition to the requirements of regulation II-2/40.5 or regulation II-2/41-2, as appropriate, and of paragraph 4.2, all passenger ships shall be fitted with a public address system. With respect to passenger ships constructed before 1 July 1997 the requirements of paragraphs 5.2, 5.3 and 5.5, subject to the provisions of paragraph 5.6, shall apply not later than the date of the first periodical survey after 1 July 1997. 5.2 The public address system shall be one complete system consisting of a loudspeaker installation which enables simultaneous broadcast of messages to all spaces where crew members or passengers, or both, are normally present and to assembly stations. The public address system shall provide for the broadcast of messages from the navigation bridge and such other places on board as the Administration deems necessary. 5.3 The public address system shall be protected against unauthorized use and be clearly audible above the ambient noise in all spaces, prescribed by paragraph 5.2, and shall be provided with an override function con- trolled from one location on the navigation bridge and such other places on board as the Administration deems necessary, so that all emergency messages will be broadcast if any loudspeaker in the spaces concerned has been switched off, its volume has been turned down or the public address system is used for other purposes. 5.4 On passenger ships constructed on or after 1 July 1997: .1 the public address system shall have at least two loops which shall be sufficiently separated throughout their length and have two separate and independent amplifiers; and .2 the public address system and its performance standards shall be approved by the Administration having regard to the recommendations adopted by the Organization.*{ 5.5 The public address system shall be connected to the emergency source of power. 5.6 Ships constructed before 1 July 1997 which are already fitted with the public address system approved by the Administration which comply substantially with those required by paragraph 5.2, 5.3 and 5.5 are not required to change their system. ______ * Refer to the Code on Alarms and Indicators, 1995, adopted by the Organization by resolution A.830(19). { Refer to performance standards for public address systems, to be developed by the Organization.’’
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-10 – Page 3 24 The following new regulations 24-1 to 24-4 are added after existing regulation 24: Regulation 24–1 Requirements for ro–ro passenger ships 1 This regulation applies to all ro–ro passenger ships. Ro–ro passenger ships constructed: .1 on or after 1 July 1998 shall comply with the requirements of paragraphs 2.3, 2.4, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4 and 5; .2 on or after 1 July 1986 and before 1 July 1998 shall comply with paragraph 5 not later than the first periodical survey after 1 July 1998 and with paragraphs 2.3, 2.4, 3 and 4 not later than the first periodical survey after 1 July 2000; and .3 before 1 July 1986 shall comply with paragraph 5 not later than the first periodical survey after 1 July 1998 and with paragraphs 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 3 and 4 not later than the first periodical survey after 1 July 2000. [...] CHAPTER IV Radiocommunications Regulation 1 Application 25 In paragraph 5, the reference to ‘‘paragraph 4’’ is replaced by ‘‘paragraphs 4 and 7’’. 26 At the end of paragraph 5.1.2, after the existing date ‘‘1992’’ the phrase ‘‘; however, passenger ships irrespective of size shall not be granted any exemption from the requirements of regulation 3 of chapter IV of that Convention’’ is added. 27 The following new paragraph 7 is added after existing paragraph 6:‘‘7 Passenger ships constructed before 1 July 1997 shall, as appropriate, comply with the requirements of regulations 6.4, 6.5, 6.6 and 7.5 not later than the date of the first periodical survey after 1 July 1997.’’ 28 Existing paragraph 7 is renumbered as paragraph 8. Regulation 6 Radio installations 29 The following new paragraphs 4, 5 and 6 are added after existing paragraph 3:‘‘4 In passenger ships, a distress panel shall be installed at the conning position. This panel shall contain either one single button which, when pressed, initiates a distress alert using all radiocommunication installations re- quired on board for that purpose or one button for each individual installation. The panel shall clearly and visually indicate whenever any button or buttons have been pressed. Means shall be provided to prevent inadvertent activation of the button or buttons. If the satellite EPIRB is used as the secondary means of distress alerting and is not remotely activated, it shall be acceptable to have an additional EPIRB installed in the wheelhouse near the conning position. 5 In passenger ships, information on the ship’s position shall be continuously and automatically provided to all relevant radiocommunication equipment to be included in the initial distress alert when the button or buttons on the distress panel is pressed.
  • Annex 1-10 – Page 4 GMDSS Handbook 6 In passenger ships, a distress alarm panel shall be installed at the conning position. The distress alarm panel shall provide visual and aural indication of any distress alert or alerts received on board and shall also indicate through which radiocommunication service the distress alerts have been received.’’ Regulation 7 Radio equipment: General 30 The following new paragraph 5 is added after existing paragraph 4:‘‘5 Every passenger ship shall be provided with means for two-way on-scene radiocommunications for search and rescue purposes using the aeronautical frequencies 121.5 MHz and 123.1 MHz from the position from which the ship is normally navigated.’’ Regulation 16 Radio personnel 31 The existing paragraph is numbered as paragraph 1. 32 The following new paragraph 2 is added after the renumbered paragraph 1:‘‘2 In passenger ships, at least one person qualified in accordance with paragraph 1 shall be assigned to perform only radiocommunication duties during distress incidents.’’
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-11 – Page 1 Annex 1-11 Resolution MSC.47(66): Adoption of amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (adopted on 4 June 1996)THE MARITIME SAFETY COMMITTEE,RECALLING Article 28(b) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Committee,RECALLING FURTHER article VIII(b) of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS),1974, hereinafter referred to as ‘‘the Convention’’, concerning the procedures for amending the annex to theConvention, other than the provisions of chapter I thereof,HAVING CONSIDERED, at its sixty-sixth session, amendments to the Convention proposed and circulated inaccordance with article VIII(b)(i) thereof,1. ADOPTS, in accordance with article VIII(b)(iv) of the Convention, amendments to the Convention the textof which is set out in the annex* to the present resolution;2. DETERMINES, in accordance with article VIII(b)(vi)(2)(bb) of the Convention, that the amendments shallbe deemed to have been accepted on 1 January 1998, unless, prior to that date, more than one third of theContracting Governments to the Convention or Contracting Governments the combined merchant fleets ofwhich constitute not less than 50% of the gross tonnage of the world’s merchant fleet, have notified theirobjections to the amendments;3. INVITES Contracting Governments to note that, in accordance with article VIII(b)(vii)(2) of the Con-vention, the amendments shall enter into force on 1 July 1998 upon their acceptance in accordance withparagraph 2 above;4. REQUESTS the Secretary-General, in conformity with article VIII(b)(v) of the Convention, to transmitcertified copies of the present resolution and the text of the amendments contained in the annex to all Con-tracting Governments to the Convention;5. FURTHER REQUESTS the Secretary-General to transmit copies of this resolution and its annex to Membersof the Organization, which are not Contracting Governments to the Convention.* Only the amendments relevant to the GMDSS have been reproduced.
  • Annex 1-11 – Page 2 GMDSS Handbook Annex to resolution MSC.47(66) Amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 [...]8 The existing text of chapter III is replaced by the following: ‘‘CHAPTER III Life-Saving Appliances and Arrangements [...] Part B Requirements for ships and life-saving appliances SECTION I – PASSENGER SHIPS AND CARGO SHIPSRegulation 6Communications1 Paragraph 2 applies to all passenger ships and to all cargo ships of 300 gross tonnage and upwards.2 Radio life-saving appliances2.1 Two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus2.1.1 At least three two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus shall be provided on every passenger ship and onevery cargo ship of 500 gross tonnage and upwards. At least two two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus shall beprovided on every cargo ship of 300 gross tonnage and upwards but less than 500 gross tonnage. Such apparatusshall conform to performance standards not inferior to those adopted by the Organization.* If a fixed two-wayVHF radiotelephone apparatus is fitted in a survival craft it shall conform to performance standards not inferior tothose adopted by Organization.*2.1.2 Two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus provided on board ships prior to 1 February 1992 and notcomplying fully with the performance standards adopted by the Organization may be accepted by the Admin-istration until 1 February 1999 provided the Administration is satisfied that they are compatible with approvedtwo-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus.2.2 Radar transpondersAt least one radar transponder shall be carried on each side of every passenger ship and of every cargo ship of 500gross tonnage and upwards. At least one radar transponder shall be carried on every cargo ship of 300 grosstonnage and upwards but less than 500 gross tonnage. Such radar transponders shall conform to performancestandards not inferior to those adopted by the Organization.{ The radar transponders{ shall be stowed in suchlocations that they can be rapidly placed in any survival craft other than the liferaft or liferafts required byregulation 31.1.4. Alternatively one radar transponder shall be stowed in each survival craft other than thoserequired by regulation 31.1.4. On ships carrying at least two radar transponders and equipped with free-falllifeboats one of the radar transponders shall be stowed in a free-fall lifeboat and the other located in the immediatevicinity of the navigation bridge so that it can be utilized on board and ready for transfer to any of the othersurvival craft.* Refer to the Performance standards for survival craft two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus adopted by the Organization by resolution A.809(19),as it may be amended, annex 1 or annex 2 as applicable.{ Refer to the Performance standards for survival craft radar transponders for use in search and rescue operations adopted by the Organization byresolution A.802(19), as it may be amended.{ One of these radar transponders may be the radar transponder required by regulation IV/7.1.3.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-11 – Page 33 Distress flaresNot less than 12 rocket parachute flares, complying with the requirements of section 3.1 of the Code, shall becarried and be stowed on or near the navigation bridge.4 On-board communications and alarm systems4.1 An emergency means comprised of either fixed or portable equipment or both shall be provided for two-way communications between emergency control stations, muster and embarkation stations and strategic posi-tions on board.4.2 A general emergency alarm system complying with the requirements of paragraph 7.2.1 of the Code shall beprovided and shall be used for summoning passengers and crew to muster stations and to initiate the actionsincluded in the muster list. The system shall be supplemented by either a public address system complying withthe requirements of paragraph 7.2.2 of the Code or other suitable means of communication. Entertainment soundsystems shall automatically be turned off when the general emergency alarm system is activated.4.3 On passenger ships the general emergency alarm system shall be audible on all open decks.4.4 On ships fitted with a marine evacuation system communication between the embarkation station and theplatform or the survival craft shall be ensured.5 Public address systems on passenger ships5.1 In addition to the requirements of regulation II-2/40.5 or regulation II-2/41.2, as appropriate, and ofparagraph 6.4.2, all passenger ships shall be fitted with a public address system. With respect to passenger shipsconstructed before 1 July 1997 the requirements of paragraphs 5.2 and 5.4, subject to the provisions of paragraph5.5, shall apply not later than the date of the first periodical survey after 1 July 1997.5.2 The public address system shall be clearly audible above the ambient noise in all spaces, prescribed byparagraph 7.2.2.1 of the Code, and shall be provided with an override function controlled from one location onthe navigation bridge and such other places on board as the Administration deems necessary, so that all emergencymessages will be broadcast if any loudspeaker in the spaces concerned has been switched off, its volume has beenturned down or the public address system is used for other purposes.5.3 On passenger ships constructed on or after 1 July 1997: .1 the public address system shall have at least two loops which shall be sufficiently separated throughout their length and have two separate and independent amplifiers; and .2 the public address system and its performance standards shall be approved by the Administration having regard to the recommendations adopted by the Organization.*{5.4 The public address system shall be connected to the emergency source of electrical power required byregulation II-1/42.2.2.5.5 Ships constructed before 1 July 1997 which are already fitted with the public address system approved by theAdministration which complies substantially with those required by sections 5.2 and 5.4 and paragraph 7.2.2.1 ofthe Code are not required to change their system.______* Refer to the Code on Alarms and Indicators, 1995, adopted by the Organization by resolution A.830(19).{ Refer to performance standards for public address systems, to be developed by the Organization.’’ [...]
  • Annex 1-12 – Page 1 GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-12 Resolution MSC.69(69): Adoption of amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended (adopted on 18 May 1998)THE MARITIME SAFETY COMMITTEE,RECALLING Article 28(b) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Committee,RECALLING FURTHER article VIII(b) of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS),1974, hereinafter referred to as ‘‘the Convention’’, concerning the procedures for amending the annex to theConvention other than chapter I,HAVING CONSIDERED, at its sixty-ninth session, amendments to the Convention proposed and circulated inaccordance with article VIII(b)(i) thereof,1. ADOPTS, in accordance with article VIII(b)(iv) of the Convention, amendments to the Convention the textof which is set out in the annex* to the present resolution;2. DETERMINES, in accordance with article VIII(b)(vi)(2)(bb) of the Convention, that the amendments shallbe deemed to have been accepted on 1 January 2002, unless, prior to that date, more than one third of theContracting Governments to the Convention or Contracting Governments the combined merchant fleets ofwhich constitute not less than 50% of the gross tonnage of the world’s merchant fleet, have notified theirobjections to the amendments;3. INVITES Contracting Governments to note that, in accordance with article VIII(b)(vii)(2) of the Con-vention, the amendments shall enter into force on 1 July 2002 upon their acceptance in accordance withparagraph 2 above;4. REQUESTS the Secretary-General, in conformity with article VIII(b)(v) of the Convention, to transmitcertified copies of the present resolution and the text of the amendments contained in the annex to all Con-tracting Governments to the Convention;5. FURTHER REQUESTS the Secretary-General to transmit copies of this resolution and its annex to Membersof the Organization, which are not Contracting Governments to the Convention.* Only the amendments relevant to the GMDSS have been reproduced.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 1-12 – Page 2 Annex to resolution MSC.69(69) Amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended [...] CHAPTER IV Radiocommunications Regulation 1 Application 2 In paragraph 1, the words ‘‘Unless expressly provided otherwise,‘‘ are inserted before the words ‘‘this chapter’’. Regulation 2 Terms and definitions 3 The following new subparagraph .16 of paragraph 1 is added after existing subparagraph .15: ‘‘.16 Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) identities means maritime mobile services identity, the ship’s call sign, Inmarsat identities and serial number identity which may be transmitted by the ship’s equipment and used to identify the ship.’’ 4 The existing text of paragraph 2 is replaced by the following: ‘‘2 All other terms and abbreviations which are used in this chapter and which are defined in the Radio Regulations and in the International Convention on Maritime Search and Rescue (SAR), 1979, as may be amended, shall have the meanings as defined in those Regulations and the SAR Convention.’’ 5 The following new regulation 5-1 is added after existing regulation 5: ‘‘Regulation 5-1 Global maritime distress and safety system identities 1 This regulation applies to all ships on all voyages. 2 Each Contracting Government undertakes to ensure that suitable arrangements are made for registering global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) identities and for making information on these identities available to rescue co-ordination centres on a 24-hour basis. Where appropriate, international organizations maintaining a registry of these identities shall be notified by the Contracting Government of these assignments.’’ Regulation 13 Sources of energy 6 In paragraph 8, the words ‘‘, including the navigation receiver referred to in regulation 18,’’ are inserted after the word ‘‘chapter’’. Regulation 15 Maintenance requirements 7 The following new paragraph 9 is added after existing paragraph 8:‘‘9 Satellite EPIRBs shall be tested at intervals not exceeding 12 months for all aspects of operational efficiency with particular emphasis on frequency stability, signal strength and coding. However, in cases where it appears proper and reasonable, the Administration may extend this period to 17 months. The test may be conducted on board the ship or at an approved testing or servicing station.’’
  • Annex 1-12 – Page 3 GMDSS Handbook8 The following new regulation 18 is added after existing regulation 17:‘‘Regulation 18Position-updatingAll two-way communication equipment carried on board a ship to which this chapter applies which is capable ofautomatically including the ship’s position in the distress alert shall be automatically provided with this in-formation from an internal or external navigation receiver, if either is installed. If such a receiver is not installed,the ship’s position and the time at which the position was determined shall be manually updated at intervals notexceeding 4 hours, while the ship is under way, so that it is always ready for transmission by the equipment.’’
  • Annex 2 IMO Assembly and MSC resolutions relevant to the GMDSS* Resolution Annex 2-1 – Use of the COSPAS–SARSAT low polar orbiting satellite EPIRB system A.568(14) Annex 2-2 – Type approval of ship earth stations A.570(14) Annex 2-3 – Review and evaluation of the global maritime distress and safety system A.606(15) (GMDSS) Annex 2-4 – Carriage of radar operating in the frequency band 9300–9500 MHz A.614(15) Annex 2-5 – Search and rescue homing capability A.616(15) Annex 2-6 – Implementation of the NAVTEX system as a component of the A.617(15) World-Wide Navigational Warning Service Annex 2-7 – Carriage of satellite emergency position-indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs) A.660(16) Annex 2-8 – Type approval of satellite EPIRBs operating in the COSPAS–SARSAT A.696(17) system Annex 2-9 – Carriage of Inmarsat Enhanced Group Call SafetyNET receivers under the A.701(17) GMDSS Annex 2-10 – Radio maintenance guidelines for the GMDSS related to sea areas A3 and A4 A.702(17) Annex 2-11 – Training of radio personnel in the GMDSS A.703(17) Annex 2-12 – Promulgation of maritime safety information A.705(17) Annex 2-13 – World-Wide Navigational Warning Service A.706(17) Annex 2-14 – Charges for distress, urgency and safety messages through the Inmarsat system A.707(17) Annex 2-15 – Procedures and arrangements for issuing GMDSS certificates to holders of A.769(18) non-GMDSS certificates Annex 2-16 – Provision of radio services for the GMDSS A.801(19) Annex 2-17 – Guidelines for the avoidance of false distress alerts A.814(19) Annex 2-18 – Establishment, updating and retrieval of the information contained in the A.887(21) registration databases for the GMDSS Annex 2-19 – Criteria for the provision of mobile-satellite communication systems A.888(21) in the GMDSS Annex 2-20 – Maintenance of a continuous listening watch on VHF channel 16 by MSC.77(69) SOLAS ships whilst at sea after 1 February 1999 and installation of VHF DSC facilities on non-SOLAS ships* Excluding those related to the performance standards for the GMDSS radio equipment.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-1 – Page 1 Annex 2-1 Resolution A.568(14) (Adopted on 20 November 1985) USE OF THE COSPAS–SARSAT LOW POLAR ORBITING SATELLITE EPIRB SYSTEMTHE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,RECOGNIZING the need to improve maritime safety and to promote safety of life at sea,NOTING that the Maritime Safety Committee has identified functional requirements and draft carriage re-quirements for the future global maritime distress and safety system which include the extensive use of satellitefacilities,NOTING ALSO that a number of countries are performing trials with the COSPAS–SARSAT system based onthe use of low-orbital near-polar satellites,NOTING FURTHER that the COSPAS–SARSAT Parties have invited Member Governments to participate inthe COSPAS–SARSAT system,BEARING IN MIND that the COSPAS–SARSAT system has demonstrated effective alerting and a high accuracyof determining the position of units in distress and has been successfully used in a number of real emergencysituations,BEING AWARE that the COSPAS–SARSAT system provides for use of existing emergency position-indicatingradio beacons operating on 121.5 MHz with technical characteristics in accordance with ITU Radio Regulationsand also for use of newly developed emergency position-indicating radio beacons operating in the frequency band406 MHz to 406.1 MHz,ALSO BEING AWARE that the World Administrative Radio Conference for the Mobile Services, 1983, adoptedresolution No. 205 relating to the protection of the frequency band 406 MHz to 406.1 MHz allocated to themobile-satellite service,HAVING CONSIDERED the recommendation made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its fiftieth session,1. RECOMMENDS Member Governments: (a) to encourage the use of the COSPAS–SARSAT system for alerting and position determination of units in distress using emergency position-indicating radio beacons; (b) to participate in evaluating the COSPAS–SARSAT system using emergency position-indicating radio beacons operating in the frequency band 406 MHz to 406.1 MHz; (c) to take appropriate measures to cease unauthorized transmissions in the frequency band 406 MHz to 406.1 MHz and also to participate in the monitoring programme of the International Frequency Registration Board of the International Telecommunication Union for identifying and eliminating interference caused by unauthorized equipment operating or causing interference in this band;2. RECOMMENDS Member Governments that are COSPAS–SARSAT Parties to inform the Organizationregularly of the result of their trials and to submit a final report to the Organization.
  • Annex 2-2 – Page 1 GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-2 Resolution A.570(14) (Adopted on 20 November 1985) TYPE APPROVAL OF SHIP EARTH STATIONSTHE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,RECOGNIZING that ship earth stations should be type approved to ensure their operational reliability and toavoid adverse interaction between this equipment and other communication and navigational equipment aboardship,FURTHER RECOGNIZING the value of the centralized type approval conducted by the International MaritimeSatellite Organization (Inmarsat) in minimizing the duplication of effort in type approval,HAVING CONSIDERED the recommendation made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its fiftieth session,1. RECOMMENDS Member Governments to accept type approval of ship earth stations by Inmarsat as suf-ficient for their national type acceptance of such equipment, in respect of those aspects relating to the Inmarsattechnical requirements;2. REQUESTS Inmarsat, at the invitation of interested Administrations: (a) to encourage manufacturers to include tests covering additional national requirements of those Ad- ministrations in the Inmarsat type approval testing; (b) to certify that such additional tests have been successfully performed, in order to facilitate national type acceptance procedures.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-3 – Page 1 Annex 2-3 Resolution A.606(15) (Adopted on 19 November 1987) REVIEW AND EVALUATION OF THE GLOBAL MARITIME DISTRESS AND SAFETY SYSTEM (GMDSS)THE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,NOTING the decisions of the WARC-MOB-87, related to the introduction of the GMDSS,NOTING FURTHER the provisions of the preliminary draft of a revised chapter IV of the International Con-vention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, developed for the purpose of establishing the requirements for theintroduction of the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS),RECOGNIZING the importance of the GMDSS for the safety of life at sea,RECOGNIZING ALSO that the GMDSS is provisionally planned to be implemented between 1 August 1991 and1 February 1997,BEARING IN MIND the recommendations contained in resolution A.500(XII), concerning the costs and benefitsto the maritime industry of the measures adopted by the Organization,BEARING ALSO IN MIND that the investment required for ships to comply with the requirements of the GMDSSmay, in many areas, be higher than the investment needed to meet present requirements, in particular for cargoships of less than 1,600 gross tonnage,CONSIDERING that a review of the requirements for MF DSC, VHF DSC and HF NBDP on cargo ships of lessthan 1,600 gross tonnage, as set out in this resolution, was a condition for the agreement on GMDSS carriagerequirements for these ships and that DSC requirements for ships over 1,600 gross tonnage will be applicablewhen DSC equipment is available,FURTHER CONSIDERING the importance of keeping the operation of the GMDSS and the technical develop-ments related thereto under review,REQUESTS the Maritime Safety Committee* to: (a) keep under review the requirements for MF DSC, VHF DSC and HF NBDP on ships of 300 gross tonnage and over but less than 1,600 gross tonnage and for MF DSC and VHF DSC on ships of 1,600 gross tonnage and over, in the light of the cost and demonstrated effectiveness of such facilities compared with alternative systems which may become available prior to the entry into force of the relevant carriage requirements; (b) review and evaluate the experience gained with the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) and determine whether, in the future, there is a need to adjust the requirements of the system.* The 37th session of COM Sub-Committee concluded that there was no reason to modify ships’ carriage requirements with respect to DSC andNBDP equipment (COM 37/17, paragraphs 3.14 and 3.15).
  • Annex 2-4 – Page 1 GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-4 Resolution A.614(15) (Adopted on 19 November 1987) CARRIAGE OF RADAR OPERATING IN THE FREQUENCY BAND 9,300–9,500 MHzTHE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,NOTING the decision of the Maritime Safety Committee that a 9 GHz radar transponder should provide themain means in the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) for locating survival craft,NOTING FURTHER the provisions of regulation V/12 of the International Convention for the Safety of Life atSea, 1974, require that: (a) ships of 500 tons gross tonnage and upwards constructed on or after 1 September 1984 and ships of 1,600 tons gross tonnage and upwards constructed before 1 September 1984 shall be fitted with a radar installation, and (b) ships of 10,000 tons gross tonnage and upwards shall be fitted with two radar installations,BEARING IN MIND that the performance standards for radar equipment, adopted by resolution A.477(XII), donot specify which frequency band should be used for ships’ radar equipment,HAVING CONSIDERED the recommendation made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its fifty-third session,RECOMMENDS Member Governments to ensure that on ships equipped with a radar installation or installationsat least one radar operates in the 9,300–9,500 MHz frequency band.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-5 – Page 1 Annex 2-5 Resolution A.616(15) (Adopted on 19 November 1987) SEARCH AND RESCUE HOMING CAPABILITYTHE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,RECALLING ALSO that the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended, requires byregulation V/12(q) that all new ships of 1,600 tons gross tonnage and upwards when engaged on internationalvoyages be fitted with radio equipment for homing on the radiotelephone distress frequency,RECALLING FURTHER that resolution A.221(VII) recommends Contracting Governments to the InternationalConvention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1960, to encourage the fitting of ships of less than 1,600 tons grosstonnage with radio equipment for homing on the radiotelephone distress frequency,FURTHER RECALLING that resolution A.225(VII) strongly recommends that all search and rescue aircraft beequipped with direction-finders of sufficient sensitivity and frequency coverage to permit homing on radiotransmissions on all distress frequencies and transmissions of emergency position-indicating radio beacons usinginternationally approved frequencies,BEARING IN MIND that the radiotelephone distress frequency 2,182 kHz will not be used for homing in theglobal maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS),NOTING that the Maritime Safety Committee has decided that a 9 GHz radar transponder should provide themain means for locating in the system,NOTING FURTHER that: (a) there will be a need for locating or determining the bearings of ships in distress by rescue units, as defined in the 1979 SAR Convention, participating in rescue operations and engaged in on-scene communications, (b) some homing equipment can be modified relatively easily to permit homing on satellite emergency position-indicating radio beacons transmitting on the frequency 406 MHz, (c) the VHF/FM 156 MHz system will be a primary radio system in the GMDSS for on-scene com- munications in all sea areas, (d) the VHF/FM 156 MHz system is a recognized radio system in the GMDSS for communication with survival craft, (e) there will be a need to locate ships to which chapter IV of the 1974 SOLAS Convention does not apply that are in distress and which are generally equipped with at least VHF radiotelephony, (f) the VHF/AM 121.5/243 MHz aeronautical system is presently widely used for ships’ emergency position-indicating radio beacons and aircraft emergency locating transmitters to enable aircraft to locate ships and aircraft so equipped when in distress, (g) such use by ships and aircraft of the 121.5/243 MHz aeronautical system is likely to continue for a considerable time after the implementation of the GMDSS, (h) there will be a consequent need for rescue units to be able to home on transmissions on appropriate VHF/FM frequencies specified in appendix 18 of the Radio Regulations, and channel 16 in particular, as well as on the VHF/AM frequency 121.5 MHz,
  • Annex 2-5 – Page 2 GMDSS HandbookHAVING CONSIDERED the recommendation made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its fifty-fourth session,RECOMMENDS Member Governments to: (a) consider the need and, if appropriate, equip rescue units under their jurisdiction with devices suitable for homing or direction-finding on the appropriate VHF/FM frequencies specified in appendix 18 of the Radio Regulations and the VHF/AM 121.5 MHz frequency; (b) consider the need and, if appropriate, equip the SAR aircraft under their jurisdiction with devices suitable for homing on satellite EPIRB transmissions in the 406 MHz band; (c) equip rescue units under their jurisdiction with radar compatible with the 9 GHz search and rescue radar transponder; (d) encourage voluntary carriage by ships and other craft entitled to fly their flag of direction-finding or homing devices suitable for transmission on the appropriate VHF/FM frequencies specified in ap- pendix 18 of the Radio Regulations or the VHF/AM 121.5 MHz frequency or on all such frequencies; and (e) consider the need and, where necessary, establish facilities for VHF direction-finding on their coasts.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-6 – Page 1 Annex 2-6 Resolution A.617(15) (Adopted on 19 November 1987) IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NAVTEX SYSTEM AS A COMPONENT OF THE WORLD-WIDE NAVIGATIONAL WARNING SERVICETHE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,RECALLING ALSO resolution A.419(XI)* by which it established the World-Wide Navigational Warning Ser-vice,RECALLING ADDITIONALLY resolution A.420(XI){ concerning development of the maritime distress and safetysystem,RECALLING FURTHER resolution A.525(13){ by which it adopted performance standards for narrow-banddirect-printing telegraph equipment for the reception of navigational and meteorological warnings and urgentinformation to ships,BEARING IN MIND the decisions of the XIth and XIIth International Hydrographic Conference,BEARING IN MIND ALSO Recommendation 540-1} of the International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR)of ITU,BEARING IN MIND FURTHER that the World Administrative Radio Conference for the Mobile Services, 1987,allocated the frequency 518 kHz for the international NAVTEX system, as well as the frequencies 490 kHz and4209.5 kHz for other NAVTEX-type systems;NOTING that a number of countries are currently providing a NAVTEX service to ships operating in coastalwaters,NOTING ALSO that the Maritime Safety Committee has identified functional requirements and draft carriagerequirements for the maritime distress and safety system which include the use of the NAVTEX system,HAVING CONSIDERED the recommendations made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its fiftieth, fifty-firstand fifty-second sessions,1. ADOPTS the automated direct-printing telegraph system for promulgation of navigational and meteor-ological warnings and urgent information to ships (NAVTEX) as a component of the World-Wide NavigationalWarning Service on the basis of the recommendation set out in the annex to the present resolution;2. INVITES Member Governments to commence NAVTEX broadcasts as soon as practicable, in accordancewith resolution A.420(XI){ and the present resolution, to serve those coastal areas where the safety of navigationwarrants such a service;3. ALSO INVITES Member Governments wishing to establish, augment or alter any NAVTEX service toforward all relevant information to the Organization;* Superseded by resolution A.706(17) (see annex 2-13){ Overtaken by 1988 (GMDSS) amendments to SOLAS.{ See annex 3-5-1.} Amended as 540-2 (see annex 3-5-5).
  • Annex 2-6 – Page 2 GMDSS Handbook4. FURTHER INVITES Member Governments to encourage their ships to be fitted as soon as practicable withNAVTEX equipment which conforms to performance standards not inferior to those specified in resolutionA.525(13);*5. AUTHORIZES the Maritime Safety Committee to agree to such departures from the principles and stan-dards set out in the Recommendation annexed to the present resolution as it may deem necessary in individualcases to serve the interests of safety of navigation;6. REQUESTS the Maritime Safety Committee to keep the Recommendation under review in the light ofexperience gained in its application and to report as necessary to the Assembly. Annex RECOMMENDATION ON THE ESTABLISHMENT AND OPERATION OF NAVTEX SERVICES (contents superseded by NAVTEX Manual){* See annex 3-5-1.{ See annex 4-2.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-7 – Page 1 Annex 2-7 Resolution A.660(16) (Adopted on 19 October 1989) CARRIAGE OF SATELLITE EMERGENCY POSITION-INDICATING RADIO BEACONS (EPIRBs)THE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,RECOGNIZING that emergency position-indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs) improve the safety of life at sea bygreatly facilitating search and rescue,RECALLING that resolution A.522(13) recommends Administrations to encourage the carriage of float-freeEPIRBs operating on frequencies compatible with the existing satellite search and rescue services,RECALLING FURTHER that the Maritime Safety Committee at its fifty-second session recommended carriage ofsurvival craft radar transponders, as an equivalent arrangement to the survival craft EPIRBs required by regulationIII/6.2.3 of the 1983 SOLAS amendments, and also recommended that the ship itself be fitted with a satelliteEPIRB in order to provide the alerting function,*NOTING that the Conference of Contracting Governments to the International Convention for the Safety of Lifeat Sea, 1974, on the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS Conference, 1988) adopted resolution4 – Recommendation on the early introduction of GMDSS radio life-saving appliances, which recommends that,where a means of transmitting signals for locating is provided on board a ship, Administrations accept a satelliteEPIRB as equivalent to the survival craft EPIRBs,NOTING ALSO the favourable experience already gained with EPIRBs operating in conjunction with theCOSPAS–SARSAT system,NOTING FURTHER that the GMDSS Conference, by regulation IV/7.1.6 of the 1988 SOLAS amendments, hasadopted provisions, applicable not later than 1 August 1993, for the carriage of a float-free satellite EPIRB onevery ship as part of the global maritime distress and safety system,HAVING CONSIDERED the recommendation made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its fifty-seventhsession,RECOMMENDS that Administrations encourage the early fitting of float-free satellite EPIRBs prior to the date ofentry into force of the requirements of chapter IV of the 1988 SOLAS amendments for the carriage of satelliteEPIRBs on ships.* MSC/Circ. 423 on Equivalent arrangements for survival craft emergency position-indicating radio beacons.
  • Annex 2-8 – Page 1 GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-8 Resolution A.696(17) (Adopted on 6 November 1991) TYPE APPROVAL OF SATELLITE EMERGENCY POSITION-INDICATING RADIO BEACONS (EPIRBs) OPERATING IN THE COSPAS–SARSAT SYSTEMTHE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,NOTING that the Conference of Contracting Governments to the International Convention for the Safety of Lifeat Sea, 1974 (SOLAS 1974), on the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS Conference, 1988)adopted regulation IV/7.1.6 of the 1988 SOLAS amendments, applicable not later than 1 August 1993, requiringthe carriage of a float-free satellite EPIRB on every ship as part of the global maritime distress and safety system,NOTING Assembly resolution A.695(17)*, ‘‘Performance Standards for Float-Free Satellite Emergency Position-Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs) operating on 406 MHz’’,NOTING FURTHER resolution 3{, ‘‘Recommendation on the early introduction of GMDSS elements’’, adoptedby the 1988 GMDSS Conference, which recommends, inter alia, that satellite EPIRBs be introduced as early aspossible,RECOGNIZING that satellite EPIRBs forming part of the global maritime distress and safety system and operatingthrough the COSPAS–SARSAT satellite system in the frequency band 406–406.1 MHz (406 MHz EPIRBs)should be type approved to ensure the integrity of the COSPAS–SARSAT satellite system, to avoid harmfulinterference to the spaceborne equipment, to exclude unauthorized transmissions and to provide reliable data torescue co-ordination centres,RECOGNIZING FURTHER the value of the type approval procedure proposed by the COSPAS–SARSATpartners in order to ensure that satellite EPIRBs will not degrade system performance and will be compatible withthe spaceborne equipment,HAVING CONSIDERED the recommendation made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its fifty-eighth session,RECOMMENDS Governments: (a) to ensure, as part of national type approval procedures, that any new type of 406 MHz satellite EPIRB to be deployed on board ships is tested to confirm that it is in accordance with the IMO performance standards for 406 MHz EPIRBs (resolution A.695(17)*); confirmation that the satellite EPIRB meets part B of that performance standard can be achieved by either: (i) performing, or having performed, under national procedures, all appropriate tests; or (ii) accepting type approval test results obtained through the COSPAS–SARSAT type approval procedure (C/S T.007) and confirmed by the delivery of a COSPAS–SARSAT Type Approval Certificate; and (b) to encourage national type approval authorities to develop test procedures compatible, to the extent possible, with C/S T.007, if necessary in consultation with the COSPAS–SARSAT Secretariat.* This has been superseded by resolution A.810(19) (see annex 3-3-1).{ See annex 1-3.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-9 – Page 1 Annex 2-9 Resolution A.701(17) (Adopted on 6 November 1991) CARRIAGE OF INMARSAT ENHANCED GROUP CALL SAFETYNET RECEIVERS UNDER THE GLOBAL MARITIME DISTRESS AND SAFETY SYSTEM (GMDSS)THE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,RECALLING ALSO that carriage of Inmarsat SafetyNET receive facilities is required under regulation IV/7.1.5 ofthe 1988 amendments to the 1974 SOLAS Convention concerning radiocommunications for the global maritimedistress and safety system (GMDSS),RECOGNIZING that performance standards for such equipment are prescribed in resolution A.664(16),*NOTING that resolution A.702(17){ on radio maintenance guidelines for the GMDSS related to sea areas A3 andA4 does not require duplication of the enhanced group call receive facility in ships opting for equipmentduplication,NOTING ALSO that resolution A.664(16) allows such equipment to be combined with an Inmarsat-C or In-marsat-A ship earth station (SES), or other equipment,NOTING FURTHER that such equipment combined with another SES may miss important maritime safetyinformation (MSI), if that SES is left tuned to an ocean region satellite other than the one broadcasting relevantmaritime safety information,RECOMMENDS that, in order to ensure reception of MSI broadcasts via the International SafetyNET service: (a) MSI providers make: (i) unscheduled SafetyNET broadcasts of distress alerts and urgent warnings through all Inmarsat ocean region satellites covering their area of responsibility; (ii) routine SafetyNET broadcasts through at least one designated satellite in accordance with a pre- arranged schedule co-ordinated by the Organization; (b) Governments ensure that up-to-date publications providing information on MSI broadcasts are in- cluded among the nautical publications required to be carried aboard ships in accordance with SOLAS regulation V/20; (c) Governments encourage ships to carry an Inmarsat enhanced group call receive facility, with an omnidirectional antenna, dedicated to the reception of MSI via the International SafetyNET service.* See annex 3-5-2.{ See annex 2-10.
  • Annex 2-10 – Page 1 GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-10 Resolution A.702(17) (Adopted on 6 November 1991) RADIO MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES FOR THE GLOBAL MARITIME DISTRESS AND SAFETY SYSTEM (GMDSS) RELATED TO SEA AREAS A3 AND A4THE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,NOTING regulation IV/15, Maintenance requirements, of the International Convention for the Safety of Life atSea, 1974 (SOLAS), as amended by the 1988 GMDSS Conference, and in particular regulation IV/15.7 con-cerning the methods of ensuring the availability of the functional requirements specified in regulation IV/4, fordistress and safety purposes on ships engaged on voyages in sea areas A3 and A4,NOTING ALSO resolution 5 of the 1988 GMDSS Conference which requests the Maritime Safety Committee toperiodically review the requirements of regulation IV/15.7 in the light of experience gained,HAVING CONSIDERED the recommendation made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its fifty-ninth session,1. ADOPTS the Guidelines for Ensuring the Availability of Radio Equipment for Ships Engaged on Voyages inSea Areas A3 and A4 Required by Regulation IV/15.7 of the 1974 SOLAS Convention, as Amended in 1988, setout in the annex to the present resolution:2. RECOMMENDS that Governments, in applying regulation IV/15.7 to ships, take account of the annexedGuidelines;3. REQUESTS the Maritime Safety Committee, when periodically reviewing the requirements of regulationIV/15.7, also to review and update the Guidelines as appropriate and to report as necessary to the Assembly. Annex GUIDELINES FOR ENSURING THE AVAILABILITY OF RADIO EQUIPMENT FOR SHIPS ENGAGED ON VOYAGES IN SEA AREAS A3 AND A4 REQUIRED BY REGULATION IV/15.7 OF THE 1974 SOLAS CONVENTION, AS AMENDED IN 19881 BASIC REQUIREMENT FOR ENSURING AVAILABILITY1.1 Irrespective of the methods used to ensure the availability of the functional requirements specified inregulation IV/4, and as specified in regulation IV/15.8, a ship should not depart from any port unless and until theship is capable of performing all distress and safety functions, as set out in regulation IV/4.1.2 Irrespective of the methods used by the ship, all manufacturers’ instruction manuals and maintenancemanuals for each piece of equipment required and installed should be available on board. Adequate tools, spareparts and test equipment appropriate to the methods used by the ship, as specified by the Administration, shouldbe provided. The manuals, tools, spare parts and test equipment, as applicable, should be readily accessible.2 DUPLICATION OF EQUIPMENT FOR ENSURING AVAILABILITY2.1 If availability is ensured by using a combination of methods which includes duplication of equipment, inaddition to the radio installations required by regulations IV/7, IV/10 and IV/11, as appropriate, the followingradio installations complying with regulation IV/14 should be available on board ships engaged on voyages in:
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-10 – Page 2 .1 sea area A3 – a VHF radio installation complying with the requirements of regulation IV/7.1.1 and either an MF/HF radio installation complying with the requirements of regulation IV/10.2.1 and being able to comply fully with the watch requirements of IV/12.1.3 or an Inmarsat ship earth station (SES) complying with the requirements of regulation IV/10.1.1. The MF/HF installation or Inmarsat SES installed for duplication should also comply with regulation IV/10.3; .2 sea areas A3 and A4 – a VHF radio installation complying with the requirements of regulation IV/7.1.1 and an MF/HF radio installation complying with the requirements of regulation IV/10.2.1 and being able to comply fully with the watch requirements of IV/12.1.3. Ships operating in sea area A4 only occasionally and having originally installed an MF/HF radio installation may, instead of the additional MF/HF radio installation, install an Inmarsat SES complying with the requirements of regulation IV/ 10.1.1. The MF/HF radio installation or Inmarsat SES installed for duplication should also comply with regulation V/10.3.2.2 The additional radio installations specified in 2.1.1 and 2.1.2 of these Guidelines should each be connectedto a separate antenna and be installed and ready for immediate operation.2.3 It should be possible to connect the additional radio installations specified in 2.1.1 and 2.1.2 (hereinafterreferred to as duplicated equipment) to the reserve source or sources of energy required by regulation IV/13.2, inaddition to the appropriate radio equipment specified in that regulation (hereinafter referred to as basic equipment).The capacity of the reserve source or sources of energy should be sufficient to operate the particular installation(i.e. the basic equipment or the duplicated equipment) with the highest power consumption, for the appropriateperiod specified in regulation IV/13.2.1 to IV/13.2.3. However, the arrangement for the reserve source or sourcesof energy should be such that a single fault in this arrangement should not be able to affect both the basic and theduplicated equipment.3 SHORE-BASED MAINTENANCE FOR ENSURING AVAILABILITY3.1 If availability is ensured by using a combination of methods which includes shore-based maintenance, anarrangement acceptable to the Administration should be established to ensure adequate support of the ship for themaintenance and repair of its radio installations. For example, the following arrangements, among others, may besuitable: .1 an agreement with a company known to cover the trading area of the ship to provide maintenance and repair facilities on a call-out basis; .2 provision of facilities at the main base of ships engaged on a regular trading pattern. Records of Equipment (Form P, R or C) should include an indication of the types of arrangements for shore- based maintenance.3.2 It should be recognized that, despite the use of other methods, some reliance on shore-based maintenance toensure the availability of the functional requirements of the GMDSS will always be necessary.4 AT-SEA ELECTRONIC MAINTENANCE CAPABILITY FOR ENSURING AVAILABILITY4.1 If availability is ensured by using a combination of methods which includes at-sea electronic maintenancecapability, adequate additional technical documentation, tools, test equipment and spare parts must be carried onboard in order to enable the maintainer to perform tests and localize and repair faults in the radio equipment. Theextent of this additional technical documentation, tools, measuring equipment and spare parts to be carried onboard should be consistent with the equipment installed and should be approved by the Administration. Anindication of such approval should be entered in the Records of Equipment (Form P, R or C).4.2 The person designated to perform functions for at-sea electronic maintenance should either hold an ap-propriate certificate as specified by the Radio Regulations, as required, or have equivalent at-sea electronicmaintenance qualifications, as may be approved by the Administration, taking into account the recommenda-tions* of the Organization on the training of such personnel.* Refer to Assembly resolution A.703(17) concerning training of radio personnel in the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) (seeannex 2-11).
  • Annex 2-11 – Page 1 GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-11 Resolution A.703(17) (Adopted on 6 November 1991) TRAINING OF RADIO PERSONNEL IN THE GLOBAL MARITIME DISTRESS AND SAFETY SYSTEM (GMDSS)THE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,CONSIDERING the 1987 amendments to the Radio Regulations, the 1988 amendments to the InternationalConvention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (SOLAS), and the 1991 amendments to the International Con-vention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978 (STCW), for introductionof the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS),NOTING that the 1991 amendments to regulation IV/2 of the STCW Convention require that, in determiningthe appropriate level of knowledge and training for certification of GMDSS radio personnel, the Administrationshall also take into account the relevant recommendations of the Organization,NOTING ALSO that resolutions 14 and 15 of the International Conference on Training and Certification ofSeafarers, 1978, concerning the training and certification of radio officers and radiotelephone operators do notapply to radio personnel on ships operating in the GMDSS,NOTING FURTHER that resolution A.702(17)* on radio maintenance guidelines for the GMDSS related to seaareas A3 and A4 includes provisions permitting Administrations to approve at-sea electronic maintenance qua-lifications which are equivalent to those recommended for holders of certificates specified by the Radio Reg-ulations,RECOGNIZING the need for developing recommendations on training for radio personnel in ships operating inthe GMDSS,HAVING CONSIDERED the recommendation made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its fifty-ninth session,1. ADOPTS: (a) the Recommendation on Training of Radio Operators related to the First-Class Radioelectronic Certificate, set out in annex 1; (b) the Recommendation on Training of Radio Operators related to the Second-Class Radioelectronic Certificate, set out in annex 2; (c) the Recommendation on Training of Radio Operators related to the General Operator’s Certificate, set out in annex 3; (d) the Recommendation on Training of Radio Operators related to the Restricted Operator’s Certifi- cate, set out in annex 4; and (e) the Recommendation on Training of Personnel Performing Maintenance of the GMDSS Installations Aboard Ships, set out in annex 5;2. RECOMMENDS Governments to take account of the appropriate recommendation set out in the annexes tothe present resolution on the training of radio personnel for ships operating in the GMDSS;* See annex 2-10.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-11 – Page 23. INVITES the Maritime Safety Committee to keep the present resolution under review in consultation orassociation with other international organizations, as appropriate, particularly with the International LabourOrganisation and the International Telecommunication Union, and to bring any future amendments to theattention of all Governments concerned;4. AUTHORIZES the Maritime Safety Committee to keep the annexed recommendations under review and toadopt, when appropriate, amendments thereto. Annex 1 RECOMMENDATION ON TRAINING OF RADIO OPERATORS RELATED TO THE FIRST-CLASS RADIOELECTRONIC CERTIFICATE1 GENERAL1.1 Before training is commenced, the requirements of medical fitness, especially as to hearing, eyesight andspeech, should be met by the candidate.2.1 The training should be relevant to the provisions of the International Convention on Standards of Training,Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), the provisions of the Radio Regulations annexed to theInternational Telecommunication Convention (Radio Regulations) and the provisions of the InternationalConvention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) then in force, with particular attention to provisions for theglobal maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS). In developing training requirements, account should betaken of knowledge of the following items, which is not an exhaustive list.2 THEORY2.1 Knowledge of the general principles and basic factors necessary for safe and efficient use of all the subsystemsand equipment required in the GMDSS sufficient to support the training requirements listed in the practicalsection of this annex.2.2 Knowledge of the use, operation and service areas of the GMDSS subsystems, including satellite systemcharacteristics, navigational and meteorological warning systems and selection of appropriate communicationcircuits.2.3 Knowledge of the principles of electricity and the theory of radio and electronics sufficient to meet therequirements specified in 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 2.7 and 2.8 below.2.4 Theoretical knowledge of GMDSS radiocommunication equipment, including narrow-band direct-print-ing telegraphy and radiotelephone transmitters and receivers, digital selective calling equipment, ship earth sta-tions, emergency position-indicating radio beacons, marine antenna systems, radio equipment for survival crafttogether with all auxiliary items, including power supplies, as well as general knowledge of the principles of otherequipment generally used for radionavigation, with particular reference to maintaining the equipment in service.2.5 Knowledge of factors that affect system reliability, availability, maintenance procedures and proper use oftest equipment.2.6 Knowledge of microprocessors and fault diagnosis in systems using microprocessors.2.7 Knowledge of control systems in the GMDSS radio equipment, including testing and analysis.2.8 Knowledge of the use of computer software for the GMDSS radio equipment and methods for correctingfaults caused by loss of software control of the equipment.
  • Annex 2-11 – Page 3 GMDSS Handbook3 REGULATIONS AND DOCUMENTATIONThe operator should have knowledge of: .1 the SOLAS Convention and the Radio Regulations, with particular emphasis on: .1.1 distress, urgency and safety radiocommunications; .1.2 avoiding harmful interference, particularly with distress and safety traffic; .1.3 prevention of unauthorized transmissions; .2 other documents relating to operational and communication procedures for distress, safety and public correspondence services, including charges, navigational warnings, and weather broadcasts in the maritime mobile service and the maritime mobile satellite service; .3 use of the International Code of Signals and the IMO Standard Marine Navigational Vocabulary.4 WATCHKEEPING AND PROCEDURESTraining should be given in: .1 communication procedures and discipline to prevent harmful interference in the GMDSS subsystems; .2 procedures for using propagation-prediction information to establish optimum frequencies for com- munications; .3 radiocommunications watchkeeping relevant to all GMDSS subsystems, exchange of radio- communications traffic, particularly concerning distress, urgency and safety procedures, and radio records; .4 use of the international phonetic alphabet; .5 monitoring a distress frequency while simultaneously monitoring or working on at least one other frequency; .6 ship position-reporting systems and procedures; .7 communication procedures of the IMO Merchant Ship Search and Rescue Manual (MERSAR), using radiocommunications; .8 radio medical systems and procedures.5 PRACTICALPractical training, supported by appropriate laboratory work, should be given in: .1 correct and efficient operation of all GMDSS subsystems and equipment under normal propagation conditions and under typical interference conditions; .2 safe operation of all the GMDSS communication equipment and ancillary devices, including safety precautions; .3 adequate and accurate keyboard skill for the satisfactory exchange of communications; .4 operational techniques for: .4.1 receiver and transmitter adjustment for the appropriate mode of operation, including digital se- lective calling and direct-printing telegraphy; .4.2 antenna adjustment and re-alignment, as appropriate; .4.3 use of radio life-saving appliances; .4.4 use of emergency position-indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs); .5 antenna rigging, repair and maintenance, as appropriate; .6 reading and understanding of pictorial, logic and circuit diagrams;
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-11 – Page 4 .7 use and care of those tools and test instruments necessary to carry out at-sea electronic maintenance; .8 manual soldering and desoldering techniques, including those involving semiconductor devices and modern circuits and the ability to distinguish whether the circuit is suitable to be manually soldered or desoldered; .9 tracing and repair of faults to component level where practicable, and to board/module level in other cases; .10 recognition and correction of conditions contributing to the fault occurring; .11 maintenance procedures, both preventive and corrective, for all the GMDSS communication equipment and radionavigation equipment; .12 methods of alleviating electrical and electromagnetic interference such as bonding, shielding and bypassing.6 MISCELLANEOUSThe operator should have knowledge of, and/or receive training in: .1 the English language, both written and spoken, for the satisfactory exchange of communications relevant to the safety of life at sea; .2 world geography, especially the principal shipping routes, services of rescue co-ordination centres (RCCs) and related communication routes; .3 survival at sea, the operation of lifeboats, rescue boats, liferafts, buoyant apparatus and their equipment, with special reference to radio life-saving appliances; .4 fire prevention and fire fighting, with particular reference to the radio installation; .5 preventive measures for the safety of ship and personnel in connection with hazards related to radio equipment, including electrical, radiation, chemical and mechanical hazards; .6 first aid, including heart-respiration revival technique; .7 co-ordinated universal time (UTC), global time zones and international date-line. Annex 2 RECOMMENDATION ON TRAINING OF RADIO OPERATORS RELATED TO THE SECOND-CLASS RADIOELECTRONIC CERTIFICATE1 GENERAL1.1 Before training is commenced, the requirements of medical fitness, especially as to hearing, eyesight andspeech, should be met by the candidate.1.2 The training should be relevant to the provisions of the International Convention on Standards of Training,Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), the provisions of the Radio Regulations annexed to theInternational Telecommunication Convention (Radio Regulations) and the provisions of the InternationalConvention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) then in force, with particular attention to provisions for theglobal maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS). In developing training requirements, account should betaken of knowledge of the following items, which is not an exhaustive list.2 THEORY2.1 Knowledge of the general principles and basic factors necessary for safe and efficient use of all the subsystemsand equipment required in the GMDSS sufficient to support the training requirements listed in the practicalsection of this annex.
  • Annex 2-11 – Page 5 GMDSS Handbook2.2 Knowledge of the use, operation and service areas of the GMDSS subsystems, including satellite systemcharacteristics, navigational and meteorological warning systems and selection of appropriate communicationcircuits.2.3 Knowledge of the principles of electricity and the theory of radio and electronics sufficient to meet therequirements specified in 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 2.7 and 2.8 below.2.4 General theoretical knowledge of GMDSS radiocommunication equipment, including narrow-band direct-printing telegraph and radiotelephone transmitters and receivers, digital selective calling equipment, ship earthstations, emergency position-indicating radio beacons, marine antenna systems, radio equipment for survival crafttogether with all auxiliary items, including power supplies, as well as general knowledge of other equipmentgenerally used for radionavigation, with particular reference to maintaining the equipment in service.2.5 General knowledge of factors that affect system reliability, availability, maintenance procedures and properuse of test equipment.2.6 General knowledge of microprocessors and fault diagnosis in systems using microprocessors.2.7 General knowledge of control systems in the GMDSS radio equipment, including testing and analysis.2.8 Knowledge of the use of computer software for the GMDSS radio equipment and methods for correctingfaults caused by loss of software control of the equipment.3 REGULATIONS AND DOCUMENTATIONThe operator should have knowledge of: .1 the SOLAS Convention and the Radio Regulations, with particular emphasis on: .1.1 distress, urgency and safety radiocommunications; .1.2 avoiding harmful interference, particularly with distress and safety traffic; .1.3 prevention of unauthorized transmissions; .2 other documents relating to operational and communication procedures for distress, safety and public correspondence services, including charges, navigational warnings, and weather broadcasts in the maritime mobile service and the maritime mobile satellite service; .3 use of the International Code of Signals and the IMO Standard Marine Navigational Vocabulary.4 WATCHKEEPING AND PROCEDURESTraining should be given in: .1 communication procedures and discipline to prevent harmful interference in the GMDSS subsystems; .2 procedures for using propagation-prediction information to establish optimum frequencies for com- munications; .3 radiocommunications watchkeeping relevant to all GMDSS subsystems, exchange of radio- communications traffic, particularly concerning distress, urgency and safety procedures, and radio records; .4 use of the international phonetic alphabet; .5 monitoring a distress frequency while simultaneously monitoring or working on at least one other frequency; .6 ship position-reporting systems and procedures; .7 communication procedures of the IMO Merchant Ship Search and Rescue Manual (MERSAR), using radiocommunications; .8 radio medical systems and procedures.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-11 – Page 65 PRACTICALPractical training, supported by appropriate laboratory work, should be given in: .1 correct and efficient operation of all GMDSS subsystems and equipment under normal propagation conditions and under typical interference conditions; .2 safe operation of all the GMDSS communication equipment and ancillary devices, including safety precautions; .3 adequate and accurate keyboard skill for the satisfactory exchange of communications; .4 operational techniques for: .4.1 receiver and transmitter adjustment for the appropriate mode of operation, including digital se- lective calling and direct-printing telegraphy; .4.2 antenna adjustment and re-alignment, as appropriate; .4.3 use of radio life-saving appliances; .4.4 use of emergency position-indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs); .5 antenna rigging, repair and maintenance, as appropriate; .6 reading and understanding of pictorial, logic and module interconnection diagrams; .7 use and care of those tools and test instruments necessary to carry out at-sea electronic maintenance at the level of unit or module replacement; .8 basic manual soldering and desoldering techniques and their limitations; .9 tracing and repair of faults to board/module level; .10 recognition and correction of conditions contributing to the fault occurring; .11 basic maintenance procedures, both preventive and corrective, for all the GMDSS communication equipment and radionavigation equipment; .12 methods of alleviating electrical and electromagnetic interference such as bonding, shielding and bypassing.6 MISCELLANEOUSThe operator should have knowledge of, and/or receive training in: .1 the English language, both written and spoken, for the satisfactory exchange of communications relevant to the safety of life at sea; .2 world geography, especially the principal shipping routes, services of rescue co-ordination centres (RCCs) and related communication routes; .3 survival at sea, the operation of lifeboats, rescue boats, liferafts, buoyant apparatus and their equipment, with special reference to radio life-saving appliances; .4 fire prevention and fire fighting, with particular reference to the radio installation; .5 preventive measures for the safety of ship and personnel in connection with hazards related to radio equipment, including electrical, radiation, chemical and mechanical hazards; .6 first aid, including heart-respiration revival technique; .7 co-ordinated universal time (UTC), global time zones and international date-line.
  • Annex 2-11 – Page 7 GMDSS Handbook Annex 3 RECOMMENDATION ON TRAINING OF RADIO OPERATORS RELATED TO THE GENERAL OPERATOR’S CERTIFICATE1 GENERAL1.1 Before training is commenced, the requirements of medical fitness, especially as to hearing, eyesight andspeech, should be met by the candidate.1.2 The training should be relevant to the provisions of the International Convention on Standards of Training,Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), the provisions of the Radio Regulations annexed to theInternational Telecommunication Convention (Radio Regulations) and the provisions of the InternationalConvention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) then in force, with particular attention to provisions for theglobal maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS). In developing training requirements, account should betaken of knowledge of the following items, which is not an exhaustive list.2 THEORY2.1 Knowledge of the general principles and basic factors necessary for safe and efficient use of all the subsystemsand equipment required in the GMDSS sufficient to support the training requirements listed in the practicalsection of this annex.2.2 Knowledge of the use, operation and service areas of the GMDSS subsystems, including satellite systemcharacteristics, navigational and meteorological warning systems and selection of appropriate communicationcircuits.3 REGULATIONS AND DOCUMENTATIONThe operator should have knowledge of: .1 the SOLAS Convention and the Radio Regulations, with particular emphasis on: .1.1 distress, urgency and safety radiocommunications; .1.2 avoiding harmful interference, particularly with distress and safety traffic; .1.3 prevention of unauthorized transmissions; .2 other documents relating to operational and communication procedures for distress, safety and public correspondence services, including charges, navigational warnings, and weather broadcasts in the maritime mobile service and the maritime mobile-satellite service; .3 use of the International Code of Signals and the IMO Standard Marine Navigational Vocabulary.4 WATCHKEEPING AND PROCEDURESTraining should be given in: .1 communication procedures and discipline to prevent harmful interference in the GMDSS subsystems; .2 procedures for using propagation-prediction information to establish optimum frequencies for com- munications; .3 radiocommunications watchkeeping relevant to all GMDSS subsystems, exchange of radio- communications traffic, particularly concerning distress, urgency and safety procedures, and radio records; .4 use of the international phonetic alphabet; .5 monitoring a distress frequency while simultaneously monitoring or working on at least one other frequency; .6 ship position-reporting systems and procedures;
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-11 – Page 8 .7 communication procedures of the IMO Merchant Ship Search and Rescue Manual (MERSAR), using radiocommunications; .8 radio medical systems and procedures.5 PRACTICALPractical training should be given in: .1 correct and efficient operation of all GMDSS subsystems and equipment under normal propagation conditions and under typical interference conditions; .2 safe operation of all the GMDSS communications equipment and ancillary devices, including safety precautions; .3 accurate and adequate keyboard skills for the satisfactory exchange of communications; .4 operational techniques for: .4.1 receiver and transmitter adjustment for the appropriate mode of operation, including digital se- lective calling and direct-printing telegraphy; .4.2 antenna adjustment and re-alignment as appropriate; .4.3 use of radio life-saving appliances; .4.4 use of emergency position-indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs).6 MISCELLANEOUSThe operator should have knowledge of, and/or receive training in: .1 the English language, both written and spoken, for the satisfactory exchange of communications relevant to the safety of life at sea; .2 world geography, especially the principal shipping routes, services of rescue co-ordination centres (RCCs) and related communication routes; .3 survival at sea, the operation of lifeboats, rescue boats, liferafts, buoyant apparatus and their equipment, with special reference to radio life-saving appliances; .4 fire prevention and fire fighting, with particular reference to the radio installation; .5 preventive measures for the safety of ship and personnel in connection with hazards related to radio equipment, including electrical, radiation, chemical and mechanical hazards; .6 first aid, including heart-respiration revival technique; .7 co-ordinated universal time (UTC), global time zones and international date-line. Annex 4 RECOMMENDATION ON TRAINING OF RADIO OPERATORS RELATED TO THE RESTRICTED OPERATOR’S CERTIFICATE1 GENERAL1.1 Before training is commenced, the requirements of medical fitness, especially as to hearing, eyesight andspeech, should be met by the candidate.1.2 The training should be relevant to the provisions of the International Convention on Standards of Training,Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), the provisions of the Radio Regulations annexed to theInternational Telecommunication Convention (Radio Regulations) and the provisions of the International
  • Annex 2-11 – Page 9 GMDSS HandbookConvention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) then in force, with particular attention to provisions for theglobal maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS). In developing training requirements, account should betaken of knowledge of the following items, which is not an exhaustive list.2 THEORY2.1 Knowledge of the general principles and basic factors, including VHF range limitation and antenna heighteffect necessary for safe and efficient use of all the subsystems and equipment required in the GMDSS in sea areaA1, sufficient to support the training requirements listed in the practical section of this annex.2.2 Knowledge of the use, operation and service areas of the GMDSS sea area A1 subsystems, e.g. navigationaland meteorological warning systems and the appropriate communication circuits.3 REGULATIONS AND DOCUMENTATIONThe operator should have knowledge of: .1 those parts of the SOLAS Convention and the Radio Regulations relevant to sea area A1, with particular emphasis on: .1.1 distress, urgency and safety radiocommunications; .1.2 avoiding harmful interference, particularly with distress and safety traffic; .1.3 prevention of unauthorized transmissions; .2 other documents relating to operational and communication procedures for distress, safety and public correspondence services, including charges, navigational warnings and weather broadcasts in the maritime mobile service in sea area A1; .3 use of the International Code of Signals and the IMO Standard Marine Navigational Vocabulary.4 WATCHKEEPING AND PROCEDURESTraining should be given in: .1 communication procedures and discipline to prevent harmful interference in the GMDSS subsystems used in sea area A1; .2 VHF communication procedures for: .2.1 radiocommunications watchkeeping, exchange of radiocommunications traffic, particularly con- cerning distress, urgency and safety procedures, and radio records; .2.2 monitoring a distress frequency while simultaneously monitoring or working on at least one other frequency; .2.3 digital selective calling system; .3 use of the international phonetic alphabet; .4 ship position-reporting systems and procedures; .5 communication procedures of the IMO Merchant Ship Search and Rescue Manual (MERSAR) using VHF radiocommunications; .6 radio medical systems and procedures.5 PRACTICALPractical training should be given in: .1 correct and efficient operation of the GMDSS subsystems and equipment prescribed for ships oper- ating in sea area A1 under normal propagation conditions and under typical interference conditions;
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-11 – Page 10 .2 safe operation of the relevant GMDSS communication equipment and ancillary devices, including safety precautions; .3 operational techniques for: .3.1 use of VHF, including channel, squelch, and mode adjustment, as appropriate; .3.2 use of radio life-saving appliances; .3.3 use of emergency position-indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs); .3.4 use of NAVTEX receiver.6 MISCELLANEOUSThe operator should have knowledge of, and/or receive training in: .1 the English language, both written and spoken, for the satisfactory exchange of communications relevant to the safety of life at sea; .2 services of rescue co-ordination centres (RCCs) and related communication routes; .3 survival at sea, the operation of lifeboats, rescue boats, liferafts, buoyant apparatus and their equipment, with special reference to radio life-saving appliances; .4 fire prevention and fire fighting, with particular reference to the radio installation; .5 preventive measures for the safety of ship and personnel in connection with hazards related to radio equipment, including electrical, radiation, chemical and mechanical hazards; .6 first aid, including heart-respiration revival technique. Annex 5 RECOMMENDATION ON TRAINING OF PERSONNEL PERFORMING MAINTENANCE OF THE GMDSS INSTALLATIONS ABOARD SHIPS1 GENERAL1.1 Reference is made to regulation IV/15, Maintenance requirements, as contained in the 1988 amendments tothe 1974 SOLAS Convention concerning radiocommunications for the GMDSS, and to resolution A.702(17) onradio maintenance guidelines for the GMDSS related to sea areas A3 and A4, which includes in its annex thefollowing provision: ‘‘4.2 The person designated to perform functions for at-sea electronic maintenance should either hold an appropriate certificate as specified by the Radio Regulations, as required, or have equivalent at-sea electronic maintenance qualifications, as may be approved by the Administration, taking into account the re- commendations of the Organization on the training of such personnel.’’1.2 The following guidance on equivalent electronic maintenance qualifications is provided for use by Ad-ministrations as appropriate.1.3 Training as recommended below does not qualify the person to be an operator of GMDSS radio equipment,unless he holds an appropriate radio operator’s certificate.2 MAINTENANCE TRAINING EQUIVALENT TO THE FIRST-CLASS RADIOELECTRONIC CERTIFICATE2.1 In determining training equivalent to the maintenance elements of the first-class radioelectronic certificate,knowledge of the items referred to in the following paragraphs, contained in annex 1 to the present resolution,should be taken into account, but the list should not be considered exhaustive.
  • Annex 2-11 – Page 11 GMDSS Handbook2.2 Theory 2.1, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 2.7 and 2.8.2.3 Practical 5.2, 5.4.1, 5.4.2, 5.4.3, 5.4.4, 5.5, 5.6, 5.7, 5.8, 5.9, 5.10, 5.11 and 5.12.2.4 Miscellaneous 6.4, 6.5 and 6.6.3 MAINTENANCE TRAINING EQUIVALENT TO THE SECOND-CLASS RADIOELECTRONIC CERTIFICATE3.1 In determining training equivalent to the maintenance elements of the second-class radioelectronic certi-ficate, knowledge of the items referred to in the following paragraphs, contained in annex 2 to the presentresolution, should be taken into account, but the list should not be considered exhaustive.3.2 Theory 2.1, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 2.7 and 2.8.3.3 Practical 5.2, 5.4.1, 5.4.2, 5.4.3, 5.4.4, 5.5, 5.6, 5.7, 5.8, 5.9, 5.10, 5.11 and 5.12.3.4 Miscellaneous 6.4, 6.5 and 6.6.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-12 – Page 1 Annex 2-12 Resolution A.705(17) (Adopted on 6 November 1991) PROMULGATION OF MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATIONThe ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,RECALLING ALSO regulation V/2 of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (SOLAS),which establishes the requirement for promulgating information on direct dangers to navigation,NOTING resolution A.706(17)* on the World-Wide Navigational Warning Service,RECALLING FURTHER regulation V/4 of the 1974 SOLAS Convention which establishes the requirement forpromulgating maritime meteorological information,BEARING IN MIND the 1988 amendments to the 1974 SOLAS Convention concerning radiocommunicationsfor the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS),BEARING IN MIND ALSO the work of the Organization in developing co-ordinated world-wide search andrescue facilities,NOTING ADDITIONALLY that the Organization has adopted carriage requirements and performance standardsfor specialized systems for receiving maritime safety information on ships subject to the 1974 SOLAS Con-vention, as amended,NOTING ALSO that some of the present means of transmitting maritime safety information will no longer beeffective under the GMDSS,NOTING FURTHER that Governments may, at their discretion, implement and operate other additional means ofpromulgation of maritime safety information to meet national requirements,RECOGNIZING that international co-operation and co-ordination are essential for the satisfactory maintenance ofmaritime safety information services and that such services make a vital contribution to the safety of life at sea,HAVING CONSIDERED the recommendation made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its fifty-ninth session,1. RESOLVES that the procedures for the provision and promulgation of maritime safety information should bein accordance with the Recommendation on Promulgation of Maritime Safety Information set out in the annexto the present resolution;2. URGES Governments to co-operate in providing maritime safety information in accordance with thestructure established by the said Recommendation.* See annex 2-15.
  • Annex 2-12 – Page 2 GMDSS Handbook Annex RECOMMENDATION ON PROMULGATION OF MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION1 INTRODUCTION1.1 The maritime safety information service is an internationally co-ordinated network of radio broadcastscontaining information which is necessary for safe navigation, received in all ships by equipment which auto-matically* monitors the appropriate frequencies and prints out in simple English only that information which isrelevant to the ship. This concept is illustrated in figure 1.1.2 Maritime safety information (MSI) is of vital concern to all vessels. It is therefore essential that commonstandards are applied to the collection, editing and dissemination of this information. Only by doing so will themariner be assured of receiving the information he needs, in a form which he understands, at the earliest possibletime.Shore organization NAV WARNINGS MET INFORMATION SAR ALERTS MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION (co-ordination/editing function) AREA BROADCASTS Region A Region B Region C Region D Local Local Local Local NAVTEX Tx NAVTEX Tx CES CESBroadcast services 518 kHz INMARSAT NETWORK C0-ORDINATION STATION (NCS) OCEAN REGION SATELLITEShipboard equipment NAVTEX RECEIVER EGC SafetyNET receiving facility Figure 1 – The international maritime safety information serviceNote: HF NBDP systems may be used to provide an additional supplementary equivalent service to EGC SafetyNET.* The Organization has decided that manual operation will be acceptable for receiving broadcasts of MSI via the operational HF NBDP system(where available) until the full implementation of the GMDSS on 1 February 1999.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-12 – Page 31.3 The purpose of this Recommendation is to set out the organization, standards and methods which shouldbe used for the promulgation and reception of maritime safety information.2 DEFINITIONS2.1 For the purposes of this Recommendation, the following definitions apply: .1 Maritime safety information (MSI) means navigational and meteorological warnings, meteorological forecasts and other urgent safety-related messages. .2 Maritime safety information service means the co-ordinated service of navigational and meteorological warnings, meteorological forecasts and distress alerts. .3 World-wide navigational warning service (WWNWS) means the internationally co-ordinated service for the promulgation of navigational warnings as set out in resolution A.706(17). .4 Meteorological information means the marine meteorological warning and forecast information described in regulation V/4(b)(i) and (ii) of the 1974 SOLAS Convention. .5 Distress alert means the initial shore-to-ship distress message broadcast in accordance with the Radio Regulations. .6 NAVTEX means the system for the broadcast and automatic reception of maritime safety information by means of narrow-band direct-printing telegraphy. .7 International NAVTEX service means the co-ordinated broadcast and automatic reception on 518 kHz of maritime safety information by means of narrow-band direct-printing telegraphy using the English language, as set out in the NAVTEX Manual, published by IMO. .8 National NAVTEX service means the broadcast and automatic reception of maritime safety information by means of narrow-band direct-printing telegraphy using frequencies and languages as decided by the Administrations concerned. .9 International SafetyNET service means the area-addressable global broadcast system, provided by In- marsat, through the geostationary maritime communications satellite network for promulgation of maritime safety information.3 BROADCAST SERVICES3.1 Two systems are used for broadcasting maritime safety information. They are provided specifically to servethe requirements of chapter V of the 1974 SOLAS Convention in the areas covered by these systems, as follows: .1 the International NAVTEX service transmissions in coastal regions; and .2 the international SafetyNET service transmissions which cover all the waters of the globe, except for polar regions.3.2 Information should be provided for unique and precisely defined sea areas, each being served only by themost appropriate of the above systems. Although there will be some duplication to allow a vessel to change fromone system to another, the majority of messages will only be broadcast on one system.3.3 NAVTEX transmissions should be made in accordance with the standards and procedures set out in theNAVTEX Manual. These transmissions are subject to approval by the Maritime Safety Committee. The meansof obtaining this approval is described in the NAVTEX Manual.3.4 International SafetyNET service transmissions should be made in accordance with the standards and pro-cedures set out in the International SafetyNET Manual.*3.5 Member Governments may also choose to provide supplementary equivalent broadcasts of maritime safetyinformation in other modes using other frequencies. These may include national NAVTEX services on4,209.5 kHz and 490 kHz and HF NBDP broadcasts.* Refer to annex 4-3.
  • Annex 2-12 – Page 4 GMDSS Handbook4 RECEPTION FACILITIES4.1 Ships are required to be capable of receiving maritime safety information broadcasts for the area in whichthey operate. This requirement is set out in chapter IV of the 1974 SOLAS Convention, as amended.4.2 The international SafetyNET service receiving facility should conform to part A of the Inmarsat design andinstallation guidelines for the EGC SafetyNET equipment and should meet the performance standards adopted bythe Organization by resolution A.664(16).*4.3 The NAVTEX receiver should operate in accordance with the technical specifications set out in CCIRRecommendation 540{, as amended, and should meet the performance standards adopted by the Organization byresolution A.525(13).{5 PROVISION OF INFORMATION5.1 Navigational warnings should be provided in accordance with the standards, organization and procedures ofthe WWNWS under the functional guidance of the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) through itsCommission on Promulgation of Radio Navigational Warnings.5.2 Meteorological information should be provided in accordance with the technical regulations and re-commendations of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).5.3 Distress alerts should be provided by the various authorities responsible for co-ordinating maritime searchand rescue operations in accordance with the standards and procedures established by the Organization.6 CO-ORDINATION PROCEDURES6.1 In order to make the best use of automated reception facilities and to ensure that the mariner receives theminimum information necessary for safe navigation, careful co-ordination is required.6.2 In general, this requirement for co-operation and co-ordination will be met by the standard operationalprocedures of IHO, WMO, International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and Inmarsat.6.3 Cases of difficulty should be referred, in the first instance, to the most appropriate parent body.6.4 Member States wishing to provide maritime safety information services should nominate a national co-ordinator for each type of information concerned, informing the Organization of such nominations as they aremade. The Organization will maintain and, through the Maritime Safety Committee, publish a list of thenominated co-ordinators.6.5 The establishment of transmissions in the international NAVTEX service is co-ordinated by the MaritimeSafety Committee. Detailed guidance on the provision of NAVTEX services is contained in the NAVTEXManual.6.6 The use of satellite maritime safety information services is co-ordinated by the Maritime Safety Committee.6.7 The designation of service areas is an important part of the co-ordination process since it is intended that avessel should be able to obtain all the information relevant to a given area from a single source. Information co-ordinators should, therefore, design their broadcasts to suit a particular service area. The Maritime SafetyCommittee will designate service areas for the international SafetyNET service and the International NAVTEXservice. In doing so, the Committee will take full account of the character and volume of information and thepattern of maritime traffic in the region and the advice of IHO and WMO.* See annex 3-5-2.{ See annex 3-5-5.{ See annex 3-5-1.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-12 – Page 57 SYSTEM MANAGEMENT7.1 Proposals for amendment or enhancement of maritime safety information services should be submitted tothe Maritime Safety Committee for evaluation.7.2 The agreement of IHO, WMO and ITU, as appropriate, and the active participation of other bodies shouldbe sought, according to the nature of the proposed amendments.7.3 The active participation of IHO, WMO, ITU and Inmarsat is considered necessary for the co-ordination ofbroadcasts of all maritime safety information.7.4 Amendments adopted by the Maritime Safety Committee will be notified to all concerned, will provide atleast 12 months’ notification and will come into force on 1 January of the following year.
  • Annex 2-13 – Page 1 GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-13 Resolution A.706(17) (Adopted on 6 November 1991) WORLD-WIDE NAVIGATIONAL WARNING SERVICETHE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,BEARING IN MIND the decisions of the XIth International Hydrographic Conference,NOTING that the world-wide navigational warning service, adopted by resolution A.419(XI), has successfullybeen in existence since 1979,NOTING FURTHER the provisions made for the promulgation of maritime safety information by the 1988amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, concerning radio-communications for the global maritime distress and safety system,HAVING CONSIDERED the recommendations made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its fifty-ninth session,1. ADOPTS the IMO/IHO World-Wide Navigational Warning Service – Guidance Document, as set out inannex 1 to the present resolution;2. RECOMMENDS Governments to implement the world-wide navigational warning service;3. AUTHORIZES the Maritime Safety Committee to amend the world-wide navigational warning service, asmay be necessary, in accordance with the procedure set out in annex 2 to the present resolution;4. REVOKES resolution A.419(XI). Annex 1 IMO/IHO WORLD-WIDE NAVIGATIONAL WARNING SERVICE GUIDANCE DOCUMENT[Text is contained in annex 4-1 of this publication*]. Annex 2 IMO PROCEDURE FOR AMENDING THE WORLD-WIDE NAVIGATIONAL WARNING SERVICE1 Proposed amendments to the world-wide navigational warning service should be submitted to the MaritimeSafety Committee for evaluation.* Contains the amendments adopted by the Maritime Safety Committee at its sixty-fifth session (9 to 17 May 1995), which entered into force on1 January 1997 (see MSC/Circ.685), and the amendments adopted at its sixty-sixth session (28 May to 6 June 1996), which entered into force on1 January 1998 (see MSC/Circ.750).
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-13 – Page 22 Amendments to the service should normally come into force at intervals of approximately two years or atsuch longer periods as determined by the Maritime Safety Committee at the time of adoption. Amendmentsadopted by the Maritime Safety Committee will be notified to all concerned, will provide at least 12 months’notification and will come into force on 1 January of the following year.3 The agreement of the International Hydrographic Organization and the active participation of other bodiesshould be sought according to the nature of the proposed amendments.4 When the proposals for amendment have been examined in substance, the Maritime Safety Committee willentrust the Sub-Committee on Radiocommunications with the ensuing editorial tasks.5 The NAVAREA schedule of broadcast times and frequencies, not being an integral part of the service andbeing subject to frequent changes, will not be subject to the amendment procedures.
  • Annex 2-14 – Page 1 GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-14 Resolution A.707(17) (Adopted on 6 November 1991) CHARGES FOR DISTRESS, URGENCY AND SAFETY MESSAGES THROUGH THE INMARSAT SYSTEMTHE ASSEMBLYRECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,RECALLING ALSO resolution 2 adopted by the International Conference on Maritime Search and Rescue, 1979,which recommends that States should arrange that participation in ship reporting systems shall be free of messagecost to the ships concerned,RECALLING FURTHER resolution 6 adopted by the 1988 Conference of Contracting Governments to SOLAS1974 on the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) which requests the Maritime Safety Committeeto review funding arrangements prior to the implementation date of the GMDSS,BEARING IN MIND that the existing terrestrial maritime radiocommunication services for distress, urgency andsafety messages are free of charge to shipping,NOTING that Inmarsat accounts with its coast earth station operators for all communications other than the initialdistress call and message,NOTING ALSO that the Joint IMO/Inmarsat Meeting on Funding for Maritime Distress and Safety Commu-nications (4–7 December 1990) made further recommendations regarding the treatment of Inmarsat space seg-ment charges as shown in the service/charging matrix for distress and safety communications through theInmarsat system, set out in the annex to the present resolution, as well as, review arrangements,NOTING FURTHER that the thirty-eighth session of the Inmarsat Council had agreed to the recommendations ofthe Director-General of Inmarsat regarding the treatment of maritime distress and safety communications whichwere based on the service/charging matrix set out in the annex to the present resolution,FURTHER NOTING that the charges to ships and land subscribers for communication services provided via theInmarsat system are established by national telecommunication entities in conformity with national policies andpractices,RECOGNIZING the advantages of the Inmarsat service for distress, urgency and safety purposes,RECOGNIZING FURTHER that funding arrangements remain to be agreed at national level for coast earthstations and land-line charges related to the traffic covered by the recommendations of the Joint IMO/InmarsatMeeting,HAVING CONSIDERED the recommendation made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its fifty-ninth session,1. RECOMMENDS that States having coast earth stations under their jurisdiction arrange that the followingtransmissions through the Inmarsat system shall be free of charge: . ship-to-shore and shore-to-ship distress traffic; . urgent ship-to-shore navigational and meteorological danger reports using record communications; and . medical assistance for persons in grave and imminent danger;
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-14 – Page 22. RECOMMENDS ALSO that States make every effort, consistent with domestic laws and policies, to arrangethat meteorological reports, ship position reports and medical advice and assistance messages other than thosereferred to in paragraph 1, transmitted through the Inmarsat system, shall be free of charge to shipping;3. RECOMMENDS FURTHER that States should put suitable arrangements in place for the treatment of coastearth station and land-line charges prior to the entry into force of the 1988 SOLAS amendments to introduce theGMDSS on 1 February 1992;4. REVOKES resolution A.523(13).
  • Annex 2-14 – Page 3 Annex SERVICE/CHARGING MATRIX FOR DISTRESS AND SAFETY COMMUNICATIONS THROUGH THE INMARSAT SYSTEM Recommendations of joint IMO/Inmarsat Meeting Current coast earth station Service Inmarsat Council decision1 Charge to Charge to Space segment 2 (CES) practice7 originator?1 addressee?1Ship-to-shore(a) Distress alerts No No No charge No space segment charge No CES charges 10(b) SAR co-ordination (in- No No No charge for voice or record calls Reduced Inmarsat-A space segment One CES makes no charge to ships cluding communications to associated RCCs via Code 394 charge for calls to associated RCCs.3 via Code 39 as these costs are funded subsequent to initial dis- Calls to other RCCs are charged at by governments. All other CESs tress alerts) the standard space segment rate. charge at the standard rate.(c) Meteorological reports No3 Yes Standard Inmarsat-A, Inmarsat-C, or Currently charged at the standard Several CESs make no charge to Inmarsat-C short data report charge space segment rate. ships via Code 41 as these costs are funded by governments. Other CESs charge at the standard rate. Some CESs have announced end-user charges of around US$0.10 for Inmarsat-C short data reports.9(d) Urgent navigational/ No3 No No charge via record10 communi- Reduced Inmarsat-A space segment Two CESs make no charge to ships meteorological danger cations using Code 42 charge via telex/teletype record as these costs are funded by govern- reports comms using Code 42.8 Other ments. Other CESs charge at the reports charged at the applicable standard rate. standard space segment rate.(e) Ship reports No3 Yes Standard Inmarsat-A, Inmarsat-C or Currently charged at the standard Several CESs accept position reports Inmarsat-C short data report charge space segment rate. at no charge to ships via Code 43 as these costs are funded by govern- ments. Other CESs charge at the standard rate. Some CESs have an- nounced end-user charges of around US$0.10 for Inmarsat-C short data reports.9 GMDSS Handbook(f) Medical advice No5 Yes Special Inmarsat-A and Inmarsat-C Currently charged at the standard Several CESs make no charge to charges via Code 32. Other requests space segment rate. ships via Code 32 as these costs are for medical advice at standard charges funded by governments. Other CESs levied on the originator or the charge at the standard rate. addressee, as may be decided by the Administration.
  • GMDSS Handbook GMDSS Handbook Recommendations of joint IMO/Inmarsat Meeting Current coast earth station Service Inmarsat Council decision1 Charge to Charge to Space segment 2 (CES) practice7 originator?1 addressee?1Ship-to-shore (continued)(g) Medical assistance for No No No charge via Code 38 to an agency Currently charged at the standard Several CESs make no charge to grave and imminent recognized by Administrations. space segment rate ships via Code 38 as these costs are danger Other requests for medical assistance funded by governments. Other CESs at standard charges levied on the charge at the standard rate. originator or the addressee, as may be decided by the AdministrationShore-to-ship(a) Distress alerts No No No charge No space segment charge8 Not known(b) SAR co-ordination No No No charge for voice or record com- Reduced space segment charge for Not known(including communications munications from associated RCCs calls from associated RCCs8subsequent to initial distress to ships and when relating to thealerts) immediate assistance required by a ship in distress and in grave and imminent danger(c) Meteorological forecast Yes — Standard6 SafetyNETTM charge SafetyNETTM space segment charge Several CESs have indicated end- user charges in the vicinity of US$0.50 per kbit(d) Meteorological warnings Yes — Standard6 SafetyNETTM charge SafetyNETTM space segment charge Several CESs have indicated end- user charges in the vicinity of US$0.50 per kbit(e) Navigational warnings Yes — Standard6 SafetyNETTM charge SafetyNETTM space segment charge Several CESs have indicated end- user charges in the vicinity of US$0.50 per kbit(f) Other urgent messages Yes — Standard6 SafetyNETTM charge SafetyNETTM space segment charge Several CESs have indicated end- user charges in the vicinity of Annex 2-14 – Page 4 Annex 2-14 – Page 4 US$0.50 per kbit(g) Medical advice Yes No Standard(h) Medical assistance No No No charge for calls from agencies recognized by Administrations
  • Annex 2-14 – Page 5Notes 1 Space segment and coast earth station elements only; excludes land-line charges. 2 See definitions of charges. 3 No charge to originator if sent via record communications. 4 In the unlikely event of difficulty in securing a connection, ships may use priority 3 at no charge. 5 Only to recognized medical authorities. 6 Via SafetyNETTM. 7 Subject to confirmation by individual CES owners. 8 Not yet implemented. 9 Inmarsat-C short data reports consist of up to 32 bytes of binary encoded user information. Data formats have been developed for meteorological and ship position reports.10 Record is defined as all types of Inmarsat communications other than those via voice channels. Definitions (space segment only)Inmarsat two-digit codes for safety servicesAbbreviated dialling codes have been established in the Inmarsat system, for use by CESs No charge No charges are levied by Inmarsat.which desire to use them, to enable automatic routeing of specific types of calls from ships to Inmarsat will absorb the costs.the appropriate addresses. The following two-digit codes pertain to safety services: Standard charge Standard space segment utilization charges for 32 – Request for medical advice the particular Inmarsat service which are levied by Inmarsat on coast earth station operators. 38 – Request for medical assistance Special charge Special space segment utilization charges levied by 39 – Request for maritime assistance Inmarsat on coast earth station operators and at 41 – Shipment of meteorological data a lower tariff than standard charges. 42 – Shipment of meteorological data and navigational dangers 43 – Ship report GMDSS Handbook
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-15 – Page 1 Annex 2-15 Resolution A.769(18) (Adopted on 4 November 1993) PROCEDURES AND ARRANGEMENTS FOR ISSUING GMDSS CERTIFICATES TO HOLDERS OF NON-GMDSS CERTIFICATESTHE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,CONSIDERING the relevant provisions of the Radio Regulations, the 1988 amendments to the InternationalConvention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (SOLAS), and the 1991 amendments to the International Con-vention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978 (STCW), for the in-troduction of the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS),NOTING that the 1991 amendments to STCW regulation IV/2 require that, in determining the appropriate levelof knowledge and training for certification of GMDSS radio personnel, the Administration shall also take intoaccount the relevant recommendations of the Organization,NOTING ALSO that resolution A.703(17) on training of radio personnel differs substantially from resolutions 14and 15 of the International Conference on Training and Certification of Seafarers, 1978, concerning the trainingand certification of radio officers and radiotelephone operators,BEING OF THE OPINION that issuing of GMDSS certificates to holders of old (non-GMDSS) certificateswithout any requirement for passing an examination is not acceptable,HAVING CONSIDERED the recommendation made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its sixty-secondsession,1. ADOPTS the Procedures and Arrangements for Issuing GMDSS Certificates to Holders of non-GMDSSCertificates, set out in the annex to the present resolution;2. RECOMMENDS Governments, before issuing a GMDSS certificate to a holder of a non-GMDSS certificate,to require the candidate for the certificate to pass a limited examination in accordance with the relevant provisionsof the Radio Regulations and the Procedures and Arrangements set out in the annex to the present resolution;3. RECOMMENDS ALSO that this procedure only lasts for a limited period of time, as recommended in theannex to the present resolution. Annex PROCEDURES AND ARRANGEMENTS FOR ISSUING GMDSS CERTIFICATES TO HOLDERS OF NON-GMDSS CERTIFICATES1 INTRODUCTION1.1 GMDSS operator certificates should only be issued to candidates who have passed an appropriate ex-amination verifying that the candidate has reached the required level of competence, taking into account therecommendations of the Organization. This requirement also applies to candidates who hold a non-GMDSSoperator certificate.
  • Annex 2-15 – Page 2 GMDSS Handbook1.2 However, Administrations may make arrangements, as described in the following paragraphs, to permitcertain holders of non-GMDSS certificates to obtain a GMDSS certificate after passing a ‘‘limited GMDSSexamination’’.1.3 Arrangements for ‘‘limited GMDSS examinations’’ should cease on 1 February 1997. After this date allcandidates should be required to pass the full GMDSS examination.2 REQUIREMENTS FOR CANDIDATES HOLDING NON-GMDSS CERTIFICATES2.1 Candidates wishing to obtain a General Operator’s Certificate (GOC) after a ‘‘limited GMDSS examina-tion’’ should hold a valid non-GMDSS certificate of one of the following types, issued before 1 February 1997: .1 Radiocommunication Operator’s General Certificate for the Maritime Mobile Service (MRGC); .2 First or Second Class Radiotelegraph Operator’s Certificate; .3 Radiotelephone Operator’s General Certificate; or .4 Radiotelephone Operator’s Restricted Certificate for the combination of VHF, MF and HF.2.2 Candidates wishing to obtain a Restricted Operator’s Certificate (ROC) after a ‘‘limited GMDSS ex-amination’’ should hold a valid certificate of one of the types listed above, or any Radiotelephone Operator’sRestricted Certificate issued before 1 February 1997.3 REQUIREMENTS FOR CANDIDATES REGARDING PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE AND TRAINING IN USE OF GMDSS EQUIPMENT3.1 A ‘‘limited GMDSS examination’’ for GOC should only be offered to candidates who have practicalexperience or familiarity with relevant GMDSS equipment and procedures appropriate for a ship engaged onvoyages in all sea areas.3.2 Candidates for a ROC should have experience or familiarity with equipment and procedures appropriate fora ship engaged on voyages exclusively in sea area A1.3.3 Each candidate should have had at least six months operational experience, preferably on board ships, since 1February 1992, and should be able to provide proof of such experience.3.4 The candidate should receive supplementary training in the use of, and operational procedures for, allGMDSS equipment with which he has no experience or familiarity. The candidate should provide proof of suchtraining.4 ARRANGEMENTS FOR ‘‘LIMITED GMDSS EXAMINATION’’4.1 Each Administration may decide the practical arrangements to use for ‘‘limited GMDSS examination’’ (i.e.whether to use a ‘‘traditional classroom-type examination’’ or to accept different arrangements), provided that thefollowing requirements are fulfilled in all cases: .1 The examination should verify – with a high degree of certainty – whether or not the candidate posesses the knowledge and skills needed for correct operation of all relevant types of GMDSS equipment. .2 As a minimum, the content of each ‘‘limited GMDSS examination’’ should be such as to check that the candidate has knowledge and skills as follows: .2.1 Candidates for a GOC: appendix 1 .2.2 Candidates for a ROC: appendix 2 .3 Precautions should be taken to prevent candidates being given the opportunity of receiving or using any kind of unauthorized written or verbal assistance during examination.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-15 – Page 3 .4 The evaluation of whether or not the candidate has proved that he possesses the necessary knowledge and skills during the limited examination should always be done by a person authorized by the Administration. Appendix 1 Examination syllabus applicable to limited GMDSS examinations for the General Operator’s Certificate1 Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS)1.1 Sea area concept and the GMDSS Master Plan1.2 Functions of the GMDSS .1 Alerting .2 Search and Rescue (SAR) co-ordinating communications .3 On-scene communications .4 Locating and homing signals .5 Dissemination of maritime safety information (MSI) .6 General radiocommunications .7 Bridge-to-bridge communications1.3 Means of ensuring availability of the GMDSS functional requirements .1 Equipment maintenance strategies1.4 Sources of energy of ship stations1.5 GMDSS frequencies1.6 Protection of distress frequencies .1 Guard bands .2 Test on distress frequencies .3 Transmissions during distress traffic .4 Avoiding harmful interference .5 Prevention of unauthorized transmissions1.7 Watchkeeping on GMDSS frequencies1.8 Carriage requirements of ship stations1.9 Licences, radio safety certificates, inspections and surveys1.10 Radio record keeping2 SAR Operations in the GMDSS2.1 The role of rescue co-ordination centres (RCCs)2.2 Merchant Ship Search and Rescue Manual (MERSAR)2.3 Maritime rescue organizations2.4 Ship reporting systems
  • Annex 2-15 – Page 4 GMDSS Handbook3 Communication procedures in the GMDSS3.1 Distress communications via a ship station .1 Digital selective calling (DSC) distress alert .1.1 The definition of a distress alert .1.2 Transmission of a distress alert .1.3 Transmission of a shore-to-ship distress alert relay .1.4 Transmission of a distress alert by a station not itself in distress .2 Receipt and acknowledgement of a DSC distress alert .2.1 Acknowledgement procedure by radiotelephony .2.2 Acknowledgement procedure by narrow-band direct printing (NBDP) .2.3 Receipt and acknowledgement by a coast station .2.4 Receipt and acknowledgement by a ship station .3 Handling of distress alerts .3.1 Preparations for handling of distress traffic .3.2 Distress traffic terminology .4 On-scene communications .5 SAR operation3.2 Urgency and safety communications via a ship station .1 The meaning of urgency and safety communications .2 Procedures for DSC urgency and safety calls .3 Urgency communications .4 Medical transport .5 Safety communications3.3 Testing DSC equipment3.4 Distress communications via a ship earth station .1 Inmarsat-A .1.1 Use of the distress facility .1.2 Satellite acquisition .1.3 Telex and telephony distress calls .1.4 Procedures for distress calls .1.5 RCCs associated with the coast earth stations .2 Inmarsat-C .2.1 Store-and-forward operation .2.2 Entering/updating position .2.3 Sending a distress alert .2.4 Sending a distress priority message .2.5 2-digit code services
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-15 – Page 54 GMDSS Subsystems4.1 Alerting and locating signals .1 Purpose and definition .2 Emergency position-indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs) .2.1 Satellite EPIRBs .2.1.1 The COSPAS/SARSAT 406 MHz EPIRB .2.1.2 The Inmarsat-E 1.6 GHz EPIRB .2.2 The VHF DSC EPIRB .3 The search and rescue radar transponder (SART)4.2 Maritime safety information (MSI) .1 Reception by NAVTEX .2 Reception by Inmarsat enhanced group calling (EGC) system .3 Reception by HF NBDP .4 Dissemination of meteorological and navigational warnings Appendix 2 Examination syllabus applicable to limited GMDSS examinations for the Restricted Operator’s Certificate1 Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS)1.1 Sea area concept and the GMDSS Master Plan1.2 Functions of the GMDSS .1 Alerting .2 Search and Rescue (SAR) co-ordinating communications .3 On-scene communications .4 Locating and homing signals .5 Dissemination of maritime safety information (MSI) .6 General radiocommunications .7 Bridge-to-bridge communications1.3 Means of ensuring availability of the GMDSS functional requirements .1 Equipment maintenance strategies1.4 Sources of energy of ship stations1.5 GMDSS frequencies1.6 Protection of distress frequencies .1 Guard bands .2 Test on distress frequencies .3 Transmissions during distress traffic
  • Annex 2-15 – Page 6 GMDSS Handbook .4 Avoiding harmful interference .5 Prevention of unauthorized transmissions.1.7 Watchkeeping on GMDSS frequencies1.8 Carriage requirements of ship stations1.9 Licences, radio safety certificates, inspections and surveys1.10 Radio record keeping2 SAR Operations in the GMDSS2.1 The role of rescue co-ordination centres (RCCs)2.2 Merchant Ship Search and Rescue Manual (MERSAR)2.3 Maritime rescue organizations2.4 Ship reporting systems3 Communication procedures in the GMDSS3.1 Distress communications via a ship station .1 Digital selective calling (DSC) distress alert .1.1 The definition of a distress alert .1.2 Transmission of a distress alert .1.3 Transmission of a shore-to-ship distress alert relay .1.4 Transmission of a distress alert by a station not itself in distress .2 Receipt and acknowledgement of DSC distress alert .2.1 Acknowledgement procedure by radiotelephony .2.2 Receipt and acknowledgement by a coast station .2.3 Receipt and acknowledgement by a ship station .3 Handling of distress alerts .3.1 Preparations for handling of distress traffic .3.2 Distress traffic terminology .4 On-scene communications .5 SAR operation3.2 Urgency and safety communications via a ship station .1 The meaning of urgency and safety communications .2 Procedures for DSC urgency and safety calls .3 Urgency communications .4 Medical transport .5 Safety communications3.3 Testing of DSC equipment.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-15 – Page 74 GMDSS Subsystems4.1 Alerting and locating signals .1 Purpose and definition .2 Emergency position-indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs) .2.1 Satellite EPIRBs .2.1.1 The COSPAS/SARSAT 406 MHz EPIRB .2.1.2 The Inmarsat-E 1.6 GHz EPIRB .2.2 The VHF DSC EPIRB .3 The search and rescue radar transponder (SART)4.2 Maritime safety information (MSI) .1 Reception by NAVTEX .2 Reception by Inmarsat enhanced group calling (EGC) system .3 Dissemination of meteorological and navigational warnings
  • Annex 2-16 – Page 1 GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-16 Resolution A.801(19) (Adopted on 23 November 1995) PROVISION OF RADIO SERVICES FOR THE GLOBAL MARITIME DISTRESS AND SAFETY SYSTEM (GMDSS)THE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,RECALLING ALSO that regulation IV/5 of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS),1974 as amended in 1988, requires each Contracting Government to undertake to make available, either in-dividually or in co-operation with other Contracting Governments, as they may deem practical and necessary,appropriate shore-based facilities for terrestrial and space radio services having due regard to the recommendationsof the Organization,RECALLING FURTHER that the Inmarsat system provides for radiocommunication services, including those fordistress and safety, utilizing geostationary satellites in the 1.5 and 1.6 GHz band,NOTING that the COSPAS–SARSAT system provides for the reception of distress alerts on the frequency406 MHz utilizing polar-orbiting satellites,NOTING ALSO that regulation IV/5 of the 1974 SOLAS Convention requires the following radio services to beprovided: . a radiocommunication service utilizing geostationary satellites in the maritime mobile satellite service, . a radiocommunication service utilizing polar-orbiting satellites in the mobile satellite service, . the maritime mobile service in the bands between 156 MHz and 174 MHz, . the maritime mobile service in the bands between 4,000 kHz and 27,500 kHz, and . the maritime mobile service in the bands 415 kHz to 535 kHz and 1,605 kHz to 4,000 kHz,NOTING FURTHER that the provision contained in paragraph 5.1.1 of the annex to the International Con-vention on Maritime Search and Rescue, 1979, requires that Parties shall ensure that such continuous radiowatches as are deemed practicable and necessary are maintained on international distress frequencies,TAKING INTO ACCOUNT the resolutions of the World Administrative Radio Conference for Mobile Services,1987, in particular resolution 331 (Mob-87) relating to the introduction of provisions for the global maritimedistress and safety system (GMDSS) and the continuation of the existing distress and safety provisions, andresolution 322 (Rev. Mob-87) relating to coast stations and coast earth stations assuming watchkeeping re-sponsibilities on certain frequencies in connection with the implementation of distress and safety communicationsfor the GMDSS,TAKING INTO ACCOUNT ALSO resolution 3, Recommendation on the Early Introduction of the GlobalMaritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Elements, adopted by the 1988 GMDSS Conference,
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-16 – Page 2CONSIDERING that the GMDSS will use digital selective calling equipment operating in the MF, HF and VHFbands,CONSIDERING ALSO that ships should not be required to install equipment intended primarily for ship/shorecommunication functions when operating in areas where no corresponding shore-based facilities are available,CONSIDERING FURTHER that it is necessary to provide radio services for transmission and reception of distressand safety communications and that not all coast stations will be obliged to provide for such distress and safetycommunications,HAVING CONSIDERED the recommendation made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its sixty-third session,1. ADOPTS the Recommendation on Provision of Radio Services for the GMDSS, the Criteria for Use WhenProviding Shore-Based Digital Selective Calling (DSC) Facilities for Use in the GMDSS, the Criteria forEstablishing GMDSS Sea Areas, the Criteria for Use When Providing a NAVTEX Service and the Criteria forUse When Providing Inmarsat Shore-Based Facilities for Use in the GMDSS set out respectively in annexes 1, 2,3, 4 and 5 to the present resolution;2. RECOMMENDS that Governments undertake, as a matter of urgency, a review of the need to provideshore-based facilities to support the GMDSS and to make available, either individually or in co-operation withother Governments, adequate shore-based facilities for terrestrial and space radio services deemed practicable andnecessary;3. URGES Governments to provide, either individually or in co-operation with other Governments, the radioservices deemed practicable and necessary for the proper operation of the GMDSS;4. INVITES Governments and organizations concerned to inform the Secretary-General of radio facilities to beprovided in support of the GMDSS in response to this resolution;5. REQUESTS the Maritime Safety Committee to keep this resolution under review and to adopt amendmentsthereto, as necessary;6. REVOKES resolution A.704(17). Annex 1 RECOMMENDATION ON PROVISION OF RADIO SERVICES FOR THE GMDSS1 Governments should establish such coast stations, individually or in co-operation with other Governments,as are needed to designate a sea area or areas A1 or A2, or both, off their coasts. Each sea area should be establishedin accordance with the criteria for establishing GMDSS areas recommended in annex 3.2 Areas not defined by Governments as sea areas A1 or A2 will, as appropriate, be designated as sea areas A3 orA4 in accordance with regulations IV/2.14 and IV/2.15 of the 1974 SOLAS Convention, as amended in 1988.3 Each Government should submit to the Organization information on the sea area or sea areas A1, A2 andA3, NAVTEX and/or International SafetyNET service areas it has established for the GMDSS and on anychanges which may affect the sea area or areas it has so defined.4 Governments, taking into account annex 2, should, as appropriate, make provision for radio-communications in each sea area A1 or A2 they have defined and, in addition, Governments are invited toprovide for radiocommunications in sea areas A3 or A4, as appropriate, for the purposes of: .1 reception of ship-to-shore distress alerting; in particular, facilities for receiving distress alerts on the frequency 406 MHz are urgently needed in the southern hemisphere; .2 transmission of shore-to-ship distress alerting; .3 transmission and reception of search and rescue co-ordinating communications; .4 transmission and reception of navigational and meteorological warnings and urgent information; and .5 transmission and reception of general radiocommunications.
  • Annex 2-16 – Page 3 GMDSS Handbook Annex 2 CRITERIA FOR USE WHEN PROVIDING SHORE-BASED DIGITAL SELECTIVE CALLING (DSC) FACILITIES FOR USE IN THE GMDSS1 Governments desiring to provide an HF coast station facility for use in the GMDSS should notify theOrganization of their intention so that the Organization can maintain and circulate a complete list of stationsproviding HF DSC distress watch. Governments should ensure that such shore-based HF DSC facilities areprovided in accordance with the criteria contained in appendix 1.2 Governments, individually or in co-operation with other Governments within a specific SAR region,desiring to provide MF coast station DSC facilities serving, either wholly or in part, a particular sea area A2 shouldnotify the Organization as to the extent of continuous coverage and the extent of coverage from shore. Thisinformation should be determined by Governments in accordance with the criteria for establishing GMDSS seaareas contained in annex 3. Governments should ensure that shore-based MF coast station DSC facilities pro-viding part of this sea area A2 coverage, are provided in accordance with appendix 2.3 Governments, individually or in co-operation with other Governments within a specific SAR region,desiring to provide VHF coast station DSC facilities serving, either wholly or in part, a particular sea area A1should notify the Organization as to the extent of continuous coverage and the extent of coverage from shore.This information should be determined by Governments in accordance with the criteria contained in annex 3.Governments should ensure that shore-based VHF coast station DSC facilities providing part of this sea area A1coverage are provided in accordance with appendix 3.4 The Organization should maintain a master plan of all sea areas covered by MF and VHF coast station DSCfacilities and should periodically circulate an updated copy of the description of such sea areas to Governments. Appendix 11 Basic principles for establishing HF DSC coast stations for sea areas A3 and A4The selection of HF DSC coast stations for sea areas A3 and A4 should be based on the following principles: .1 each ocean area requiring HF guard should have a minimum of two stations to provide the required HF cover; .2 where practicable, stations should be selected on opposite sides of an ocean area; and .3 in ocean areas of high traffic density, e.g. the North Atlantic, more than two stations should be provided.2 Criteria for the selection of HF DSC stationsStations participating in HF DSC watchkeeping in the GMDSS should: .1 be affiliated to an RCC and have reliable communications by telephone and telex; .2 have long-range HF communication capability in all HF bands; .3 monitor all HF DSC distress frequencies in order to avoid the multiplication of communications links between RCCs which would be required if several stations divided the watchkeeping on different frequencies; .4 provide as complete a coverage of their ocean area as possible; .5 be in continuous operation; and .6 be able to relay communications under a common procedure.3 Availability of participating HF stationsThe minimum number of coast stations indicated in 1.1 for any given ocean area may need to be adjusted infuture in order to: .1 provide full back-up in the event of operational failure; and .2 confirm full HF coverage as a result of future tests.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-16 – Page 4 Appendix 21 Basic principles for establishing sea area A2The selection of MF DSC coast stations for sea area A2 should be based on the following principles: .1 each sea area designated as A2 requires a continuous MF guard on the distress frequencies and a sufficient number of coast stations to provide MF coverage in the coastal area of the Government concerned; and .2 in certain areas, several Governments may collectively provide complete coverage (e.g. the North Sea).2 Criteria for provision of MF DSC stationsStations participating in MF DSC watchkeeping in the GMDSS should: .1 be affiliated to an RCC and have reliable communications by telephone and telex; .2 have medium-range MF capability; .3 provide as complete a coverage of their immediate sea area as possible; and .4 be in continuous operation. Appendix 31 Basic principles for establishing sea area A1The selection of VHF DSC coast stations for sea area A1 should be based on the following principles: .1 each sea area designated as A1 requires a continuous VHF guard and should have the minimum number of stations necessary to provide VHF coverage in the coastal area of the Government con- cerned; and .2 in certain areas, several Governments may collectively provide complete coverage along their coasts (e.g. the North Sea).2 Criteria for the provision of VHF DSC stationsStations participating in VHF DSC watchkeeping in the GMDSS should: .1 be affiliated to an RCC and have reliable communications by telephone and telex; .2 have short-range VHF capability; .3 provide as complete a coverage of their immediate sea area as possible; and .4 be in continuous operation. Annex 3 CRITERIA FOR ESTABLISHING GMDSS SEA AREAS1 INTRODUCTIONIt is intended that Governments should use the following criteria as guidance when determining the four mutuallyexclusive sea areas off their coasts, which are defined in regulations IV/2.12, IV/2.13, IV/2.14 and IV/2.15 of the1974 SOLAS Convention, as amended in 1988.2 SEA AREA A12.1 GeneralThe communication range of stations operating in the maritime mobile VHF band is likely to be limited bypropagation factors rather than lack of radiated power.
  • Annex 2-16 – Page 5 GMDSS Handbook2.2 Guidance criteriaSea area A1 is that sea area which is within a circle of radius A nautical miles over which the radio propagationpath lies substantially over water. The radius A is equal to the transmission distance between a ship’s VHF antennaat a height of 4 m above sea level and the antenna of the VHF coast station which lies at the centre of the circle.2.3 Determination of radius A2.3.1 The following formula should be used to calculate the range A in nautical miles: pffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi pffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi A ¼ 2:5ð H ðin metresÞ þ h ðin metresÞÞH is the height of the coast station VHF receiving antenna and h is the height of the ship’s transmitting antenna,which is assumed to be 4 m.2.3.2 The following table gives the range in nautical miles (n m) for typical values of H: H h 50 m 100 m 4m 23 NM 30 NM2.3.3 The formula given above applies to line-of-sight cases but is not considered adequate for cases where bothantennae are at a low level. The VHF range in sea area A1 should be verified by field strength measurements.3 SEA AREA A23.1 General3.1.1 Consideration of the reception of radio signals in the 2 MHz band indicates that the range is likely to belimited by propagation conditions and atmospheric noise, which are affected by variations in geographicalposition and time of day, as well as radiated power.3.1.2 The theoretical distance to be expected from ground-wave propagation can be determined by referenceto the ‘‘Ground-wave propagation curves: Sea Water’’ in Recommendation ITU-R PN.368-7, adjusted asnecessary to take account of the actual radiated field strength from the transmitting antenna and the minimumfield strength necessary for the proper operation of a receiver conforming with resolution A.804(19).3.1.3 The determination of the minimum signal level required for satisfactory radio reception in the absence ofother unwanted signals necessitates taking account of the noise with which the wanted signal must compete.ITU-R Report 322 gives the world distribution of values of noise level and of other noise parameters and showsthe method of using these in the evaluation of the probable performance of a radio circuit.3.2 Guidance criteriaSea area A2 is that sea area which is within a circle of radius B nautical miles over which the propagation path liessubstantially over water and which is not part of any sea area A1, the centre of the circle being the position of thecoast station receiving antenna.3.3 Determination of radius BThe radius B may be determined for each coast station by reference to Recommendation ITU-R PN.368-7 andITU-R Report 322 for the performance of a single-sideband (J3E) system under the following conditions: Frequency – 2182 kHz Bandwidth – 3 kHz Propagation – ground wave Time of day – * Season – * { Ship’s transmitter power (PEP) – 60 W* Administrations should determine time periods and seasons appropriate to their geographic area, based on prevailing noise level.{ See footnote to regulation IV/16(c)(i) of the 1981 amendments to the 1974 SOLAS Convention.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-16 – Page 6 Ship’s antenna efficiency – 25% S/N (RF) – 9 dB (voice) Mean transmitter power – 8 dB below peak power Fading margin – 3 dBThe range of sea area A2 should be verified by field strength measurements.4 AREA A3 – Guidance criteriaSea area A3 is that sea area of the world not being part of any sea area A1 or A2 within which the elevation angleof an Inmarsat satellite is 58 or more.5 AREA A4 – Guidance criteriaSea area A4 is that sea area of the world not being part of any seas area A1, A2 or A3. Annex 4 CRITERIA FOR USE WHEN PROVIDING A NAVTEX SERVICE1 There are two basic areas which must be defined when establishing a NAVTEX service. They are:Coverage area: an area defined by an arc of a circle having a radius from the transmitter calculated according to themethod and criteria given in this annex.Service area: a unique and precisely defined sea area, wholly contained within the coverage area, for which MSI isprovided from a particular NAVTEX transmitter. It is normally defined by a line which takes full account of localpropagation conditions and the character and volume of information and maritime traffic patterns in the region.2 Governments desiring to provide a NAVTEX service should use the following criteria for calculating thecoverage area of the NAVTEX transmitter they intend to install, in order to: . determine the most appropriate location for NAVTEX stations having regard to existing or planned stations; . avoid interference with existing or planned NAVTEX stations; and . establish a service area for promulgation to seafarers.3 The ground-wave coverage may be determined for each coast station by reference to RecommendationITU-R PN.368-7 and ITU-R Report 322 for the performance of a system under the following conditions:: Frequency – 518 kHz Bandwidth – 500 Hz Propagation – ground wave Time of day – * Season – * { Transmitter power – { Antenna efficiency – RF S/N in 500 Hz band width – 8 dB{ Percentage of time – 904 Full coverage of the NAVTEX service area should be verified by field strength measurements.* Administrations should determine time periods in accordance with the NAVTEX time transmission table (NAVTEX Manual, figure 3) andseasons appropriate to their geographic area based on prevailing noise level.{ The range of a NAVTEX transmitter depends on the transmitter power and local propagation conditions. The actual range achieved should beadjusted to the minimum required for adequate reception in the NAVTEX area served, taking into account the needs of ships approaching fromother areas. Experience has indicated that the required range of 250 to 400 nautical miles can generally be attained by transmitter power in the rangebetween 100 and 1,000 W during daylight with a 60% reduction at night.{ Bit error rate 1 6 10–2.
  • Annex 2-16 – Page 7 GMDSS Handbook Annex 5 CRITERIA FOR USE WHEN PROVIDING INMARSAT SHORE-BASED FACILITIES FOR USE IN THE GMDSS1 Governments desiring to provide an Inmarsat coast earth station facility for use in the GMDSS should notifythe Organization of their intention so that the Organization can maintain and circulate a complete list of stationsproviding distress watch. Governments should ensure that such shore-based facilities are provided in accordancewith the criteria contained in the appendix.2 Governments, individually or in co-operation with other Governments within a specific SAR region,desiring to provide Inmarsat coast earth station facilities serving, either wholly or in part, particular sea areasshould notify the Organization as to the extent of continuous coverage and the extent of coverage from shore.This information should be determined by Governments in accordance with the criteria for establishing GMDSSsea areas contained in annex 3 to the present resolution.3 The Organization should maintain in the GMDSS Master Plan details of all sea areas covered by Inmarsatcoast earth station facilities and should periodically circulate an updated copy of the description of these sea areasto Governments.4 Governments having coast earth stations participating in the GMDSS should ensure that those stationsconform with these criteria specified in 2 of the appendix to this annex and ensure that only those stations arelisted in the GMDSS Master Plan. Appendix1 Basic principles for establishing Inmarsat coast earth stations for GMDSS services1.1 The selection of Inmarsat coast earth stations for GMDSS services should be based on the followingprinciple: each ocean area requiring guard should have a minimum of two coast earth stations to provide the required cover for each system.1.2 The minimum number of coast earth stations indicated in 1.1 for any given ocean area may need to beadjusted in future in order to provide full back-up in the event of operational failure.2 Criteria for Inmarsat coast earth stations2.1 Inmarsat coast earth stations participating in the GMDSS should: .1 meet the Inmarsat technical requirements confirmed by Inmarsat type acceptance and commissioning tests; .2 operate in compliance with the Inmarsat system operating procedures (SOP) for distress alerting and distress communications; .3 have a registered associated RCC and have reliable communications by telephone, telex, or other means; .4 be in continuous operation; and .5 support the following GMDSS communications functions: .5.1 ship-to-RCC distress alerting preferably by a dedicated link; .5.2 RCC-to-ship(s) distress alert relay preferably by a dedicated link; .5.3 RCC-to-RCC co-ordinating communications by using SES terminals; .5.4 transmit maritime safety information (Inmarsat-C only); and .5.5 receiving maritime safety information.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-16 – Page 82.2 Stations with store-and-forward systems should: .1 make an initial attempt to deliver a ship-to-shore or shore-to-ship message within 60 s for any distress alert or traffic, and 10 min for all other safety messages, from the time the receiving station receives the message; .2 generate the notification of non-delivery immediately once the message is considered non-deliverable; and .3 activate an aural/visual alarm to alert a designated responsible person if the distress traffic cannot be forwarded within the criteria of paragraph 2.2.1.2.3 Stations with circuit switching systems should immediately attempt to deliver a ship-to-shore or shore-to-ship distress alert or traffic.2.4 Stations should: .1 be capable of recognizing distress alerts in the ship-to-shore direction; .2 be capable of recognizing the following categories of priorities in both the ship-to-shore and shore-to- ship direction: – maritime distress, – all other maritime (urgency, safety and routine); and .3 ensure the avoidance of degradation of, or obstructions to, urgency and safety maritime commu- nications by employing four levels of priority in the shore-to-ship and ship-to-shore directions, by differentiating non-maritime from maritime communications or by other means established by Inmarsat.
  • Annex 2-17 – Page 1 GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-17 Resolution A.814(19) (Adopted on 23 November 1995) GUIDELINES FOR THE AVOIDANCE OF FALSE DISTRESS ALERTSTHE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety and the preventionand control of marine pollution from ships,CONSIDERING problems reported by Member Governments in regard to the proper operation of the GMDSS,in particular that false distress alerts are becoming a major obstacle to the efficient operation of search and rescue(SAR) services,RECALLING that the GMDSS was developed on the basis of resolution 6 of the International Conference onMaritime Search and Rescue, 1979, and that according to that resolution the GMDSS should provide, amongother things, the essential radio elements of the international SAR plan,NOTING that the excessive amount of false distress alerts imposes a considerable and unnecessary burden onRescue Co-ordination Centres (RCCs), may have adverse effects on seafarers’ confidence in the GMDSS, andcould also have a potentially serious impact on real distress situations and on safety of life at sea,BEING AWARE that, if a substantive reduction in the number of false distress alerts now occurring is not achievedin the near future, the quality and efficiency of SAR organizations may be jeopardized,CONSIDERING that an urgent dissemination of some of the problems which have become evident to providers ofrescue services would help to educate people and organizations involved and eventually contribute to a reductionin the number of false distress alerts,CONSIDERING ALSO that Administrations, manufacturers, educators, users, providers of communications andrescue services, and all others concerned need guidance on ways and means of reducing false distress alerts,HAVING CONSIDERED the recommendation made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its sixty-fifth session,1. ADOPTS the Guidelines for Avoiding False Distress Alerts set out in the annex to the present resolution;2. URGES Governments to bring these Guidelines to the attention of all concerned. Annex GUIDELINES FOR AVOIDING FALSE DISTRESS ALERTS1 Administrations should: .1 inform shipowners and seafarers about the implications of the rising number of false distress alerts; .2 take steps to enable ships properly to register all GMDSS equipment, and ensure that this registration data is readily available to RCCs; .3 consider establishing and using national enforcement measures to prosecute those who: .3.1 inadvertently transmit a false distress alert without proper cancellation, or who fail to respond to a distress alert due to misuse or negligence; .3.2 repeatedly transmit false distress alerts; and .3.3 deliberately transmit false distress alerts; .4 use the International Telecommunication Union violation reporting process for false distress alerts, or for failure to respond to a distress alert relayed from shore to ship;
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-17 – Page 2 .5 ensure that all relevant ship personnel know how GMDSS equipment operates, the importance of avoiding false distress alerts, the steps to be taken to prevent the transmission of such false distress alerts, and the procedures to be followed when a false distress alert has been transmitted; .6 inform type-approval authorities of false distress alert problems, in order to draw their attention to the testing and alerting functions of radio equipment during the type approval process; .7 urge companies installing radio equipment to ensure that relevant ship personnel are made familiar with the operation of the installed equipment; .8 investigate the cause when a specific model of GMDSS equipment repeatedly transmits unwanted distress alerts, and inform the appropriate organizations accordingly; .9 ensure that surveyors and inspectors are informed about GMDSS equipment, and particularly about how to operate and test it without transmitting a false distress alert; and .10 require that GMDSS radio operators be appropriately certificated.2 Manufacturers, suppliers and installers should: .1 design equipment for distress alerting so that: .1.1 it will not be possible to transmit a distress alert unintentionally; .1.2 the panel for emergency operation is separated from the one for normal operation and is partially fitted with a cover, and the switches on the panel are clearly classified by colouring; and .1.3 there are standardized arrangements of operation panels and operational procedures; .2 design test features so that the testing of GMDSS equipment will not result in the transmission of false distress alerts; .3 ensure that any distress alert activation is indicated visually or acoustically, or both, and shows that the equipment is transmitting a distress alert until manually deactivated; .4 ensure that the satellite EPIRB position on board, installations (including the release and activation mechanisms) and handling procedures preclude unwanted activation (designing the EPIRB so that when it is out of its bracket it must also be immersed in water to activate automatically, and so that, when operated manually, a two-step activation action is required); .5 provide clear and precise operational instructions that are easy to understand (maintenance and op- erational instructions should be separated, and should be written both in English and in any other language deemed necessary); .6 ensure that when any GMDSS equipment has been installed, the necessary instructions are given to ship personnel, drawing specific attention to operational procedures (a record should be kept that such instructions have been given); and .7 ensure that supply and installation personnel understand how the GMDSS works, and the con- sequences of transmitting a false distress alert.3 Trainers and educators should: .1 ensure that maritime education centres are informed about false distress alert problems and their implications for SAR, the GMDSS, etc., and procedures to be followed if a false distress alert is transmitted, and include them in their teaching programmes; .2 obtain and use actual case histories as examples; .3 emphasize the need to avoid false distress alerts; and .4 ensure that no inadvertent transmission of a false distress alert occurs when training on GMDSS equipment.4 Companies, masters and seafarers should, as appropriate: .1 ensure that all GMDSS certificated personnel responsible for sending a distress alert have been in- structed about, and are competent to operate, the particular radio equipment on the ship;
  • Annex 2-17 – Page 3 GMDSS Handbook .2 ensure that the person or persons responsible for communications during distress incidents give the necessary instructions and information to all crew members on how to use GMDSS equipment to send a distress alert; .3 ensure that as part of each ‘‘abandon ship’’ drill, instruction is given on how emergency equipment should be used to provide GMDSS functions; .4 ensure that GMDSS equipment testing is only undertaken under the supervision of the person re- sponsible for communications during distress incidents; .5 ensure that GMDSS equipment testing or drills are never allowed to cause false distress alerts; .6 ensure that encoded identities of satellite EPIRBs, which are used by SAR personnel responding to emergencies, are properly registered in a database accessible 24 h a day or automatically provided to SAR authorities (masters should confirm that their EPIRBs have been registered with such a database, to help SAR services identify the ship in the event of distress and rapidly obtain other information which will enable them to respond appropriately); .7 ensure that EPIRB, Inmarsat and DSC registration data is immediately updated if there is any change in information relating to the ship such as owner, name or flag, and that the necessary action is taken to reprogramme the ship’s new data in the GMDSS equipment concerned; .8 ensure that, for new ships, positions for installing EPIRBs are considered at the earliest stage of ship design and construction; .9 ensure that satellite EPIRBs are carefully installed in accordance with manufacturers’ instructions and using qualified personnel (sometimes satellite EPIRBs are damaged or broken due to improper handling or installation. They must be installed in a location that will enable them to float free and automatically activate if the ship sinks. Care must be taken to ensure that they are not tampered with or accidentally activated. If the coding has to be changed or the batteries serviced, manufacturers’ requirements must be strictly followed. There have been cases where EPIRB lanyards were attached to the ship so that the EPIRB could not float free; lanyards are only to be used by survivors for securing the EPIRB to a survival craft or person in water); .10 ensure that EPIRBs are not activated if assistance is already immediately available (EPIRBs are in- tended to call for assistance if the ship is unable to obtain help by other means, and to provide position information and homing signals for SAR units); .11 ensure that, if a distress alert has been accidentally transmitted, the ship makes every reasonable attempt to communicate with the RCC by any means to cancel the false distress alert using the procedures given in the appendix; .12 ensure that, if possible, after emergency use, the EPIRB is retrieved and deactivated; and .13 ensure that when an EPIRB is damaged and needs to be disposed of, if a ship is sold for scrap, or if for any other reason a satellite EPIRB will no longer be used, the satellite EPIRB is made inoperable, either by removing its battery and, if possible, returning it to the manufacturer, or by demolishing it. Note: If the EPIRB is returned to the manufacturer, it should be wrapped in tin foil to prevent transmission of signals during shipment. Appendix Instructions for mariners and others* on how to cancel a false distress alertDSC1 VHF .1 switch off transmitter immediately;{ .2 switch equipment on and set to channel 16; and* Appropriate signals should precede these messages in accordance with the ITU Radio Regulations chapter NIX.{ This applies when the false alert is detected during transmission.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-17 – Page 4 .3 make broadcast to ‘‘All Stations’’ giving the ship’s name, call sign and DSC number, and cancel the false distress alert. Example All Stations, All Stations, All Stations This is NAME, CALL SIGN, DSC NUMBER, POSITION. Cancel my distress alert of DATE, TIME UTC, = Master NAME, CALL SIGN, DSC NUMBER, DATE, TIME UTC.2 MF .1 switch off equipment immediately;* .2 switch equipment on and tune for radiotelephony transmission on 2,182 kHz; and .3 make broadcast to ‘‘All Stations’’ giving the ship’s name, call sign and DSC number, and cancel the false distress alert. Example All Stations, All Stations, All Stations This is NAME, CALL SIGN, DSC NUMBER, POSITION. Cancel my distress alert of DATE, TIME UTC, = Master NAME, CALL SIGN, DSC NUMBER, DATE, TIME UTC.3 HFAs for MF, but the alert must be cancelled on all the frequency bands on which it was transmitted. Hence, in stage2.2 the transmitter should be tuned consecutively to the radiotelephony distress frequencies in the 4, 6, 8, 12 and16 MHz bands, as necessary.4 Inmarsat-CNotify the appropriate RCC to cancel the alert by sending a distress priority message via the same CES throughwhich the false distress alert was sent. Example of message NAME, CALL SIGN, IDENTITY NUMBER, POSITION, Cancel my Inmarsat-C distress alert of DATE, TIME UTC = Master +5 EPIRBsIf for any reason an EPIRB is activated accidentally, the ship should contact the nearest coast station or anappropriate coast earth station or RCC and cancel the distress alert.6 General6.1 Notwithstanding the above, ships may use any means available to them to inform the appropriate authoritiesthat a false distress alert has been transmitted and should be cancelled.6.2 No action will normally be taken against any ship or mariner for reporting and cancelling a false distressalert. However, in view of the serious consequences of false alerts, and the strict ban on their transmission,Governments may prosecute in cases of repeated violations.* This applies when the false alert is detected during transmission.
  • Annex 2-18 – Page 1 GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-18 Resolution A.887(21) (Adopted on 25 November 1999) ESTABLISHMENT, UPDATING AND RETRIEVAL OF THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THE REGISTRATION DATABASES FOR THE GLOBAL MARITIME DISTRESS AND SAFETY SYSTEM (GMDSS)THE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning thefunctions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,RECALLING ALSO regulation IV/5-1 of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS),1974, as amended, which requires that each Contracting Government undertakes to ensure that suitable ar-rangements are made for registering Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) identities and formaking information on these identities available to rescue co-ordination centres on a 24-hour basis,RECOGNIZING the need to continuously update the information contained in the registration databases for theGMDSS,RECOGNIZING ALSO that the information in such registration databases is essential for search and rescuepurposes,HAVING CONSIDERED the recommendation made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its seventieth session,1. ADOPTS the Recommendation on the Establishment, Updating and Retrieval of the Information Con-tained in the Registration Databases for the GMDSS set out in the annex to the present resolution;2. RECOMMENDS Governments to ensure that the information contained in the registration databases for theGMDSS and their continuous updating and availability to rescue co-ordination centres is in accordance with theannexed Recommendation;3. REVOKES resolution A.764(18). AnnexRECOMMENDATION ON ESTABLISHMENT, UPDATING AND RETRIEVAL OF THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THE REGISTRATION DATABASES FOR THE GLOBAL MARITIME DISTRESS AND SAFETY SYSTEM (GMDSS)1 All identities that may be used for identifying ships in distress should be registered in accordance with thisresolution and the data should be updated whenever it changes.2 Every State requiring or allowing the use of these GMDSS systems should make suitable arrangements forensuring registrations of these identities are made, maintained and enforced.3 Those responsible for maintaining registration databases for GMDSS equipment should ensure that anyMRCC can immediately access the registration data at any time.4 Means should be provided for the GMDSS equipment licensee, owner or the ship’s master to easily andexpediently update emergency information in the registration database.5 All databases for GMDSS equipment should have an identical data format to permit immediate accessamong each other.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-18 – Page 26 All equipment using Maritime Mobile Service Identities (MMSIs) should be registered, if appropriate, withthe International Telecommunication Union in accordance with established procedures.7 All Inmarsat equipment should be registered with Inmarsat.8 Registration databases should include the following information, noting that the data elements listed are notnecessarily those maintained by the radio licensing authority and that not all of the following entries need to benotified to the ITU as long as the national database is identified and is accessible 24 hours per day: .1 ship name; .2 Maritime Mobile Service Identity (MMSI); .3 radio call sign; .4 EPIRB identification code (if applicable) and its homing frequency; .5 country (ship flag State; may be derived from MMSI and call sign); .6 ship identification number (IMO number or national registration number); .7 brief ship description (type, gross tonnage, ship superstructure, deck colours, identifying marks, etc.); .8 name, address, telephone and (if applicable) telefax number of emergency contact person ashore; .9 alternative 24-hour emergency telephone number (alternate contact ashore); .10 capacity for persons on board (passengers and crew); .11 radio installations (Inmarsat-A, -B, -C, -M, VHF DSC, etc.) for ship and survival craft; .12 identification numbers for all radio systems available; .13 type and number of survival craft; and .14 date of last modification of database record.9 For 406 MHz satellite emergency position indicating radiobeacons (EPIRBs), the country of registrationshould be coded in accordance with one of the following principles: .1 if the registration database is maintained by the ship’s flag State, use the Maritime Identification Digits (MID) of the flag State; .2 if the registration database is not maintained by the ship’s flag State, use: .2.1 the MID of the flag State, and inform all concerned where the unique database containing its registry of 406 MHz satellite EPIRBs is located; or .2.2 serialized protocol with the MID of the country which is maintaining the database.10 The data record of ships to which SOLAS chapter IV applies should be reviewed, and the database in-formation should be updated annually. Other ships should be encouraged to update their data records annually orat least every other year.11 Authorities maintaining or using databases should ensure that information described in paragraphs 8.4, 8.8,8.9 and 8.12 above supplied for GMDSS equipment registration is used only by appropriate recognized SARauthorities.12 Every State should: .1 maintain a suitable national database, or co-ordinate with other States of their geographical area to maintain a joint database; and additionally, .2 for ships which are using GMDSS frequencies and techniques or which are sailing internationally, ensure that the data records of these ships are notified to an international database (e.g. updated ITU database).
  • Annex 2-18 – Page 3 GMDSS Handbook13 States should also: .1 promulgate clear and timely guidance to manufacturers, agents and users on the appropriate coding, registration and updating procedures; .2 co-operate closely with other States, manufacturers, owners and organizations to help resolve any registration or information-retrieval problems that may arise; .3 formalize co-operative arrangements between the parties concerned for the maintenance of the joint database; .4 encourage manufacturers and distributors to advise customers, upon purchase of GMDSS equipment, about registration requirements, and refer unresolved coding and registration issues to proper national authorities for resolution; and .5 encourage manufacturers and distributors to educate users about the maintenance of GMDSS equipment.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-19 – Page 1 Annex 2-19 Resolution A.888(21) (Adopted on 25 November 1999) CRITERIA FOR THE PROVISION OF MOBILE-SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS IN THE GLOBAL MARITIME DISTRESS AND SAFETY SYSTEM (GMDSS)THE ASSEMBLY,RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention of the International Maritime Organization concerning the func-tions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety,RECALLING ALSO that regulation IV/5 of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS),1974, as amended in 1988, requires each Contracting Government to undertake to make available, eitherindividually or in co-operation with other Contracting Governments, as they may deem practical and necessary,appropriate shore-based facilities for space and terrestrial radiocommunication services having due regard to therecommendations of the Organization,TAKING INTO ACCOUNT resolution 322 (Rev. Mob-87) of the World Administrative Radio Conference,1987, relating to coast stations and coast earth stations assuming watchkeeping responsibilities on certainfrequencies in connection with the implementation of distress and safety communications for the GMDSS,TAKING INTO ACCOUNT ALSO resolution 3, Recommendation on the Early Introduction of the GlobalMaritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Elements, adopted by the 1988 SOLAS Conference introducingthe GMDSS,NOTING resolution A.801(19) on the Provision of radio services for the GMDSS,NOTING ALSO developments within the field of mobile-satellite communications,NOTING FURTHER that future mobile-satellite communication systems might have the potential to offermaritime distress and safety communications,CONSIDERING that mobile-satellite communication systems for use in the GMDSS should fulfil performancecriteria adopted by the Organization,RECOGNIZING that the Inmarsat system at present is the only mobile-satellite communication system re-cognized by SOLAS Contracting Governments for use in the GMDSS,RECOGNIZING ALSO the need for the Organization to have in place criteria against which to evaluate thecapabilities and performance of mobile-satellite communication systems, as may be notified to the Organizationby Governments for possible recognition for use in the GMDSS,1. ADOPTS the Criteria for the Provision of Mobile-Satellite Communication Systems in the GMDSS set outin the annex to the present resolution;2. INVITES Governments, when permitting ships flying their countries’ flag to carry equipment which canutilize recognized regional satellite systems on a national or regional basis, to apply the criteria set out in sections 2to 5 of the annex;
  • Annex 2-19 – Page 2 GMDSS Handbook3. REQUESTS the Maritime Safety Committee to: (a) apply the criteria set out in the annex to the present resolution, in particular the procedure set out in section 1 of the annex, when evaluating mobile-satellite communication systems notified by Gov- ernments for possible recognition for use in the GMDSS, and to consider, in connection with decisions thereon, the provisions of relevant regulations of SOLAS chapter IV; (b) ensure that, for mobile-satellite communication systems to be recognized by the Organization for use in the GMDSS, they should be compatible with appropriate SOLAS requirements, and also that any such recognition should not result in substantial changes having to be made to existing procedures and equipment performance standards; and (c) keep this resolution under review and take appropriate action as necessary to secure the long-term integrity of the GMDSS. Annex CRITERIA FOR THE PROVISION OF MOBILE-SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS IN THE GLOBAL MARITIME DISTRESS AND SAFETY SYSTEM (GMDSS)1 GENERAL1.1 Mobile-satellite communication systems presented to the Organization for evaluation and possible re-cognition as a radio system providing the maritime distress and safety satellite communication capabilities ne-cessary for use in the GMDSS should be notified to the Organization by Governments, either individually or inco-operation with other Governments. The Governments concerned should make available to the Organizationall necessary information relevant to the criteria indicated below, including proof of availability obtained in themobile-satellite system concerned.1.2 Governments desiring, individually or in co-operation with other Governments within a specific SAR area,to provide coast earth station facilities for serving the GMDSS in particular areas as part of a recognized systemshould notify the Organization as to the extent of continuous coverage and the extent of coverage from shore.This information should be determined by Governments in accordance with the criteria indicated below.1.3 Governments proposing such mobile-satellite communication systems for possible recognition and use inthe GMDSS should ensure that: .1 these mobile-satellite communication systems conform with the criteria specified in this annex; .2 only those systems are notified to the Organization for evaluation and possible recognition for use in the GMDSS; and .3 the provisions of resolution A.707(17) on Charges for distress, urgency and safety messages through the Inmarsat system are complied with.1.4 Notifications of mobile-satellite communication systems proposed for evaluation and possible recognitionfor use in the GMDSS should be evaluated by the Maritime Safety Committee relative to the criteria specified inthis annex. Based on the results of the detailed evaluation, the Maritime Safety Committee will decide asappropriate, taking into account the provisions of the relevant regulations of chapter IV of the 1974 SOLASConvention, as amended.1.5 Governments providing mobile-satellite communication systems recognized by the Organization for use inthe GMDSS should, either individually or in co-operation with other Governments, ensure that these systemscontinue to conform to the criteria specified in this annex and should, at least once a year, make available to theOrganization for evaluation a report on the availability and performance obtained during the period since thepreceding report in accordance with section 3.5.2 of the criteria indicated below. The Maritime Safety Com-mittee should evaluate such reports relative to the criteria specified in this annex and take action as appropriate.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-19 – Page 31.6 The Organization should include and maintain in the GMDSS Master Plan details of all areas covered bymobile-satellite communication systems recognized for use in the GMDSS and of all areas covered by individualcoast earth stations operating in those systems recognized as serving the GMDSS. The Organization shouldperiodically circulate an updated copy of the description of these systems and areas to Governments.2 DEFINITIONS2.1 Satellite systemThe satellite system means the space segment, the arrangements for controlling the space segment and the networkcontrol facilities controlling the access to the space segment.2.2 Coverage areaThe coverage area of the satellite system is the geographical area within which the satellite system provides anavailability in accordance with the criteria stated in section 3.5 in the ship-to-shore and shore-to-ship directions,and within which continuous alerting is available. This should be described in relation to any of the sea areas asdefined in the SOLAS Convention, i.e. sea area A4 is an area outside sea areas A1, A2 and A3; sea area A3 iswithin the coverage of an Inmarsat geostationary satellite in which continuous alerting is available, excluding seaareas A1 and A2; sea area A2 is within the radiotelephone coverage of at least one MF coast station in whichcontinuous DSC alerting is available; and sea area A1 is within the radiotelephone coverage of at least one VHFcoast station in which continuous DSC alerting is available.2.3 Availability2.3.1 The availability of a communication system is defined as the percentage of time in which the system isavailable for access to and communications through the system, i.e.: ðscheduled operating timeÞ À ðdowntimeÞ A¼ 6100% ðscheduled operating timeÞ2.3.2 Definitions and calculations of availabilities of communications circuits in the Maritime Mobile-SatelliteService are given in ITU-R M.828-1.3 CRITERIA AND REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MOBILE-SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM3.1 Functional requirements*3.1.1 Mobile-satellite communication systems for maritime distress and safety communication services andforming part of the GMDSS radio systems specified in chapter IV, regulation 5 of the 1974 SOLAS Convention,as amended, should be capable of processing at least the following maritime distress and safety communications: .1 ship-to-shore distress alerts/calls; .2 shore-to-ship distress relay alerts/calls; .3 ship-to-shore, shore-to-ship and ship-to-ship search and rescue co-ordinating communications; .4 ship-to-shore transmissions of maritime safety information; and shore-to-ship broadcast of maritime safety information; and .5 ship-to-shore, shore-to-ship, and ship-to-ship general communications.* – Resolution A.801(19) ‘‘Provision of radio services for the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS)’’, annex 5 ‘‘Criteria for use whenproviding Inmarsat shore-based facilities for use in the GMDSS’’;– Resolution A.887(21) ‘‘Establishment, updating and retrieval of the information contained in the registration databases for the global maritimedistress and safety system (GMDSS)’’;– Resolution A.694(17) ‘‘General requirements for shipborne radio equipment forming part of the global maritime distress and safety system(GMDSS) and for electronic navigational aids’’;– IMO International SafetyNET Manual;– Resolution A.664(16) ‘‘Performance standards for enhanced group call equipment’’ and– appropriate IEC Standards and ITU Recommendations.
  • Annex 2-19 – Page 4 GMDSS Handbook3.2 CapacityThe satellite system should be designed for and should provide adequate channel and power capacity for pro-cessing effectively, and with an availability as stated in section 3.5, the maritime distress, urgency, safety andgeneral communication traffic estimated to be required by the ships using the system.3.3 Priority access3.3.1 Although current systems can recognize more levels, the capability is not implemented in all coast earthstations. In any case, distress alerts and distress calls should be given priority treatment by providing immediateaccess to satellite channels and, for store-and-forward systems, should be placed ahead of all routine traffic. Anysystem currently being designed for use in the GMDSS after 1 February 1999 should be able to recognize the fourlevels of priority as described below: .1 Mobile-satellite communication systems and coast earth stations used for providing other mobile- satellite communications in addition to maritime communications should be capable of automatically recognizing requests for maritime communications from: – ship earth stations; and – recognized entities of importance for safety at sea, such as MRCCs, hydrographic and meteor- ological offices, medical centres, etc., registered with the coast earth station. The system should process such maritime communications in the ship-to-shore and shore-to-ship directions for levels 1 to 3 with priority over other communications. .2 The satellite system and the coast earth stations should be capable of processing maritime distress, urgency, safety and routine communications in accordance with the message priority as defined by the ITU Radio Regulations. The order of processing these communications should be: .1 distress; .2 urgency; .3 safety; and .4 other communications. .3 In processing maritime distress, urgency, safety and routine communications, the satellite system and the coast earth stations should be capable of: .1 automatically recognizing the message or access priority for ship-to-shore communications; .2 automatically recognizing the message or access priority for shore-to-ship communications from, as a minimum, recognized entities of importance for safety at sea, registered by the coast earth station; .3 preserving and transferring the priority; .4 giving distress alerts and distress messages immediate access, if necessary by pre-emption of on- going communications of level 4; .5 automatically recognizing maritime distress communications, and of routeing automatically maritime distress alerts/messages directly to the associated MRCC or responsible RCC, if this capability exists; and .6 processing maritime urgency and safety communications in the ship-to-shore and shore-to-ship directions with adequate priority, for example by allocating the first vacant channel, if no channel is immediately available. .4 Selection and use of message or access priority for urgency and safety transmissions by ship earth stations should preferably be automatic and should be restricted to calls to special, recognized entities such as medical centres, maritime assistance, hydrographic and meteorological offices, etc., as defined for the coast earth station. The coast earth station should automatically route such calls directly to the relevant entity.3.4 Coverage area3.4.1 Documentation on the coverage area of the satellite system, as defined in section 2.2, should be forwardedto the Organization.
  • GMDSS Handbook Annex 2-19 – Page 53.4.2 Information on coverage areas for satellite systems accepted by the Organization, as forming part of theGMDSS, should be published by the Organization in the GMDSS Master Plan.3.5 Availability3.5.1 The satellite system should provide continuous availability for maritime distress and safety communica-tions in the ship-to-shore and shore-to-ship directions.3.5.2 The availability of the space segment, provision of spare satellite capacity and the network control function(i.e. the network availability), as defined in section 2.3 above, should be continuously monitored, and reports onthe recorded availability of the system should be given to the Organization at least once every year. Serviceproviders should be obligated to advise the Organization and RCCs of planned outages and advise ships ofscheduled downtime and known interruptions in service and any other relevant network information.3.6 Network availabilityThe following minimum values of availability are recommended for the complete mobile-satellite commu-nication network, including coast earth stations: .1 for ship-to-shore distress priority alerts calls: 99.9%; and .2 for other maritime communications in ship-to-shore and shore-to-ship directions: 99%.3.7 Restoration and spare satellites3.7.1 Spare satellite capacity and arrangements prepared in advance should be provided for ensuring, in theevent of a partial or total satellite failure, restoration of the maritime distress and safety communication services inthe area concerned to their normal availability, within no more than one hour after the event of a satellite failure.3.7.2 Adequate information on the means and arrangements prepared for restoration of the maritime distressand safety communication services in the event of a satellite failure should be notified to the Organization.3.8 IdentificationThe satellite system should be capable of automatically recognizing and preserving the identification of maritimemobile earth stations.3.9 Information to be made available to SAR authoritiesFor all distress, urgency and safety communications, the Mobile Earth Station Identification Number or MaritimeMobile Service Identity should be an integral part of the distress alert and provided to the RCC with the alert.When available, all additional registration, commissioning or other data relevant to the search and rescue orprosecution of false alert should be referenced to this number and made available to the proper SAR authority orRCC upon request.3.10 Reception of distress alertsThe satellite system should allow for addressing a maritime distress alert to a specific coast earth station chosen bythe ship’s operator and covering the area concerned, but should also provide for automatic routeing of manuallyinitiated response to maritime distress alerts even if no specific CES is selected.3.11 Control of ship earth stationsAccess-control arrangements for controlling and giving, or temporarily rejecting, access for ship earth stations tothe system should at any time allow ship earth stations access for transmission of maritime distress alerts/calls anddistress messages.3.12 Test facilitiesThe system should provide facilities making it possible for ship earth stations to test the distress capability of theirstations without initiating a distress alert/call.
  • Annex 2-19 – Page 6 GMDSS Handbook4 CRITERIA AND REQUIREMENTS FOR COAST EARTH STATIONS4.1 Functional requirements4.1.1 Coast earth stations serving the GMDSS should: .1 be in continuous operation; .2 be connected to an associated RCC; .3 keep continuous watch on appropriate satellite communication channels; and .4 be capable of transmission and reception of at least the following maritime distress and safety com- munications: .4.1 ship-to-shore distress alerts/calls; .4.2 shore-to-ship distress relay alerts/calls; .4.3 ship-to-shore, ship-to-ship and shore-to-ship search and rescue co-ordinating communications; .4.4 ship-to-shore and shore-to-ship transmissions of Maritime Safety Information; and .4.5 ship-to-shore, ship-to-ship and shore-to-ship general communications. Note: Coast earth stations operating in the Inmarsat-C system should be capable of transmission of Mar- itime Safety Information in the shore-to-ship direction via the Inmarsat SafetyNET service.4.2 Priority4.2.1 The coast earth station should be capable of automatically recognizing the priority of ship-to-shore andshore-to-ship communications, and should preserve the priority and process maritime mobile communicationsfor the following four levels of priority: .1 distress; .2 urgency; .3 safety; and .4 other communications.4.2.2 Priority access should be given for distress alerts and calls in real time. Although the current system canrecognize more than two levels