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Stage 1 Year 2English Program  Semester 1    Term 1  Year 2 2010
English Stage 1 Overview                                           Foundation Statement Stage 1                           ...
Subject Overview             English is taught by the classroom teacher for 8 hours per week. It is taught in the followin...
Overview of Language and Language Learning
Response Week 1 - 5                                               General Features of a ResponseSocial PurposeResponses ar...
Teaching Notes          The focus in Stage 1 is on the personal response given orally. Students express a personal opinion...
ESL Teaching Notes ResponseESL students will need to have a high degree of familiarity with literary texts in order to res...
ESL Scales levels: Oral Interaction 3, 4, 5* Model the use of ‘when’ and ‘because’ when responding to a text, eg I liked t...
Outcomes & Indicators         Reading Outcomes                     Talking and Listening Outcomes                         ...
Exposition Week 6 - 10                                                 General Features of ExpositionSocial PurposeExposit...
Teaching Notes: Stage 1In Stage 1, students will still be dealing mainly with topics of interest or familiarity within the...
* Constructing a sentence for the position statement.* Using some connectives, eg firstly, secondly.* Using action, relati...
ESL Teaching Notes: ExpositionPersuasive text types require the use of complex English language structures to express and ...
Reading and Writing Teaching points to considerESL Scales levels: Beginning Reading and Responding 1, 2, 3                ...
Outcomes and Indicators        Reading Outcomes                    Talking and Listening Outcomes                         ...
Stage 1 Teaching Focus                                                                   WritingTeachers need to make expl...
Talking & Listening   Outcome TS1.1 Communicates with an increasing range of people for a variety of purposes on both fami...
Learning to Talk and Listen — Skills and StrategiesOutcome TS1.2 Interacts in more extended ways with less teacher interve...
Learning About Talking and Listening — Context and TextOutcome TS1.3 Recognises a range of purposes and audiences for spok...
Learning About Talking and Listening — Language Structures and FeaturesOutcome TS1.4 Recognises that different types of pr...
Forms of Assessments                                                           Assessment                                 ...
Talking & Listening     Term 1
Content      ESL Scales                  Teaching and Learning Activities          Modifications       Resources          ...
T&L: TS1.1   Oral Interaction   Topic Talk             levels 3/4/5T&L: TS1.2                      Each student writes dow...
Content      ESL Scales                Teaching and Learning Activities              Modifications      Resources         ...
T&L: TS1.1   Oral Interaction   Oral Presentation             levels 3/4/5T&L: TS1.2                      The students are...
SpellingTerm 1
Content                             Teaching and learning activities                          Additional   Resourc   Evalu...
Spelling Race                    1. Divide the class into two teams. 2. On the board, write Team 1 and Team 2 (or the name...
Word Searches or Crossword Puzzles   Using a software or Puzzlemaker from Discovery.com, create wordsearches and puzzles f...
**** The poems are created together as a class for the first few months. Afterwards, if the students are ready, they can t...
4. After the students finish the list, they switch roles and the first       student does the spelling while the second do...
Spelling TrainRead a spelling word aloud and have the students write it down. Using thelast letter in that word, students ...
Spelling Words Term 1Week 1     Week 2    Week 3                  Week 4   Week 5Shell      Drab      Grab                ...
Text Type      Term 1Response Week 1 - 5
Content          ESL Scales             Teaching and Learning Activities             Modifications       Resources        ...
Week 2T&L: TS1.1                              Activity 3:                                            Paper for drawingExpr...
Reading: RS1.5   Week 3                                                 Premier’s Reading                                 ...
T&L: TS1.1                         Activity 7:                                   In small groups, students discuss a book ...
Writing: WS1.10   Week 5                                                  Writing books                  Activity 9:Have s...
Handwriting  Term 1Week 1 - 5
Content           ESL Scales            Teaching and Learning Activities   Additional       Resources                     ...
Week 3                          Date                          a A a A a A                          Alice ate all the      ...
Text Type       Term 1Exposition Week 6 - 10
Content         ESL Scales              Teaching and Learning Activities                  Modifications   Resources       ...
Oral Interaction   • Model sentences that use causal connectives, eg I                                like dogs because … ...
Content   ESL Scales             Teaching and Learning Activities                 Modifications       Resources           ...
T&L: TS1.1                  Week 8 Activities                  • Read the position statement of an exposition that        ...
Content       ESL Scales                Teaching and Learning Activities           Modifications       Resources          ...
Week 10 ActivitiesReading: RS1.5   • Focus on the social purpose of expositions by        Display paper                 jo...
Content       ESL Scales             Teaching and Learning Activities              Modifications       Resources          ...
Handwriting  Term 1Week 6 - 10
Content       ESL Scales            Teaching and Learning Activities   Modifications       Resources                      ...
Week 8Date                    c C c C c C                    Could you please call                    the children?Handwri...
Term 1 Weekly Overview Learning Experience
English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 2               Talking & Listening                                           ...
English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 3               Talking & Listening                                           ...
English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 4               Talking & Listening                                           ...
English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 5                  Talking & Listening                                        ...
English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 6               Talking & Listening                                           ...
English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 7           Talking & Listening                                               ...
English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 8              Talking & Listening                                            ...
English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 9             Talking & Listening                                             ...
English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 10             Talking & Listening                                            ...
Erika Rimes Stage 1 English Program
Erika Rimes Stage 1 English Program
Erika Rimes Stage 1 English Program
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Transcript of "Erika Rimes Stage 1 English Program"

  1. 1. Stage 1 Year 2English Program Semester 1 Term 1 Year 2 2010
  2. 2. English Stage 1 Overview Foundation Statement Stage 1 Talking and Listening ■ Reading ■ WritingStudents communicate with a wide range of people on familiar and introduced topics to achieve a variety of purposes. They interacteffectively, adopting new speaking skills, in order to give confident oral presentations.They listen to instructions and share ideas with peers to complete tasks. Students recognise that spoken language has a range of purposes andaudiences and use this knowledge when attempting to communicate effectively with others. They investigate the different types andorganisational patterns of common spoken texts and recognise features within them.Students read and view short literary and factual texts, using an increasing variety of skills and strategies including context, grammar, wordusage and phonics to make connections between their own experiences and information in texts. Students read, interpret and discuss texts,including visual and multimedia texts, using a range of skills and strategies. They explore and identify ways texts differ according to purpose,audience and subject and understand that people produce texts. Students recognise the basic structure and grammatical features of a limitedrange of text types.Students write simple literary and factual texts on familiar topics for known readers by planning and reviewing their writing. They write usingbasic grammatical features and conventions of punctuation, showing awareness of different purposes, audiences and subject matter. Studentsspell using knowledge of sight words, letter-sound correspondence and other strategies. They write using letters of consistent size and slope inNSW Foundation Style and use computer technology to produce texts, recognising simple conventions, language and functions.
  3. 3. Subject Overview English is taught by the classroom teacher for 8 hours per week. It is taught in the following format:Independent Reading: students have dedicated quiet reading time 10 - 15 minutes a day as well and other opportunities inother areas of literacyGuided Reading: Students are arranged in abilities groups based on running record assessments. Each group gets 2 x 20 minutessessions per week with the teacher. Comprehension activities are designated to each group which they complete after readingwith teacher.Modelled Reading: Students are exposed to correct models of text types which forms the focus for further discussion and jointconstructions.Guided Writing: As a class the students will construct the text type being studiesIndependent Writing: after joint construction, students will then be given the opportunity to independently construct the texttype being studied.Spelling: Students engage in a spelling lesson daily 20minutes with a variety of activities focusing on the four spelling knowledge;VISUAL KNOWLEDGE, PHONOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE, MORPHOMIC KNOWLEDGE & ETYMOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE
  4. 4. Overview of Language and Language Learning
  5. 5. Response Week 1 - 5 General Features of a ResponseSocial PurposeResponses are used to summarise, analyse and respond to literary texts. They may be a personal response or a review.Structure (Personal Response)* Context — this gives background information on the text.* Opinion/Reaction — this explores the qualities and effectiveness of the text, expressing personal feelings.Structure (Review)* Context — this gives background information, eg author, type of work, setting and brief synopsis.* Text description — this describes the main characters and the pattern of their relationships. It also deals with some key incidentsselected because they may give further insight into characters and the theme of the text.* Judgement — this is where the writer or speaker evaluates the work by giving an opinion or making a recommendation.GrammarCommon grammatical patterns in review texts include:* relating verbs, action verbs, saying verbs, thinking verbs, noun groups describing characters;* present tense — changes to past tense if text has a historical setting;* temporal sequence of events when key events are summarised;* persuasive language used in judgement;* clause or sentence themes that are often the title of the book, name of author etc. These choices clearly locate the reader in aresponse text.Note: Students are encouraged to speak and write personal responses in Stage 1.Links with Other Key Learning AreasCreative and Practical Arts - Response texts are important in CAPA where students are asked to respond to dramatic performances,works of art and music.
  6. 6. Teaching Notes The focus in Stage 1 is on the personal response given orally. Students express a personal opinion about shared texts. Students should be encouraged to use language about books and films. Teachers should build this knowledge carefully when discussingtexts, eg author, title, events and characters. Encourage students to talk about the text structure of books and films using terms such as orientation, complication, resolution. Allow time for students to talk about books both formally and informally with peers and teacher, and model oral and written ways of responding to texts.StructureStudents should be encouraged to develop a brief context stage and an opinion stage, eg ‘I like this book because …’ Provideopportunities for students to express feelings and attitudes linking their own personal experiences to characters and events in texts.ContentContent will be related to texts read and viewed during shared and guided reading. Use proformas and guideline questions to assiststudents in structuring their responses.Grammar Focus* Using relating verbs, eg ‘This book is about …’.* Naming characters. * Usually using present tense. * Using temporal sequencing of events only in the text description whensummarising key events. * Using evaluative language in judgement stage. * Giving information in the beginning focus of clauses andsentences, eg title of book, author.Grammar TerminologyStudents at this stage will be using terms such as:* sentence; * naming word/noun/proper noun/noun group; * relating verb, action verb; * describing word/adjective; * adverb, adverbialphrase.Spoken Responses These will be mainly personal responses to literary texts heard, read and viewed. Teachers will need to guide oralresponse either by direct modelling or with questions. Reviews at this stage will be jointly constructed.Written Responses Students will jointly and independently construct written personal responses. Reviews at this stage will be jointlyconstructed.
  7. 7. ESL Teaching Notes ResponseESL students will need to have a high degree of familiarity with literary texts in order to respond to them effectively. Therefore,teachers need to have engaged their students in focused studies of a range of narratives and poetry before introducing the notion of aresponse.ESL students are focusing their attention on the meaning of the text. Response requires personal opinion and justification that drawson a wider vocabulary. The ability to respond to open-ended questions of Why? and How? is particularly difficult for the ESL learner.Students working at about level 4 in the ESL scales are beginning to use English to express opinions about literature and start todescribe literary features.It is essential that the text an ESL student is being asked to respond to is fully understood by that student and that the text is at anappropriate reading level. Ensure that the vocabulary and content of the text have been studied. ESL students are able to successfullyrespond to texts when supported by model texts with sentence beginnings and by discussion at the student’s instructional level.Talking and Listening Teaching points to considerESL Scales levels: Oral Interaction 1, 2* Opinions about a text can only be asked about texts the student knows well.* Simple questions requiring short answers may be manageable, eg; Did you like the story? Did you like the wolf? Did you like Red RidingHood? ‘I liked the grandma. I didn’t like the wolf’.* Sort characters from a known narrative into two categories, eg like/don’t like.
  8. 8. ESL Scales levels: Oral Interaction 3, 4, 5* Model the use of ‘when’ and ‘because’ when responding to a text, eg I liked the little bear when he fell off his chair. I liked the witchbecause she can fly.* Teach only a few features of a book at a time and give many opportunities for these to be reinforced, eg characters, setting, plot.* When asking students to retell a story, provide picture support to help trigger vocabulary and to support sequencing of events.* Introduce summarising skills in the simplest forms, eg listing the characters — The book Little Red Riding Hood is about a girl, a wolfand a grandma.* Plot ‘feeling’ words (related to emotions felt when listening to a poem) on a horizontal line. Draw pictures that match the words andplace under the words.Reading & Writing Teaching points to considerESL Scales levels: Beginning Reading and Responding 1, 2, 3Reading and Responding 1Beginning Writing 1, 2, 3Writing 1* Simple oral responses as detailed above are sufficient at these levels.ESL Scales levels Reading and Responding 2, 3Writing 2, 3* Ensure that writing activities use the same language patterns that have been modelled in talking and listening activities, eg I liked thebear when …* Invite a student to select three known texts, place them in order of preference, and select cards saying ‘best’, ‘second best’, ‘thirdbest’. If the student offers some reason for their choice, model the language the student has used to scribe a sentence, eg studentoffers ‘funny grandma’ — teacher scribes ‘I like this book best because of the funny grandma’.
  9. 9. Outcomes & Indicators Reading Outcomes Talking and Listening Outcomes Writing OutcomesRS1.5 Reads a wider range of texts on TS1.1 Communicates with an increasing WS1.9 Plans, reviews and produces a small range of simple literary and factualless familiar topics with increasing range of people for a variety of purposes texts for a variety of purposes on familiar topics for known readers.independence and understanding, making on both familiar and introduced topics in WS1.10 Produces texts using the basic grammatical features and punctuationconnections between own knowledge and spontaneous and structured classroom conventions of the text type.experience and information in texts. activities. WS1.11 Uses knowledge of sight words and letter–sound correspondences, andRS1.6 Draws on an increasing range of TS1.2 Interacts in more extended ways a variety of strategies to spell familiar words.skills and strategies when reading and with less teacher intervention, makes WS1.12 Produces texts using letters of consistent size and slope in NSWcomprehending texts. increasingly confident oral presentations Foundation Style and using computer technology.RS1.7 Understands that texts are and generally listens attentively. WS1.13 Identifies how own texts differ according to their purpose, audienceconstructed by people and identifies way TS1.3 Recognises a range of purposes and subject matter.in which texts differ according to their and audiences for spoken language and WS1.14 Identifies the structure of own literary and factual texts and namespurpose, audience and subject matter. considers how own talking and listening a limited range of related grammatical features and conventions of writtenRS1.8 Identifies the text structure and are adjusted in different situations. language.basic grammatical features of a limited TS1.4 Recognises that different typesrange of text types. of predictable spoken texts have Indicators different organisational patterns and • writes a short response or review containing basic description with commentIndicators features. or opinion• describes the purpose of organisational • discusses some of the different purposes for which people write responses orstages in narrative texts Indicators reviews• predicts from the cover and title the • responds to stories and poems read • expresses an opinion in writingtarget audience of a text aloud • uses drawings to accompany text where relevant• retells and comments on incidents from • identifies main ideas of text • uses adjectives to provide more information about nounsa children’s storybook or a short • expresses a personal point of view • reads own writing aloud and makes some corrections to clarify meaning.children’s film, paying attention to plot • listens to a point of viewelements such as setting, character, • plans delivery of presentations andconflict and resolution role-plays.• expresses an opinion about acharacter’s actions and speculates ontheir own behaviour in a similar situation.
  10. 10. Exposition Week 6 - 10 General Features of ExpositionSocial PurposeExpositions are used to argue a case for or against a particular position or point of view.StructureExpositions are organised to include a ‘statement of position’, ‘arguments’ and a ‘reinforcement of position statement’. The number ofarguments may vary in expositions. The statement of position stage usually includes a ‘preview of arguments’. Each argument stageconsists of a ‘point’ and ‘elaboration’. In the elaboration, the argument is supported by evidence. Arguments are ordered according tothe writer’s choice, usually according to criteria of strong and weak arguments. The reinforcement of the statement of positionrestates the position more forcefully in the light of the arguments presented.GrammarCommon grammatical patterns in exposition include:* general nouns, eg ears, zoos; * abstract nouns, eg policy, government; * technical words, eg species of animals;* relating verbs, eg It is important …;* action verbs, eg We must save …; * thinking verbs, eg Many people believe …;* modal verbs, eg We must preserve …;* modal adverbs, eg Certainly we must try …;* connectives, eg firstly, secondly …;* evaluative language, eg important, significant, valuable.
  11. 11. Teaching Notes: Stage 1In Stage 1, students will still be dealing mainly with topics of interest or familiarity within their local community. Students should beencouraged to nominate such issues and discuss them. The teacher needs to model spoken and written expositions and to locateappropriate expositions for students to listen to and read. The teacher may need to write model expositions.StructureThe meaning of terms such as ‘statement of position’ should be discussed with students. Students should focus on giving a statement ofposition and should practise different choices for making it as strong a statement as possible. Students should focus on developing theargument stages, if possible, and on the final stage — reinforcement of statement of position.ContentStudents may still draw on issues to do with school and the local community but also on topics related to the curriculum, eg Shouldpeople protect nature and wildlife? The teacher should discuss with the class the kind of information needed to develop strongargument stages to support their position statement. Where the information can be located should also be discussed. Some informationfrom written texts and spoken texts can be recorded in point form on the board, on a wall chart, and on individual pro formas. Thisinformation provides the basis for jointly or independently constructed texts.Links with Other Key Learning AreasExpositions can be written in all key learning areas. For example:* Human Society and Its Environment: identify a transport system in the local community and outline the different views on itsadvantages for the local community.Grammar Focus
  12. 12. * Constructing a sentence for the position statement.* Using some connectives, eg firstly, secondly.* Using action, relating and thinking verbs, eg Koalas eat leaves; They are Australian animals;Many people like koalas.* Using adverbs, adverbial phrases, eg Koalas sleep in trees; they climb slowly.* Naming technical terms where appropriate and demonstrating understanding of their meaning, eg Animals’ habitats are where theylive safely and get food and water.Grammar TerminologyStudents at this stage will be using terms such as:* connective* sentence* verb — doing, thinking, relating* adverb* adverbial phrase.Spoken ExpositionsTeachers need to model spoken expositions for students. Spoken expositions may still be jointly constructed by students working inpairs or small groups. They may be supported by diagrams, photographs and other visual images. Students need to be able to presentsupporting information to develop arguments convincingly. They should be given opportunities to practise their presentations. Studentsneed to consider who their audience is for spoken expositions and develop the presentation accordingly. The teacher should help themto develop such strategies as varying the softness and loudness of voice and using hand gestures to gain the attention and interest oftheir audience.Written ExpositionsWritten expositions may be jointly or independently constructed. Students need to learn to locate information in written texts, film orvideos, which can be used to develop effective argument stages. Students need to consider the audience they wish to influence. If theaudience is a community one, they may write their expositions in a letter. This will involve them in learning the conventions of letterwriting. Students’ expositions can provide models for future writing by them and other classes.
  13. 13. ESL Teaching Notes: ExpositionPersuasive text types require the use of complex English language structures to express and justify opinion. This is challenging andlinguistically demanding for early ESL students. In many cultures it is not appropriate to express opinion in a school context, so thisform of expression needs to be explicitly encouraged. It is advisable to begin to explore persuasive text types through school-basedcontexts.Talking and Listening Teaching points to considerESL Scales levels: Oral Interaction 1, 2* Introduce and model the sentence structure ‘I like’ and ‘I don’t like’ in response to ‘Do you like …?’, ‘Does she like …?’ etc. Limit thisquestion to highly contextualised situations.* Modality can be challenging for ESL learners, eg the canteen should sell fruit.* Ask questions that have a yes/no answer as a starting point, eg Should children wear hats?ESL Scales levels: Oral Interaction 3, 4, 5* Ask students to stand on either side of the room in response to questions where they arerequired to express an opinion. Provide visual support related to the question — both when* Model sentences that use causal connectives, eg I like dogs because … Break the sentencesinto separate messages and make links between messages.
  14. 14. Reading and Writing Teaching points to considerESL Scales levels: Beginning Reading and Responding 1, 2, 3 Reading and Responding 1 Beginning Writing 1, 2, 3 Writing 1* Build on oral discussion of ‘I like …’ and ‘I don’t like …’. Students construct a chart usingpictures of items or words, and use it as a basis for an oral presentation of their likes and dislikes.* Choose issues related to the topic to be discussed. Reframe the issue so that students can providetheir input with short answers, eg The canteen can sell apples or lollies. Who will buyapples?* Fill in a picture matrix of what other students like and don’t like.ESL Scales levels: Reading and Responding 2, 3 Writing 2, 3* Provide sentence stems including causal connectives for students to complete. * Many learning experiences in the modules are relevant but must be based on familiar topics where field knowledge is well developed.
  15. 15. Outcomes and Indicators Reading Outcomes Talking and Listening Outcomes Writing Outcomes RS1.5 TS1.1 WS1.9 Reads a wider range of texts on less Communicates with an increasing range Plans, reviews and produces a small range of simple literary and familiar topics with increasing of people for a variety of purposes on factual texts for a variety of purposes on familiar topics forindependence and understanding, making both familiar and introduced topics in known readers.connections between own knowledge and spontaneous and structured classroom WS1.10 experience and information in texts. activities. Produces texts using the basic grammatical features and RS1.6 TS1.2 punctuation conventions of the text type. Draws on an increasing range of skills Interacts in more extended ways with WS1.11 and strategies when reading and less teacher intervention, makes Uses knowledge of sight words and letter–sound comprehending texts. increasingly confident oral presentations correspondences, and a variety of strategies to spell familiar RS1.7 and generally listens attentively. words.Understands that texts are constructed TS1.3 WS1.12 by people and identifies way in which Recognises a range of purposes and Produces texts using letters of consistent size and slope in NSWtexts differ according to their purpose, audiences for spoken language and Foundation Style and using computer technology. audience and subject matter. considers how own talking and listening WS1.13 RS1.8 are adjusted in different situations. Identifies how own texts differ according to their purpose, Identifies the text structure and basic TS1.4 audience and subject matter.grammatical features of a limited range Recognises that different types of WS1.14 of text types. predictable spoken texts have different Identifies the structure of own literary and factual texts and Indicators organisational patterns and features. names a limited range of related grammatical features and • begins to recognise the purpose and Indicators conventions of written language.audience of an exposition viewed or read • identifies the opinion of the speaker • identifies and discusses opinions and presenting oral exposition Indicators information found in expositions, • experiments with gesture and facial • writes an opinion supported by at least one reason including advertisements expression to indicate emotions and • recognises and uses organisational structure of simple • begins to recognise point of view, and convey interest exposition say what the writer might think • expresses a personal point of view • writes simple expositions for different purposes • recognises connectives in printed • listens to a point of view. • discusses function of different parts or stages of a text texts. • recognises that connectives such as ‘if’, ‘because’ flag reasons, also ‘firstly’, ‘secondly’ etc.
  16. 16. Stage 1 Teaching Focus WritingTeachers need to make explicit and demonstrate ways of using the writing processes of:* planning and drafting; *redrafting and revising; *editing and proofreading;* reviewing and publishing. Joint Construction of TextsThe process of writing, from planning to publishing, can be taught through joint construction activities and conferencing. Jointconstruction activities provide opportunities for students to observe experienced writersdemonstrating:* how to preplan work, including the completion of a proforma chart; * how to select and organise information according to purpose,audience and situation; * the language structures and features of text types; * how to construct sentences using correct punctuation;* what to include or leave out and the flexibility to change or correct a language choice; * editing and proofreading strategies; * how tomake decisions about layout and inclusion of visual text. SpellingSpelling strategies that need to be taught in Stage 1 include:* matching sounds with words that contain that sound, for example;at, am, an, et, ag, en, ig, in, un, ug, og, op, ch, s, th, wh;* using knowledge of familiar letter patterns, for example, -ed, -ing, -s;* using a letter or letter combination to represent most syllables in words;* self-correcting words that do not look right when first written;* identifying possible spelling errors after completing writing;* using resources to find correct spelling, eg word banks, alphabet charts, junior dictionaries HandwritingTeachers should provide opportunities for students to:* write frequently, practising lower-case and upper-case letters, writing words and sentences and developing patterns related to theletter being practised. A suggested sequence is:o, a, d, g, q, e, c, i, j, l, t, f, h, m, n, k, r, b, p, u, y, x, z, s, v, w;* employ correct pencil grip and good posture;* pay attention to size, shape, slope and spacing of letters;
  17. 17. Talking & Listening Outcome TS1.1 Communicates with an increasing range of people for a variety of purposes on both familiar and introduced topics in spontaneous and structured classroom activities.Purpose• asks questions to seek clarification • joins in familiar rhymes, chants and poems from various cultures• gives a simple description of familiar people, places, things • listens to a range of different picture books read aloud, in differentlanguage varieties• follows and responds to an aural multimedia text, eg talking book • gives personal recounts about familiar events• provides a brief retelling of a familiar story • recounts real or imagined events in logical sequence• presents a biography of a family member to a group • follows a short procedure, eg instructions for a simple task• is able to give simple directions, eg to go to the next classroom/the library • listens to and follows a brief set of instructions• listens for information from a variety of sources • listens for and responds to information from a news event or classroom event• gives a brief, simple oral information report on familiar topics • understands a brief explanation of a simple phenomenon• uses a comment or a question to expand on an idea in a discussion • expresses a point of view about texts read, heard or viewed• participates in a class discussion about school rules • engages in group discussion to solve a problem.Audience, Subject Matter• greets other teachers appropriately and conveys messages to them • talks with parent helpers in the classroom• converses about a school topic, eg playground equipment, with teacher on duty • talks comfortably with peers on a variety of topics• interacts in informal conversations with peers and adults • listens attentively and converses with others to share ideas or giveinformation• retells partner’s news • talks about familiar, real and imagined topics • listens to and shows respect for the contribution of another ingroup and class discussions• plans and performs a role-play for the class.ESL ScalesTo achieve this outcome, students learning English as their second language will need to be developing English skills described at levels3/4 in the Oral Interaction strand of the ESL Scales.
  18. 18. Learning to Talk and Listen — Skills and StrategiesOutcome TS1.2 Interacts in more extended ways with less teacher intervention, makes increasingly confident oralpresentations and generally listens attentively. Listening Skills • is aware of how gesture and facial expression may show interest or lack of interest on the part of the listener in some cultures • as a listener, usually maintains eye contact, if culturally appropriate, with speaker • follows instructions on how to complete an activity. Interaction Skills • rephrases statements to increase their clarity • expresses a personal point of view and listens to the viewpoint of others • listens and contributes frequently to small-group interaction • initiates topics in group discussion • attempts to involve others in a discussion • listens and contributes to class discussions on various topics • uses turn-taking, questioning and other behaviours related to class discussions. Oral Presentation Skills • experiments with varying voice, tone, volume and pace to indicate emotions • speaks clearly and conveys meaning to peers • with prompting, varies rate and level of speech to aid listeners’ understanding • talks to whole class using a prop to guide talk, eg a picture of a farm, computer graphic • as a speaker, makes eye contact, if culturally appropriate, with audience. ESL Scales Levels 4/5 Oral Interaction
  19. 19. Learning About Talking and Listening — Context and TextOutcome TS1.3 Recognises a range of purposes and audiences for spoken language and considers how own talking and listening are adjusted in different situations. Purpose • recognises different oral text types such as conversation, telephone calls, radio advertisements • compares ways in which speech varies in different situations, eg canteen, playground, classroom, home, cultures • talks about the structure of some text types, eg simple procedure, spoken information report, personal recount • retells a narrative, showing emerging awareness of structure. Audience • differentiates between playground language and classroom language • talks about how to make positive statements • talks about how to make negative statements that will not offend the listener • uses a variety of greetings, introductions and farewells appropriate to the situation and cultural context • role-plays the difference between interacting with a friend and with an unfamiliar adult. Channel of Communication • compares different ways of using spoken language to communicate. Language Varieties • demonstrates recognition that there are different languages in the world • recognises different kinds of English: Australian, Aboriginal, British, American, Indian • recognises diversity of English and its use in different communities. ESL Scales Levels 4/5 Oral Interaction
  20. 20. Learning About Talking and Listening — Language Structures and FeaturesOutcome TS1.4 Recognises that different types of predictable spoken texts have different organisational patterns and features. Text Structure and Features • differentiates between the purposes of different radio programs, eg a talkback show and a football game • talks about the sequence of ideas in speech • talks about turn-taking in conversations • explains the importance of an orientation stage in an oral recount • uses ‘um’ and ‘ah’ for pause and emphasis. Grammar • talks about using verbs in procedures, eg the action words that tell what to do • talks about using describing words (adjectives) in descriptions • plans temporal sequence in spoken recounts, eg ‘first’, ‘next’, ‘finally’, ‘then’. Expression • plans delivery of presentations and role-plays. ESL Scales Levels 4/5 Oral Interaction
  21. 21. Forms of Assessments Assessment Formative assessment Formative assessment is the practice of building a cumulative profile of student achievement. This usually takes place during day-to- day classroom activities and involves informal interaction and systematic observation of the student. The indicators may be used to guide teacher observations. While it may also include more formal assessment procedures, formative assessment provides a broader profile of the student than formal testing may provide. It is a valid and valuable part of overall assessment. Summative assessment Summative assessment is the practice of making judgements about student achievement at certain relevant points in the learning program, such as at the end of units of work, or the end of a term or year of schooling. Formal assessment activities such as tests,projects and assignments are generally used to make summative judgements. Such assessment tools may focus on a single outcome or on a number of outcomes. Formative and summative assessment complement each other, and both should be used to form a comprehensive profile of student achievement. Diagnostic assessment Information gained from assessment will be used in conjunction with other information to diagnose areas of need for individuals or groups of students and to determine students’ future goals. This information informs planning and programming. Values and Attitudes Outcomes V1 enjoys creating a range of spoken and written texts; V5 shows independence in using and learning language;
  22. 22. Talking & Listening Term 1
  23. 23. Content ESL Scales Teaching and Learning Activities Modifications Resources Additional Support ExtensionT&L: TS1.1 Oral Interaction What makes a good speaker? Chart paper levels 3/4 Students discuss and then the teacher records ideas on what they think makes a good speaker. This chart will need to be displayed in the class and referred to on a regular basis. Attentive audience. Oral InteractionT&L: TS1.1 Students brainstorm and list questions they can ask List of levels 3/4/5 each other about their daily news presentation. appropriateT&L: TS1.2 Discuss appropriate questioning techniques and use questionsT&L: TS1.3 of language, and role-play being an attentive displayed audience. * Students can participate in Daily News items based on local/national news they may hear or read about.
  24. 24. T&L: TS1.1 Oral Interaction Topic Talk levels 3/4/5T&L: TS1.2 Each student writes down a topic on a ¼ sheet of A4. A4 paper cut into * At the top of the page ¼T&L: TS1.3 Topics are put into a ‘Talking and Listening’ box. Students then select a topic sheet. Students have 10 minutes to write down as much as they can on the topic. Students present their ‘speeches’ to the class. Once all students have completed this task it can be repeated on a regular basis. (Note: Teacher can do a shared topic with class first and then demonstrate how to present it) What makes a good listener? Students have to show they are good listeners they must record two points made by each speaker in the A4 paper cut into above speeches. The teacher can then choose a ¼ Oral InteractionT&L: TS1.1 student to share their response. levels 3/4/5T&L: TS1.2
  25. 25. Content ESL Scales Teaching and Learning Activities Modifications Resources Additional Support Extension Picture & Text Drawing paperT&L: TS1.1 Oral Interaction Students are to read a familiar text to a friend. levels 3/4/5T&L: TS1.2 Students then choose their favourite part of the story and illustrate it, before presenting it to the class. The class looks at the written text and discusses whether it is supported by the illustrations. Story Sequence Oral Interaction The class has been listening to a variety of literaryT&L: TS1.1 texts and is to recall events in the text and to make levels 3/4/5T&L: TS1.2 predictions based on previous reading.T&L: TS1.3 Speech topics Palm cards
  26. 26. T&L: TS1.1 Oral Interaction Oral Presentation levels 3/4/5T&L: TS1.2 The students are given a variety of topics to research and must prepare notes for a one minuteT&L: TS1.3 oral presentation. They can use palm cards or memorise the speech for their presentation.
  27. 27. SpellingTerm 1
  28. 28. Content Teaching and learning activities Additional Resourc EvaluationWeeks 1-10 support es Extension GAMES Air Spelling 1. Choose a spelling word. With their index finder, students spell the word in the air and say the letters aloud. Tell students they must be able toWS1.11 "see" the letters as they are written in the air.Usesknowledge of 2. When the students get to the last letter, they underline the wholesight words word as they say the word aloud. Ask them if they can "see" the word inand letter the air.sound 3. After their response, ask these type of questions:correspondences and a --What is the third letter?variety of --What is the last letter?strategies to --What is the second letter?spell familiarwords 4. Then, have the students spell the word backwards orally (and with their index finger if they need to). Remind students that the word should be floating in the air in front of them and that they must continue to look at it throughout the activity. 5. When you are done with the word, continue on to the other spelling words. Do this activity daily and have the students practice it at home.
  29. 29. Spelling Race 1. Divide the class into two teams. 2. On the board, write Team 1 and Team 2 (or the names of the teams). 3. One person from each team goes to the board with chalk in hand.4. The teacher reads a spelling word. The two students must write that word on the board.5. The first person to finish spelling the word first gets a point for their team. 6. The team with the most points wins. Scrambled Spelling As part of their daily assignment, students are given a number of words that are scrambled. Without looking at their spelling list, the students are asked to unscramble the words within a time-limit and hand it into abasket. Those that correctly unscramble all the words receive stickers in their spelling booklets.
  30. 30. Word Searches or Crossword Puzzles Using a software or Puzzlemaker from Discovery.com, create wordsearches and puzzles from the weekly spelling list. This is a fun way for your students to practice their spelling. Spelling PoemsMost spelling words are taught through a common sound, such as short a,long e, etc. Since these words already rhyme, it is easy to create poems using their weekly spelling words.1. Have students read through the list and ask them what is the sound(s) that is repeated throughout.2. Have students brainstorm more words that rhyme with the sound being taught.3. Create a poem using the spelling words and the list of words from the brainstorm. 4. Illustrate the poem and publish it.
  31. 31. **** The poems are created together as a class for the first few months. Afterwards, if the students are ready, they can then create their own poems. Further Activities: Students keep their poems to create poetry books. Or, create a class poetry book in which the students can copy their favourite poems onto larger sheets of paper. Weekly Spelling Story Every Friday, the class creates a weekly spelling story with an illustration. This can be done as a class, in groups, with a partner, or individually. Stories are posted on a bulletin board.In the beginning of the year, the teacher should create the stories, with the help of the students, in order to model paragraph formation, story writing, punctuation, etc. Spelling Learning Centre 1. Put letters in a basket or bag. 2. One student reads a spelling word. 3. The second student uses the letters to spell the word.
  32. 32. 4. After the students finish the list, they switch roles and the first student does the spelling while the second does the reading. Spelling Puzzles 1. Write each spelling word on index cards.2. Cut the cards so that the letters are separated. 3. Place the pieces into an envelope (one envelope per word).4. Pass out the envelopes to the students. When you say go, students take out the pieces and put the letters together to create a spelling word. 5. When the teacher yells stop, the students put their hands at their sides. Teacher checks the cards to see if the word is spelled correctly. 6. Students then put all the pieces back into the envelope and pass it to another student. Newspaper Spelling 1. Give each student, pairs, or groups, a page from the newspaper. 2. Their job is to look for spelling words in the articles and circle them with marker or crayon. 3. Students make a list of the words they found.
  33. 33. Spelling TrainRead a spelling word aloud and have the students write it down. Using thelast letter in that word, students must write another word beginning with that last letter. They continue the train using the last letter of the word. You can put a certain limit on how many words they can create. Example: cat tan nap
  34. 34. Spelling Words Term 1Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5Shell Drab Grab Stable WrapSmell Draft Grace Stove WrathSpell Drag Grass Stack WreckSwell Dragon Grade Stage WreckageYell Drain Grain Stain WristFarewell Drama Gram Stair WriteDwell Drank Grammar Stale WrittenJell Drastic Grand Stamp WrongSell Draw Grant Star WrinkleBell Drip Greed Start WreathWeek 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10Fill Skate Sank Blue Spelling test of a selectionKill Sky Tank Cute of words leant throughoutShrill Shop Thank Flute the term.Chill Shark Fall LoveBill Honk Call MoveSill Plonk Mall ShoveSink Shut Make CluePink Flat Take ShoeLink Fly Lake Shakeshrink flew Bake Take
  35. 35. Text Type Term 1Response Week 1 - 5
  36. 36. Content ESL Scales Teaching and Learning Activities Modifications Resources Additional Support ExtensionReading: RS1.5 Week 1 Premier’s Reading Challenge list and Activity 1: books After students have listened to stories (taken from Premier’s Reading Challenge list) have them : Retell events in their own words. Role play the events. Display paperT&L: TS1.1 Activity 2:Responds tostories read aloud. Have students compile a list of different ways to make positive and negative statements about a story heard. Record these to display in the classroom as a resource for students, eg I enjoyed … I found this book interesting because … I found it boring when … I think it could have been better or more enjoyable if… This book isn’t interesting unless …
  37. 37. Week 2T&L: TS1.1 Activity 3: Paper for drawingExpresses a Students choose their own favourite part of a storypersonal point of and illustrate it. The class will look at the writtenview. text and discuss whether the illustrations support the text. Activity 4: Display paper Oral Interaction Students summarise read books. Teacher 3,4,5 introduces summarising skills in the simplest forms. List the characters eg. The book Little Read Riding Hood is about a girl, a wolf and a grandma. Display paperWriting: WS1.9 Oral Interaction 3,4,5
  38. 38. Reading: RS1.5 Week 3 Premier’s Reading Challenge books Activity 5: Complete a matrix on characters in a book, using adjectives to describe appearance, actions, habits and feelings. Then plot ‘feeling’ words on a horizontal line. Draw pictures that match the words and place under the words. Student A reads a familiar text to a friend. The friend then retells the story to the class.Writing: WS1.9 Week 4 Activity 6: As a class, students discuss a book read and jointly Display paper plan a response using the review structure Context-gives the background information Text description-describes main characters and the theme. Judgement-opinion expressing personal feelings.
  39. 39. T&L: TS1.1 Activity 7: In small groups, students discuss a book read and plan an oral review to present to class in which each Premier’s Reading group member makes a comment relative to the Challenge books group’s book.T&L: TS1.1 Reading and Have students place books in order of preference Responding 2,3 and select cards saying best, second best, third best Cards with best,Writing: WS1.10 etc. Encourage students to give reasons for their 2nd best, 3rd best choice. Teacher scribes a sentence using the etc. correct language and grammar. Eg. Student says ‘funny grandma’ Display paper Teacher writes ‘I like this book best because of the funny grandma.’ Activity 8: Have students build up their understanding of characters by; *Writing what characters have Writing books said in speech balloons or;Writing: WS1.10 *By drawing and labelling characters with their attributes.
  40. 40. Writing: WS1.10 Week 5 Writing books Activity 9:Have students write a response to books read by allowing students to choose a question that encourages this. Who was your favourite character and why? Draw ‘photos’ of two important events in the story and write a label for each.Writing: WS1.10 Encourage students to write a personal response to Display chart literature in their journals. Provide scaffolding for from previous review texts. lessons Start with title and author Journals Give brief summary of story Identify characters Make judgements that are personal opinions. Activity 10:Independently students plan and write a response using the review structure Context-gives the background information Text description-describes main charactersWriting: WS1.10 and the theme. Writing books Judgement-opinion expressing personal feelings.
  41. 41. Handwriting Term 1Week 1 - 5
  42. 42. Content ESL Scales Teaching and Learning Activities Additional Resources Support ExtensionHandwriting Week 1 Handwriting bookWS1.12 Date lead pencilProduces texts colour pencil No lessonusing letters of (each week)consistent sizeand week 2slope in NSW DateFoundation Style. o O o O o Oo, a, d, g, q, e, c, i, Olly the octopus wentj, l, t, f, h, m, n, k,r, b, p, u, y, x, z, s, out.v, w;
  43. 43. Week 3 Date a A a A a A Alice ate all the apples.Handwriting Week 4 Handwriting bookWS1.12 Date lead pencilProduces texts d D d D d D colour pencilusing letters of (each week) Dora didn’t dig up theconsistent sizeand dirt. Week 5slope in NSWFoundation Style. Dateo, a, d, g, q, e, c, i, g G g G g Gj, l, t, f, h, m, n, k,r, b, p, u, y, x, z, s, Golly gee went thev, w; girl.
  44. 44. Text Type Term 1Exposition Week 6 - 10
  45. 45. Content ESL Scales Teaching and Learning Activities Modifications Resources Additional Support Extension Oral Interaction Week 6 Activities; 1/2 • Ask questions that have a yes/no answer as a starting point, eg Should children wear hats? Oral Interaction • Introduce and model the sentence structure ‘I like’ 1/2 and ‘I don’t like’ in response to ‘Do you like …?’ Oral Interaction • Build on oral discussion of ‘I like …’ and ‘I don’t like 1/2/3 …’. Students construct a chart and use it as a basis for an oral presentation of their likes and dislikes. NOTE: Modality can be challenging for ESL learners, eg the canteen should sell fruit. • Ask students to stand on either side of the room in response to questions where they are required to express an opinion.
  46. 46. Oral Interaction • Model sentences that use causal connectives, eg I like dogs because … Break the sentences into 3/4/5 separate messages and make links between messages.T&L: TS1.1 Oral Interaction • Ask students, in pairs, to exchange opinions, eg What makes a good children’s television show?T&L: TS1.2 3/4/5 Students then present their partner’s point of view to the class, eg ‘John thinks … because …’. • Build up a list of issues with the class about familiar topics. Display them in the classroom.T&L: TS1.1 Display chart • Ask the class whether they agree/disagree with above topics.T&L: TS1.1
  47. 47. Content ESL Scales Teaching and Learning Activities Modifications Resources Additional Support ExtensionT&L: TS1.1 Week 7 Activities; Display chart • Encourage students to provide arguments for a particular position about a familiar school or community issue by answering teacher-posed questions such as Why do you think that? When would that be the case? Can you think of an example? How could you convince other people that it is right?. Build up responses on a board or on a wall chart.T&L: TS1.1 Display chart • Develop and display a list of conjunctions, eg because, so, then, and connectives, eg firstly, secondly, to assist students to form and order ideas in their spoken expositions. • Encourage students to use the structure of a simple oral exposition to frame a suggestion, eg ‘I think we should be allowed to … because/so that …’ in order to persuade others.
  48. 48. T&L: TS1.1 Week 8 Activities • Read the position statement of an exposition that deals with familiar subject matter without showing the arguments used by the author. Encourage students to predict and list possible arguments that Display paper could be included to justify this point. Read the textWriting: WS1.9 and compare their predictions with arguments foundWriting: WS1.10 in the text. Discuss which arguments are more persuasive (ie those used by the author or anyReading: RS1.5 student’s predictions not found in the text). Note: Teachers may need to write model expositions.
  49. 49. Content ESL Scales Teaching and Learning Activities Modifications Resources Additional Support ExtensionWriting: WS1.9 Week 9 Activities Display chartWriting: WS1.10 • Highlight the structure of an exposition by asking questions,Reading: RS1.5 What does the writer believe? Why do you think that? Why might the writer believe that? What does the writer want readers to believe?Writing: WS1.9 Eg. of Exposition Display these questions on a wall chart with theWriting: WS1.10 Display paper heading ‘Exposition’.Reading: RS1.5 • Read an exposition and locate the thinking verbs that indicate the author’s point of view, eg think, believe, feel. Jointly construct a poster of thinking verbs to use as a writing resource.Reading: RS1.5 • Individually, or in small groups, students connect Exposition jigsaw and sequence arguments from an exposition using a jigsaw activity.
  50. 50. Week 10 ActivitiesReading: RS1.5 • Focus on the social purpose of expositions by Display paper jointly constructing texts on relevant issues, eg letters to school magazine to have a rule changed in playground, arguments to encourage students to wear sun hats, speeches to convince classmates to vote for them as a monitor for a classroom job they like doing. • Annotate large display-size copies of sample expositions with names for each stage and aWriting: WS1.9 description of purpose. Refer to these samples when Samples of jointly constructing an exposition. Expositions
  51. 51. Content ESL Scales Teaching and Learning Activities Modifications Resources Additional Support ExtensionWriting: WS1.9 • Jointly construct a point of view held by most of Chart paper the students in the class, eg Most of the students inWriting: WS1.10 2 Red think that there should be more trees in the playground. Students work in small groups to think of an argument to support this point of view and then draft this argument into writing. The argument from each small group can then be used in a joint construction of an exposition on the given topic. • Provide students with a pro forma to use to write independently a simple exposition. Use sentence starters to give support, eg Firstly, trees should be planted so …Writing: WS1.9 Exposition ProformaWriting: WS1.10
  52. 52. Handwriting Term 1Week 6 - 10
  53. 53. Content ESL Scales Teaching and Learning Activities Modifications Resources Additional Support ExtensionHandwriting Handwriting bookWS1.12 Date Week 6 lead pencilProduces texts colour pencil q Q q Q q Qusing letters of (each week)consistent size Quickly please and beand quiet.slope in NSW Date Week 7Foundation Style. e E e E e E “Eek,” squeaked the mouse.
  54. 54. Week 8Date c C c C c C Could you please call the children?Handwriting Week 9Date Handwriting bookWS1.12 lead pencil i I i I i IProduces texts colour pencilusing letters of I liked the icy igloo. (each week)consistent size Week 10and Dateslope in NSWFoundation Style. j J j J j J Jumping jacks are the best.
  55. 55. Term 1 Weekly Overview Learning Experience
  56. 56. English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 2 Talking & Listening Spelling & Grammar Air Spelling 1. Choose a spelling word. With their index finder, students spell the word in the air and say the letters aloud.What makes a good speaker? Tell students they must be able to "see" the letters as they are written in the air. 2. When the students get to the last letter, they underline the whole word as they say the word aloud. Ask themStudents discuss and then the teacher if they can "see" the word in the air.records ideas on what they think makes a good 3. After their response, ask these type of questions:speaker. This chart will need to be displayedin the class and referred to on a regular basis. --What is the third letter? --What is the last letter? --What is the second letter? 4. Then, have the students spell the word backwards orally (and with their index finger if they need to). Remind students that the word should be floating in the air in front of them and that they must continue to look at it throughout the activity. 5. When you are done with the word, continue on to the other spelling words. Do this activity daily and have the students practice it at home. Handwriting Guided Reading Groupsweek 2 1._____________________________________Date 2._____________________________________o O o O o O 3.______________________________________Olly the octopus went out 4.______________________________________ 5.______________________________________
  57. 57. English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 3 Talking & Listening Spelling & Grammar Attentive audience. Spelling RaceStudents brainstorm and list questions they 1. Divide the class into two teams. 2. On the board, write Team 1 andcan ask each other about their daily news Team 2 (or the names of the teams). 3. One person from each team goespresentation. Discuss appropriate questioning to the board with chalk in hand. 4. The teacher reads a spellingtechniques and use of language, and role-play word. The two students must write that word on the boardbeing an attentive audience. 5. The first person to finish spelling the word first gets a point for their team. 6. The team with the most prints* Students can participate in Daily News items wins.based on local/national news they may hear orread about. Handwriting Guided Reading Groups 1._____________________________________Week 3 Date 2._____________________________________a A a A a A 3.______________________________________Alice ate all the 4.______________________________________apples. 5.______________________________________
  58. 58. English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 4 Talking & Listening Spelling & GrammarTopic TalkEach student writes down a topic on a ¼ sheet Scrambled Spellingof A4.* At the top of the page As part of their daily assignment, students are given a number of wordsTopics are put into a ‘Talking and Listening’ that are scrambled. Without looking at their spelling list, the students arebox. asked to unscramble the words within a time-limit and hand it into a basket. Those that correctly unscramble all the words receive stickers inStudents then select a topic sheet. their spelling booklets.Students have 10 minutes to write down asmuch as they can on the topic.Students present their ‘speeches’ to the class.Once all students have completed this task itcan be repeated on a regular basis.(Note: Teacher can do a shared topic withclass first and then demonstrate how topresent it) Handwriting Guided Reading Groups 1._____________________________________Week 4 2._____________________________________Date 3.______________________________________d D d D d DDora didn’t dig up the dirt. 4.______________________________________
  59. 59. English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 5 Talking & Listening Spelling & GrammarTopic TalkEach student writes down a topic on a ¼ sheet Word Searches or Crossword Puzzlesof A4.* At the top of the page Using a software or Puzzlemaker from Discovery.com, create wordTopics are put into a ‘Talking and Listening’ searches and puzzles from the weekly spelling list. This is a fun way forbox. your students to practice their spelling.Students then select a topic sheet.Students have 10 minutes to write down asmuch as they can on the topic.Students present their ‘speeches’ to the class.Once all students have completed this task itcan be repeated on a regular basis.(Note: Teacher can do a shared topic with class first andthen demonstrate how to present it) Handwriting Guided Reading GroupsWeek 5 1._____________________________________ 2._____________________________________Date 3.______________________________________g G g G g G 4.______________________________________Golly gee went the girl. 5.______________________________________
  60. 60. English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 6 Talking & Listening Spelling & Grammar Spelling Poems What makes a good listener? Most spelling words are taught through a common sound, such as short a, long e, etc. Since these words already rhyme, it is easy to create poems using their weekly spelling words.Students have to show they are good listeners 1. Have students read through the list and ask them what is the sound(s) that is repeated they must record two points made by each throughout. speaker in the above speeches. The teacher can then choose a student to share their 2. Have students brainstorm more words that rhyme with the sound being taught. response. 3. Create a poem using the spelling words and the list of words from the brainstorm. 4. Illustrate the poem and publish it. **** The poems are created together as a class for the first few months. Afterwards, if the students are ready, they can then create their own poems. Further Activities: Students keep their poems to create poetry books. Or, create a class poetry book in which the students can copy their favourite poems onto larger sheets of paper. Handwriting Guided Reading GroupsWeek 6 1._____________________________________Date 2._____________________________________q Q q Q q Q 3.______________________________________Quickly please and be quiet. 4.______________________________________ 5.______________________________________
  61. 61. English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 7 Talking & Listening Spelling & Grammar Weekly Spelling Story What makes a good listener? Every Friday, the class creates a weekly spelling story with an illustration. Students have to show they are good This can be done as a class, in groups, with a partner, or individually. Stories listeners they must record two points are posted on a bulletin board. made by each speaker in the abovespeeches. The teacher can then choose a In the beginning of the year, the teacher should create the stories, with the student to share their response. help of the students, in order to model paragraph formation, story writing, punctuation, etc. Handwriting Guided Reading GroupsWeek 7 1._____________________________________Date 2._____________________________________e E e E e E 3.______________________________________“Eek,” squeaked 4.______________________________________the mouse. 5.______________________________________
  62. 62. English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 8 Talking & Listening Spelling & Grammar Spelling Puzzles Picture & Text 1. Write each spelling word on index cards.Students are to read a familiar text to a 2. Cut the cards so that the letters are separated. 3. Place the pieces into an envelope (onefriend. envelope per word).Students then choose their favourite part 4. Pass out the envelopes to the students. When you say go, students take out the pieces andof the story and illustrate it, before put the letters together to create a spelling word.presenting it to the class. The class looks 5. When the teacher yells stop, the students put their hands at their sides. Teacher checksat the written text and discusses whether the cards to see if the word is spelled correctly.it is supported by the illustrations. 6. Students then put all the pieces back into the envelope and pass it to another student. Handwriting Guided Reading GroupsWeek 8 1._____________________________________Date 2._____________________________________c C c C c C 3.______________________________________Could you please call the children? 4.______________________________________
  63. 63. English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 9 Talking & Listening Spelling & Grammar ActivitiesStory Sequence Newspaper SpellingThe class has been listening to a variety of 1. Give each student, pairs, or groups, a page from the newspaper.literary texts and is to recall events in thetext and to make predictions based on 2. Their job is to look for spelling words in the articles and circle them withprevious reading. marker or crayon. 3. Students make a list of the words they found. Handwriting Guided Reading GroupsWeek 9 1._____________________________________Date 2._____________________________________i I i I i I 3.______________________________________I liked the icyigloo. 4.______________________________________ 5.______________________________________
  64. 64. English Teaching & Learning Experience Week 10 Talking & Listening Spelling & Grammar Spelling TrainOral Presentation Read a spelling word aloud and have the students write it down. Using the last letter in that word, students must write another word beginning with that lastThe students are given a variety of topics letter. They continue the train using the last letter of the word. You can putto research and must prepare notes for a a certain limit on how many words they can create.one minute oral presentation. They can Example:use palm cards or memorise the speech catfor their presentation. tan nap Handwriting Guided Reading GroupsWeek 10 1._____________________________________Datej J j J j J 2._____________________________________Jumping jacks are 3.______________________________________the best. 4.______________________________________ 5.______________________________________
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