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Action Research Project Presentation

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  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Critical thinkers Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904
  • Erika Rimes Sydney University 306205904

Transcript

  • 1. Visual Literacy An exploration into the teaching and student learning of visual literacy in stage 3 Action Research Project Erika Rimes September 2007 Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 2. Context of Research
    • Features of the school
    • Located in Sydney’s west
    • K-6, co-educational public school
    • Students in the school - 67% are from a non-English speaking background. Many countries are represented here, including countries in Asia, the Middle East, Europe and the Pacific Islands.
    • Features of the class
    • OC Stage 3 class consisting of 30 year 5 students
    • 15 Boys and 15 girls
    • Cultural background of students in year 5 class ranged from Chinese, Indian and European
    Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 3. Rationale & Justification
    • Why visual literacy?
    • To develop students skills in becoming critical thinkers of their surroundings
    • To further my understandings of visual literacy and how to teach it
    • Visual literacy is an important of the KLAs
    • What is visual literacy?
    • Visual – refers to images we see
    • (pictures, drawings, photographs, ads, moving images (TV/movies), artworks etc…)
    • Literacy encompasses a wider scope than simply being able to read and write.
    • (Visual grammar – field, mode and tenor)
    Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 4. Research Question How can I effectively develop students visual literacy skills in stage 3 ? Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 5. Research Kress & Van Leuween ‘Reading images, The Grammar of Visual Design’ Routledge Publishing, 1996, New York, NY Unsworth, Len, ‘Teaching Multiliteracies across the curriculum’, Open University Press, McGraw-Hill Education, NY, 2001 Callow, Jon (ed.) ‘Image matters: Visual texts in the classroom’ (1999) PETA, Sydney Summary of visual codes Callow, Jon (ed.) ‘Image matters: Visual texts in the classroom’ (1999) PETA, Sydney Field Mode Tenor Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904 What’s happening? (Is it symbolic/abstract/action…?) *Action *Message How is the relationship developed between the viewer, the image and the image maker? *Angles – Shot distance (long, medium, close) *Shot distances *Colour *Offers or demands How is the image composed? *Reading paths – lines and vectors *Layout
  • 6. Research aims 1: Develop student’s visual literacy skills through a variety of experiences 2: Develop structured and useful visual literacy tasks and assessments 3: Develop and reflect on my own teachings of visual literacy to further improve on my teaching practice Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 7. Methodology Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904 Observations
    • Class discussion with students
    • Group discussion among students
    • One-on-one discussions with students
    Work samples
    • Written responses from students
    • Visual arts task
    Reflections and discussions
    • Mentor teacher before and after lessons about the lessons
    • My own reflections on my teaching practice
  • 8. Teaching Strategies overview Teaching and Learning Experience Outcomes and Indicators Assessment Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 9. Cycle One Students capability when identifying and interpreting images Reflect on my own teachings of visual literacy Assess students learning at the end of the cycle Aims Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 10. Findings – Reading images & understanding the meaning Observations: Introduction Introduction using specific examples where visual images use colour , angles and layout, lines and vectors to model & introduce the meta language Discussions as a class general ideas about the different images the students see (where, when, why,) Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904 Picture book / book “ To help understand the text” “ Show characters in the book” “ Images help say something that can’t be written” Newspaper/magazine “ Show the most important news first” “ Grabs your attention so you will buy it” “ Uses big pictures to make you read it” Advertisement “ To persuade” “ To sell something that is good” “ they (advertisers) say only good things about a product to sell it” Artwork “ To express something they (artists) are interested in” “ To tell you something about a place or a place in time “
  • 11. Findings – Reading images & understanding the meaning Observations: Introduction Class Activity: Student’s own visual images to analyse Not an assessment Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 12. Findings – Assessment
    • What was evident?
    • Students were able to;
    • Access meaning from the photograph and the text and refer to both in discussion
    • Use heading and photograph to access meanings
    • Read, review and discuss image with technical language
    • Justify if the visual image supports the writers view
    Assessment: ‘Outrageous Reactions’ Board of Studies, Classroom Assessment Resource Stage 3: Module 3 Seeing the meaning
    • Discussion Framework
    • What is happening in this photograph?
    • What message is being communicated?
    • How has the message been constructed? Think about: -The Camera Angle -The use of colour -Objects in the picture, their size and position
    • Written Response with discussion
    • How do you think the photographer wants you to respond to this picture?
    • Are you influenced in some way?
    • Describe the ways the pictures support the written text placed in relation to the image?
    • Why do you think it has been done this way?
    • Describe the ways the picture don’t support the written text.
    • What effect does this have on you the reader?
    Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 13. Work samples – Assessment 1 Example: B - High Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 14. Work samples – Assessment 1 Example: C - Sound Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 15. Work samples – Assessment 1 Example: D - Basic Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 16. Cycle One - Overview Assessment Outcomes and Indicators – English Syllabus RS3.5 Reading and viewing texts Reads independently an extensive range of texts with increasing content demands and responds to themes and issues *Understands a more complex expository text *Interprets a factual text *Reads a text demanding a degree of technicality and abstraction RS3.7 Context and text Understands that texts are constructed by people and identifies ways in which texts differ according to their purpose, audience and subject matter *explains techniques used by the writer and illustrator to represent a point of view and position the reader *identifies how camera angle, viewer position, colour, size and shading in a visual text construct meaning *justifies opinions about the motives and feelings of characters in literary texts Board of Studies, Classroom Assessment Resource Stage 3: Module 3 Seeing the meaning, ‘Outrageous Reactions’ Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 17. Cycle One - Reflection Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904 Strengths Weaknesses Where to next? Technology Student classify and identify Resources   Questioning Students response from own experiences Modelling meta-language   Students justifying their interpretation Continue modelling meta-language   Incorporate focus lessons Further assessments     Group tasks  
  • 18. Cycle Two Achieve specific outcomes and indicators from the English Syllabus Implement focused activities ‘The Rabbits’ by John Marsden and Illustrations by Shaun Tan Observe students ability to apply knowledge from Cycle 1 Aims Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 19. Findings – Observation: Lessons and activities (Applying knowledge)
    • What was evident?
    • Students were able to;
    • apply meta-language to new images as well as reviewing well-known images (‘Outrageous reactions’)
    • understand and respect everyone’s different opinion and thoughts about values such as ‘freedom’
    • discuss and justifying own views in a debate
    • debate about own ideas which was sparked by visual images
    • learn from visual images about different representation of values
    Responding to ads Responding to ‘Values Pictures’ (PETA) Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 20. Findings – Assessment 2 “The Rabbits”
    • What was evident?
    • Students were able to:
    • Read and understand symbolic and literal meanings in a
    • picture book
    • Access meaning from pictures and text and refer to in discussion
    • (Use of colour, layout and composition, characterisation, how the viewer is meant to feel/see certain things)
    • Explain ways the illustrator and writer position the reader and represent a point of view
    • Discussion Framework
    • When you first saw this picture book what of story did you think it was going to be? What made you think this?
    • Now that you have read it, is it has you expected? Why, why not?
    • Is there anything you don’t understand in this text?
    • (Discuss further)
    • What is the picture book about? (Symbolic or literal)
    • Who do you think the picture book is written for?
    • What is the purpose of the picture book?
    • What caught your attention? Why?
    • Why would someone choose to read this picture book?
    Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 21. Assessment 2 “The Rabbits” Class discussion with students Written Response Summary of visual codes Field Mode Tenor Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904 What’s happening? (Is it symbolic/abstract/action…?) *Action *Message How is the relationship developed between the viewer, the image and the image maker? *Angles – Shot distance (long, medium, close) *Shot distances *Colour *Offers or demands How is the image composed? *Reading paths – lines and vectors *Layout
  • 22. Work samples – Assessment 2 “The Rabbits” Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 23. Work samples – Assessment 2 “The Rabbits” Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 24. Work samples – Assessment 2 “The Rabbits” Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 25. Cycle Two - Overview Assessment Outcomes and Indicators – English Syllabus RS3.6 Skills and strategies Uses a comprehensive range of skills and strategies appropriate to the type of text being read *uses, adjusts and combines higher order skills in decoding texts and accessing visual *Information e.g. scanning for information, examining pictures and text, reviewing parts of the text RS3.7 Context and text Understands that texts are constructed by people and identifies ways in which texts differ according to their purpose, audience and subject matter *explains techniques used by the writer and illustrator to represent a point of view and position the reader *identifies how camera angle, viewer position, colour, size and shading in a visual text construct meaning *justifies opinions about the motives and feelings of characters in literary texts Assessment task from Stage 3 Assessment Resource applied to ‘The Rabbits’ Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 26. Cycle Two - Reflection Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904 Strengths Weaknesses Where to next? Students engaged in content    Students applied prior knowledge in a range of settings Group tasks Values pictures – cultural learning activity More lessons on “The Rabbits”   Students to produce their own visual images Students reflect on their new skills in visual literacy Continue with relevant content
  • 27. Cycle Three Assess students ability in creating their own visual image Discuss with students how they feel now about reading, discussing and understanding visual images Reflect on activities of visual literacy Aims Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 28. Work Samples – Assessment 3 Producing images – Movie Poster Identity of students has been protected Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 29. Work Samples – Assessment 3 Producing images – Movie Poster Identity of students has been protected Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 30. Cycle Three – Overview & Reflections Assessment task from Stage 3 COGS Unit – Traditions and Heritage Assessment Outcomes and Indicators – Visual Arts VAS3.1 Investigates subject matter in an attempt to represent likeliness of things in the world *Explores historical events as subject matter for a movie poster VAS3.2 Makes artworks for different audiences, assembling materials in a variety of ways *Considers the specific requirements of an artwork (poster) to clearly convey message to an audience VAS3.3 Acknowledges that audiences respond in different ways to artworks and that there are different opinions about the values of artworks *Understands that artworks can be made for different reasons. *Recognises that an audience may have different views about the meaning of an artwork Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 31. * Need to continue visual literacy lesson s to further develop self-regulated and guided learning * Engagement by the students depended on the subject content and the task set * Further research into other areas of KLA’s such as Drama and Interactive Technology (website) * Visual literacy lessons should be incorporated into KLA’s not just as a focused lesson * Further implementation of visual literacy lessons in a main-stream class Implications for Future Practice Conclusions from ARP *Continue to incorporate visual literacy in teaching as it enhances student learning and is part of the curriculum. *Students developed meaning making skills using technical language *Increase in High ( 17% - 48%) & outstanding ( 0% - 14%) assessments results and decrease in Basic (33% to 10%) *Visual literacy skills of students needs to be developed through constructing not just discussing *Important to always give students a range of experiences when learning and developing new Skills Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 32. Bibliography Board of Studies, Creative Arts K-6, NSW Board of Studies , 1998   Board of Studies, English K-6, NSW Board of Studies , 1998   Board of Studies, ‘O utrageous Reactions’ , Classroom Assessment Resource Stage 3: Module 3 Seeing the meaning, Callow, Jon (ed.) ‘Image matters: Visual texts in the classroom’ (1999) PETA, Sydney   Kress & Van Leuween ‘Reading images, The Grammar of Visual Design’ Routledge Publishing, 1996, New York, NY   Rowan, L., Gauld, J., Cole-Adams, J., & Connolly, A., ‘Teaching Values’, Primary English Teaching Association 2007, Sydney, Australia   Simpson, Alyson, PEN 142 ‘ Visual literacy: A coded language for viewing in the classroom.‘ (2004) PETA, Sydney.   Unsworth, Len, ‘Teaching Multiliteracies across the curriculum’, Open University Press, McGraw-Hill Education, NY, 2001 Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904
  • 33. Questions ? Erika Rimes Sydney University 306 205 904