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Arp Report Erika Rimes 2007
 

Arp Report Erika Rimes 2007

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Action Research Project

Action Research Project

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    Arp Report Erika Rimes 2007 Arp Report Erika Rimes 2007 Document Transcript

    • Erika Rimes Master of Teaching – Primary Education 2007 Action Research Project: How can I effectively develop students’ visual literacy skills in stage 3?Erika Rimes 306 205 904 1University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • ContentsA) Context of research pp 3B) Research issue and rationale pp 4C) Methodology pp 6D) Data collected & Analysis of data pp 11E) Critical Reflection pp 27F) Implications pp 28G) Bibliography pp 29Erika Rimes 306 205 904 2University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • Does image matter? : An exploration into the teaching and student learning of visual literacy in stage 3A) Contextual statementThe school, where I conducted my research, has priorities to cater for the needs ofindividual children in a caring environment. There are two OC classes, and three Supportclasses including a special Language class, as well as English as a second languageprograms and class. The student’s at the school are 67% from a non-English speakingbackground. Many countries represented include countries in Asia, the Middle East,Europe and the Pacific Islands.The class I taught and conducted my Action Research Project was on an OC classconsisting of 30 year 5 students – 15 boys and 15 girls. I was involved in team teachingas there were three teachers teaching the year 5/6 OC class. I taught by myself as wellas team teaching when I was not conducting my own lessons. The students were from arange of backgrounds including Chinese, Indonesian, European, and Indian. All thestudents were of a high academic level.Erika Rimes 306 205 904 3University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • B) Research issue and rationaleResearch issue: How can I effectively develop students’ visual literacy skills in stage 3?The purpose of my Action Research Project is to develop students’ visual literacy skillsand to better understand my own pedagogical practices through my own teachings ofvisual literacy and understand visual literacy as a dynamic teaching and learning domain.Visual literacy is vital in today’s world with an abundance of multimodal texts, whichinclude understanding of visual literacy and using the proper meta-language in responseto and making meaning from visual texts is vitally important for any students growing upin a multi-modal society.In today’s world it is important for students to take active roles in making meaning fromvisual texts, as not only is the world full of books use images to communicate meaning.In education it is more than ever important to be able to not only understand multi-modal text (video, TV, Internet, Radio, Newspaper, Advertisements) but to alsointerpret and teach all kinds of text. For example, The NSW Board of Studies considers‘viewing’ as a part of literacy development describes visual literacy as a learningoutcome, defined as ‘observing and comprehending a visual text such as a diagram,illustration or photograph’ (NSW Curriculum, English Syllabus K-6 Modules, 1998 p.100).Therefore teaching concepts from visual literacy and giving students the meta-languageto respond to visual images can help students to understand the visual cues of anillustrator or artist to convey meaning.Erika Rimes 306 205 904 4University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • Visual literacy is vital in today’s world as “it is a part of the wider aspect of how wecommunicate in our culture” (Callow p.g. 3). We are continually being bombarded withmultimodal texts, which involve a wide range of “visual, electronic and digital images”(Walsh, 2006, p.24;) and our process of learning is not only through reading but throughcontext and learning “about language, both implicitly through experience, and explicitlyby having the structures and grammar of various texts explained to us” (Callow p.g. 3).For students to better understand visual texts I aim to draw from a variety of context,known and unknown, in a variety of media, to further enhance student’s understandingsto decode and construct visual images. Visualising and conceptualising through visualtexts/images adds to the language learning process through predicting, constructing,discussing and understanding context and text of an “imagine as the words of a text willnever be able to “tell” everything” (Walsh, 2006, p. 30).Furthermore as an educator I find “it is timely to consider that the daily worlds thatour students move through are increasingly being filled with visual images.” (Connelly,p.g. 16, 2006). Visual Images is a way of representing visual cultures and therefore“pivotal to how they (students) are being represented.” (Connelly, 2006, p.g. 25).Erika Rimes 306 205 904 5University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • C) Methodology & Teaching Strategy Methodology: Collecting dataObservations • Class discussion with students • Group discussion among students • One-on-one discussions with studentsWork samples • Written responses from students (Responding to text) • Visual Arts task (Producing text)Reflections and discussions • Mentor teacher before and after lessons about the lessons • My own reflections on my teaching practice Teaching Strategy Teaching approach in visual literacy will encompass common teaching practices as well as incorporating prior knowledge of visual literacy and a further development of my own knowledge in combination with teaching students the strategies employed by illustrators in a variety of mediums. 1. Teaching and Learning Experience 2. Outcomes & Indicators 3. Assessment Erika Rimes 306 205 904 6 University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • 1. Teaching and learning experienceMy Action Research Project focused primarily on the following points; • developing students’ understanding of the meaning-making strategies illustrators and artists use; • assessing and evaluating how effective my teachings of visual literacy are in the classroom environmentVisual literacy is an aspect of literacy that has slowly been increasing in the importancein today’s world, and the importance for developing “meaning-making tools” is ever morerelevant now than ever. As “the now overwhelming evidence of the importance of visualcommunication and the now problematic absence of the means for talking and thinkingabout what is actually communicated by images and by visual design” (Kress & VanLeuween, 2001 p.15)Applying teaching strategies to develop students’ visual literacy skills involves anunderstanding of how we learn to read images and what do we use to read images“bringing together our own knowledge, cultural perspective, prior knowledge andexplicitly taught skills” (Unsworth, 2001, p.g. 19). Students will inherently bring togetherdifferent viewpoints when first interpreting and understanding visual images. Thereforeapproaching my teaching, using specific, relevent images, will help focus the meaning-making process and the meaning-making tools illustrators and artists use to conveymeaning or to tell a story in a political, historical, mathematical or social context.Erika Rimes 306 205 904 7University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • My strategies involved in teaching and developing visual literacy skills within stage 3 in a classroom environment will utilise the following concepts prior to and during; Focused teaching approaches in visual literacy Key concepts used as a basis for my implementation of visual literacyIdentifying and classifying visual images Visual image-making process RepresentationThis is a major part of the meaning-making process “When visual texts are produced, images and words infrom the viewer’s perspective as well as the artist or combination are used to represent ideas to makeillustrator’s purpose and aim in creating a visual image. meanings and to represent versions of the world.”Therefore I will be aware when choosing images, that (Simpson, 2004, p. 19 )“visual texts construct worlds, cultures and identities inpowerful and often overtly ideological ways via semiotic Discoursesgrammars and cultural tools,” (Connelly, 2006, p22 ). “Inside visual texts discourses are detected….Ways of thinking and acting that individuals and groups can identify with…discourses shape attitudes, beliefs andResponding to and producing visual images values through the use of language influencing how individuals understand and act in the world.”Responding to visual images will include such practices as (Connelly, 2006, p. 28)talking and listening to one another, actively describingelements of visual image and actively creating or re- Intertexualitycreating their own visual images, “learners write or To read intertexuality inside visual texts means toencode visuals as a tool for communication” and look to elements in a text that infer similarities,therefore “Students develop their visual abilities connections, references, and relationships to otherthrough use.” (Connelly, 2006, p. 25). texts. Intertexuality is strongly relied on prior knowledge e.g. Shrek (Connelly, 2006, p.30) These three tools can be present in any one given text Erika Rimes 306 205 904 8 University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • Furthermore my teaching approach will include the following elements; Focus of teaching and learning experience Development of students understanding of meaning- (NSW Board of Studies, Classroom Assessment making tools using ‘Summary of Visual Codes’ Resource Stage 3 ‘Seeing Meaning’) (Callow 199 and Kress & Van Leuween 1996) Modelled reading response to visual images 1. What’s happening?Displaying and reading a range of visual images tostudents Discussion and analysis of a visual images; What is the action?Always modelling the meta-language (the language to What is the message?talk about language) 2. How is the relationship developed between the Guided writing response of visual images viewer, the image and the image maker?Give students guidance in understanding the variety ofways illustrators and artists use different strategies Jointly construct ideas in response to a visual imagefor different purposes. Using language such as camera angles, colour, offer and demands Independent response to visual imagesEncourage students to draw on both images and the 3. How is the image composed?print when constructing meaning and to talk about thisto the readers. Reading paths – lines and vectorsHave them compare the text in terms of their purposeand intended audience. Layout -How do we read the image? Top/bottom orHave them decide which text is the most eye-catching Left/rightand talk about why. Erika Rimes 306 205 904 9 University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • 2. Outcomes & Indicators Throughout my Action Research Project I referred specifically to the syllabus including English and Visual Arts. This helped structure what I want to teach, how I will teach and what I want the students to achieve; English Outcomes Creative Arts outcomes NSW Curriculum, English Syllabus K-6 Modules, 1998 p.100 NSW Curriculum, Creative Arts Syllabus K-6 Modules, 1998, p. 30RS3.5 Reading and viewing textsReads independently an extensive range of texts with increasing content demandsand responds to themes and issues VAS3.1 Investigates subject matter in an attempt to*Understands a more complex expository text represent likeliness of things in the world*Interprets a factual text *Explores historical events as subject matter for a movie*Reads a text demanding a degree of technicality and abstraction posterRS3.6 Skills and strategies VAS3.2 Makes artworks for different audiences,Uses a comprehensive range of skills and strategies appropriate to the type of text assembling materials in a variety of waysbeing read *Considers the specific requirements of an artwork*uses, adjusts and combines higher order skills in decoding texts and accessing visual (poster) to clearly convey message to an audience*Information e.g. scanning for information, examining pictures and text, reviewing partsof the text VAS3.3 Acknowledges that audiences respond inRS3.7 Context and text different ways to artworks and that there are differentUnderstands that texts are constructed by people and identifies ways in which opinions about the values of artworkstexts differ according to their purpose, audience and subject matter *Understands that artworks can be made for different*explains techniques used by the writer and illustrator to represent a point of view and reasons.position the reader *Recognises that an audience may have different views*identifies how camera angle, viewer position, colour, size and shading in a visual text about the meaning of an artworkconstruct meaning*justifies opinions about the motives and feelings of characters in literary texts 3. Assessments My assessment strategies in understanding students visual literacy skills has been drawn from ‘Classroom assessment resource for stage 3’ – ‘Module 3 Reading: Seeing the meaning’ by Board of Studies 1998. This approach has helped focus my own understanding of how to teaching visual and written texts and to assess students’ understandings of the meaning making strategies illustrators and writers use in various mediums. Assessment focus throughout the cycles: Reading about, responding to, and producing images Students; (Board of Studies, Classroom Assessment Resource Stage 3 1998) • use higher-order skills to access vital information from visual images and supporting text • identify how elements of a visual text construct meaning • identify how authors target audience in constructing visual texts • incorporate and use elements of visual literacy to produce a visual image with a purpose Erika Rimes 306 205 904 10 University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • D) Data collected/ Analysis of data Cycle 1: 8th August – 22nd August 2007 Cycle 1 Aims: • Students capability when identifying and interpreting images • Reflect on my own teachings of visual literacy • Assess students learning at the end of the cycle Reading images & understanding the meaning Observations: Introduction Through out my observations of lessons where I was introducing visual literacy skills I used specific examples, developed from my own findings as well as from Jon Callow (1999), where visual images use colour, angles and layout, lines and vectors to model & introduce the meta language. Students were able to respond, identify and classify visual images. However, I had to focus my questioning using the meta-language and give the students terms and definitions to use when introducing the meta-language about visual images. Sources: Google Images and Callow, ‘Image matters:Visual texts in the classroom’ (1999) Furthermore students were also able to discuss further as a class general ideas about the different images the students see (where, when, why,) Picture book / book Newspaper/magazine“To help understand the text” “Show the most important news first”“Show characters in the book” “Grabs your attention so you will buy it”“Images help say something that can’t be written” “Uses big pictures to make you read it” Advertisement Artwork“To persuade” “To express something they (artists) are interested in”“To sell something that is good” “To tell you something about a place or a place in time ““they (advertisers) say only good things about aproduct to sell it” Quotations taken from class discussions and student responses of the above images, September 2007 Erika Rimes 306 205 904 11 University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • Reading images & understanding the meaning Observations: Class Activity: Student’s own visual images to analyseThroughout further observations in cycle 1 I did a class activity where students broughtin their own visual images they either found or liked from home, books or internet. Thisactivity was focused as a pair task, getting the students involved in responding to avisual image verbally and in a written response. This task helped begin studentsunderstanding of the meta-language with a focus of ‘field, mode and tenor’The results from this class activity created a variety of responses from students notwriting in sentences to writing in detail about the chosen pictures. This gave greatinsight into some of the visual images students respond to which ranged from satiricalhumour, pictures advertising something to pictures from books as well as artworks.Erika Rimes 306 205 904 12University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • Assessment: ‘Outrageous Reactions’ NSW Board of Studies, Classroom Assessment Resource Stage 3: Module 3 ‘Seeing the meaning’ 1998 Discussion Framework • How do you think the photographer wants you to • What is happening in this respond to this picture? photograph? • Are you influenced in some way? • What message is being • Describe the ways the pictures communicated? support the written text placed • How has the message been in relation to the image? constructed? Think about: • Why do you think it has been -The Camera Angle done this way? -The use of colour • Describe the ways the picture -Objects in the picture, their size don’t support the written text. and position • What effect does this have on you the reader?NSW Board of Studies, Stage 3 Assessment: Module 3 ‘Seeing the meaning’ – ‘Outrageous Reactions’ 1998 What was evident? Students were able to; • Access meaning from the photograph and the text and refer to both in discussion • Use heading and photograph to access meanings • Read, review and discuss image with technical language • Justify if the visual image supports the writer’s view Erika Rimes 306 205 904 13 University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • Work samples – Assessment 1 Example: B - High Example: C - Sound Board of Studies, Classroom Assessment Resource Stage 3: Module 3 ‘Seeing the meaning’, ‘Outrageous Reactions’ 1998Erika Rimes 306 205 904 14University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • Example: D - Basic Board of Studies, Classroom Assessment Resource Stage 3: Module 3 ‘Seeing the meaning’, ‘Outrageous Reactions’ 1998 Cycle 1 Overview Board of Studies, NSW Curriculum, English Syllabus, K-6 Modules, 1998, p. 29, p.33,RS3.5 Reads independently an extensive range of texts with increasing contentdemands and responds to themes and issues*Understands a more complex expository text*Interprets a factual text*Reads a text demanding a degree of technicality and abstractionRS3.7 Understands that texts are constructed by people and identifies ways inwhich texts differ according to their purpose, audience and subject matter*explains techniques used by the writer and illustrator to represent a point of view andposition the reader*identifies how camera angle, viewer position, colour, size and shading in a visual textconstruct meaning*justifies opinions about the motives and feelings of characters in literary texts Assessment Activity: Outrageous Reactions’Erika Rimes 306 205 904 Assessment Module, August 2007 15University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • Cycle 1 Reflection Strengths Weaknesses Where to next?Good use of technology. Iwas able to incorporate theuse of the data projector Continue modelling thewhich helped in discussing There was a need to meta-languageand analysing visual images further develop myas a class modelling of the meta- language for analysing and Incorporate more focusedStudents were engaged in discussing visual images. lessons where students canthe activities and were able relate toto beginning their visualliteracy journey throughclassify and identify visual Further assessmentsimages Students were unable to clearly justify theirGreat use of resources interpretation of visual Develop more group tasksdeveloped from the Board images, needing moreof Studies (1998) and from modelling from the teachermy visual literacy researchMy questioning was goodand still developing,reflected through studentsresponses.Erika Rimes 306 205 904 16University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • Cycle 2: 27th August – 7th September 2007 Cycle 2 Aims:• Achieve specific outcomes and indicators from the Board of Studies, NSW Curriculum, English Syllabus, K-6 Modules• Implement focused activities from Marsden’s ‘The Rabbits’, 1998, Hachwtte Livre Australia Pty Ltd.• Observe students ability to apply knowledge from Cycle 1 Findings – Observations: Lessons and activities of students applying knowledge Activity: Responding to adsStudents were able to focus their meta-language about visual images applying knowledgeabout demands and offers, layout, colour saturation and reading paths on the followingpictures. Image Source: Sydney Morning Herald, Sunday Life Magazine, September 2007 Activity: ‘Teaching Values’ Pictures (PETA)These images further developed the student’s knowledge relating to the topics I wasteaching them in other subjects such as HSIE about reconciliation in Australia. Thefollowing pictures dealt with values such honesty and trustworthiness, freedom and careand compassion.Image source: Rowan, Gauld, Cole-Adams, Connolly, ‘Teaching Values’ 2007, Primary English Teaching Association p.84, p.92 and, p. 95Erika Rimes 306 205 904 17University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • What was evident? Students were able to; • apply meta-language to new images as well as reviewing well-known images (‘Outrageous reactions’) • understand and respect everyone’s different opinion and thoughts about values such as ‘freedom’ • discuss and justifying own views in a debate • debate about own ideas which was sparked by visual images • learn from visual images about different representation of values Assessment: “The Rabbits” by John Marsden, Illustrated by Shaun Tan Discussion Framework • When you first saw this picture book what of story did you think it was going to be? What made you think this? • Now that you have read it, is it what you predicted the story to be? Why, why not? • Is there anything you didn’t understand in this text? (Discuss further) • What is the picture book about? (Symbolic or literal) • Who do you think the picture book is written for? • What is the purpose of the picture book? • What caught your attention? Why? • Why would someone choose to read this picture book? What was evident?Image source: Marsden, ‘The Rabbits’ 2007 Students were able to: Image source: Marsden, ‘The Rabbits’ 2007 • Read and understand symbolic and literal meanings in a picture book • Access meaning from pictures and text and refer to in discussion (Use of colour, layout and composition, characterisation, how the viewer is meant to feel/see certain things) • Explain ways the illustrator and writer position the reader and represent a point of view Erika Rimes 306 205 904 18 University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • Class discussion with written response Image source: Marsden, ‘The Rabbits’ 2007 Image source: Marsden, ‘The Rabbits’ 2007 Summary of visual codes Used as a basis for discussion and worksheet for assessment1. What’s happening? Discussion and analysis of a visual images; What is the action? What is the message?2. How is the relationship developed between the Jointly construct ideas in response to a visual imageviewer, the image and the image maker? Using language such as camera angles, colour, offer and demands3. How is the image composed? Reading paths – lines and vectors Layout -How do we read the image? Top/bottom or Left/right Questions developed from Callow,‘Image matters,(1999) Erika Rimes 306 205 904 19 University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • Work samples – Assessment 2 Lesson Topic: “The Rabbits” by John Marsden and Illustrations by Shaun Tan, 1998Erika Rimes 306 205 904 20University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • Work samples – Assessment 2 continued… Cycle 2 Overview Assessment Outcomes and Indicators - English Syllabus Board of Studies, English K-6, NSW Board of Studies, p. 31, p.33, 1998RS3.6 Uses a comprehensive range of skills and strategies appropriate to the typeof text being read*uses, adjusts and combines higher order skills in decoding texts and accessingvisual*Information e.g. scanning for information, examining pictures and text, reviewingparts of the textRS3.7 Understand that texts are constructed by people and identifies ways inwhich texts differ according to their purpose, audience and subject matter*explains techniques used by the writer and illustrator to represent a point of view andposition the reader*identifies how camera angle, viewer position, colour, size and shading in a visual textconstruct meaning*justifies opinions about the motives and feelings of characters in literary textsErika Rimes 306 205 904 21University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • Assessment Activities: Responding to Visual Images from Rowan, Gauld, Connelly, and Cole-Adams, 2007 ‘Teaching Values’ & Marsden, ‘The Rabbits’ 1998 Cycle 2 Reflection Strengths Weaknesses Where to next?Students engaged incontent • Students to produce Need for more lessons to their own visual imagesStudents applied prior develop a widerknowledge in a range of interpretation and • Students reflect onsettings understanding of the “The their new skills in visual Rabbits” literacyGroup tasks • Continue with relevantValues pictures – cultural contentlearning activityErika Rimes 306 205 904 22University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • Cycle 3: 10th September – 14th September 2007 Cycle 3 Aims:• Assess students’ ability in creating their own visual image• Discuss with students how they feel now about reading, discussing and understanding visual images• Reflect on activities of visual literacyAssessment task;Students has to create a movie poster Poster criteria:from finding, scanning, photocopying, • Title for the moviedrawing or downloading images related • Students name as the starto one of the following historical events; • A sentence/synopsis promoting the*Gold Rush *The Eureka Stockade or movie / informing about the movie*FederationWhat was evident?Students were able to demonstrate and show an understanding of;• layout - where text should be located on the poster?• size, font and colour- Can the audience easily read the text?• assessment task - Does the image clearly illustrate the historical event?• colour - What colours are most effective to capture someone’s attention?• Composition - How are the different parts of the poster are organised Work Samples – Assessment 3 Producing images – Movie Poster Identity of students has been protected Assessment task from Stage 3 COGS Unit – Traditions and Heritage Image Source: Gold Rush Movie Poster Activity, Year 5, September 2007Erika Rimes 306 205 904 23University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • Identity of students has been protected Assessment task from Stage 3 COGS Unit – Traditions and Heritage Image Source: Gold Rush Movie Poster Activity, Year 5, September 2007 Cycle 3 Assessment 3 Assessment Outcomes and Indicators – Visual Arts Board of Studies, Creative Arts K-6, NSW Board of Studies, p.45, 1998VAS3.1 Investigates subject matter in an attempt to represent likeliness of thingsin the world*Explores historical events as subject matter for a movie posterVAS3.2 Makes artworks for different audiences, assembling materials in a varietyof ways*Considers the specific requirements of an artwork (poster) to clearly convey messageto an audienceVAS3.3 Acknowledges that audiences respond in different ways to artworks andthat there are different opinions about the values of artworks*Understands that artworks can be made for different reasons.*Recognises that an audience may have different views about the meaning of an artworkErika Rimes 306 205 904 24University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • Assessment Activity: Gold Rush Movie Poster, September 2007Erika Rimes 306 205 904 25University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • E) Critical ReflectionsAs a reflective practitioner at the beginning of my teaching career my Action ResearchProject in visual literacy has taught me more about the importance of how students andteachers can learn as well as enjoy visual images. My Action Research Project hasdeveloped such a positive response from the students, which is evident in theirdiscussions and work samples. This has only enriched my teaching practice knowingsubject content and how to teach that content to their students ((NSW Institute ofTeaching , Professional Teaching Standards Document, Element 1, 2005) and furthermore develop and continue improving professional knowledge and practice ((NSWInstitute of Teaching , Professional Teaching Standards Document, Element 6, 2005)Overall this has given myself a reason to continue and incorporate visual literacy andgrammar into my everyday teachings.“Students need to be aware that there may be preferred or dominant interpretations ofan image, with which they might not always agree. It is vital, both for understanding our world and teaching students why image matters, that we are able to critique and question visual texts as well as enjoy and learn from them” (Callow, 1999, p.41)Student developed meaning making skills using technical language which wererepresented in the overall assessment outcomes achieved. Students developed the skillsof being able to talk about, respond to, write about and produce visual images wasdeveloped through a range of experiences of applying knowledge in different ways. Theresults of each assessment showed an increase of students visual literacy skills, showingan increase in High (17% > 48%) and outstanding (0% >14%) assessments results and agradual decrease in Sound (50% > 30%) and Basic (33% > 5%) results.The most important aspect of developing student’s visual literacy skills was throughconstructing well structured and designed tasks and assessments. This has helped myability to “plan, assess and report for effective learning” (NSW Institute of Teaching ,Professional Teaching Standards Document, Element 3, 2005) which students haveeffectively been engaged in and responded to, source of demonstrating an understandingof visual literacy. Overall students showed engagement and development depending onthe task set, which indicates how important it is to always give students a range ofexperiences when learning and developing new skills.Erika Rimes 306 205 904 26University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • F) ImplicationsIn my future teachings of visual literacy I would develop lessons to further developself-regulated and guided learning. Students in the Opportunity Class were challengedfrom the content I presented them from. This could be due to no recentlyimplementation of lessons which focus in visual literacy learning. This was an issuethroughout my action research project as I would further investigate to make surestudents can develop more independent learning from my modelling and guided teachingsin visual literacy.The extent to which the students were engaged was dependent on the subject contentand the task set. Students were consistent in their efforts and interests in discussionsand responses to the visual images however some students were inconsistent in beingengaged in the task at hand. I would further develop my tasks set, offering moreinteractive subject content such as looking at Drama and interactive mediums such aswebsites and TV advertisements.An important aspect of my Action Research Project was that I did teach in anOpportunity Class. This gave me the freedom to teach quite mature students, being ableto discuss in great detail visual images in one hour lessons. I realise that I would have tofurther develop implementation of visual literacy lessons in a main-stream class, as frommy previous experience a main-steam class would need more concise lessons. This wouldalso be dependent on which stage – considering if it was early stage 1, stage 1 or stage 2;which I would have to adapt my teachings to suit the age, stage and particular class.Overall I have felt visual literacy lessons should be incorporated into Key Learning Areasnot just as simply the focus of all lessons. I found throughout my Action ResearchProject I was able to give much focused visual literacy lessons which sometimesstudents responded to in a negative way. I would focus the meta-language of visualimages through out tasks and incorporate visual literacy based tasks throughout all theKey Learning Areas.Erika Rimes 306 205 904 27University of Sydney M/teach 2007
    • G) BibliographyBoard of Studies, Creative Arts K-6, NSW Board of Studies, 1998Board of Studies, English K-6, NSW Board of Studies, 1998Board of Studies, ‘Outrageous Reactions’, Classroom Assessment Resource Stage 3:Module 3 Seeing the meaning,Callow, Jon (ed.) ‘Image matters: Visual texts in the classroom’ (1999) PETA, SydneyConnelly, Jan, ‘Tools for analysing visual literacy in the middle years’, University of NewEngland, Literacy Learning: The Middle Years, Vol 14 No.3, 2006Kress & Van Leuween ‘Reading images, The Grammar of Visual Design’ RoutledgePublishing, 1996, New York, NYMarsden, John and Tan, Shaun, ‘The Rabbits’, 1998, Hachwtte Livre Australia Pty LtdProfessional Teaching Standards, NSW Institute of Teaching, DETRowan, L., Gauld, J., Cole-Adams, J., & Connolly, A., ‘Teaching Values’, Primary EnglishTeaching Association 2007, Sydney, AustraliaSimpson, Alyson, ‘Visual literacy: A coded language for viewing in the classroom. ‘(2004)PETA, Sydney.Sydney Morning Herald, Sunday Life Magazine, September 2007Unsworth, Len, ‘Teaching Multiliteracies across the curriculum’, Open University Press,McGraw-Hill Education, NY, 2001M, Walsh, ‘Reading visual and multimodal texts: how is ‘reading’ different? AustralianCatholic University, 2006Erika Rimes 306 205 904 28University of Sydney M/teach 2007