STUDENT MONITOR LLC     550 North Maple Ave., Ridgewood, NJ 07450 (201) 612-8100 www.studentmonitor.com© 201 0 - ST UD E N...
© 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed   Use P roh ib it ed
This study is based on interviewing conducted during the week of                    October 12th, 2010. The study explores...
insert confidential, proprietary questions in any study. These questions                    are available on a limited bas...
Executive Summary........................................................................................ 11Methodology .....
Time Spent With Social Networks in A Typical Week ............................................... 82Incidence of Past Year...
Ratings of Various Campus Elements .................................................................. 154Campus Admin istr...
Preferred Ways to Find Out About Produc ts And Services ...................................... 207Mobile/SmartPhone Phone ...
Attempted To Download A Pirated Textbook ........................................................ 241Downloaded A Pirated ...
© 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed   Use P roh ib it ed
This presents the results of Student Monitors Fall 2010 LIFESTYLE & MEDIA study, conductedduring the week of October 12th,...
Most students believe financial stability is attainable -        •   More than half, 56% believe they “will be financially...
SHARE OF VIEWING BY METHOD                                               DVD                              Free            ...
makeup of the television programs students watch most often changed dramatically   since last year.       •   Consistent w...
preferences. Beauty, music, celebrity gossip, sports, and news are some of the subjects   students read in magazines.   We...
National newspapers: 45%, up somewhat from last year’s 42%, read at least one       national newspaper in the past week. T...
Past Year Online Purchases                                               (Bas e = All Students)                           ...
•   Past week food and beverage related activities include: 57% ate at a fast food           restaurant off campus, 61% dr...
Weekly Hours Spent With Gaming Activities                                             (Bas e = All Students)              ...
Things That Are “In” on Campus - Rank                                            (Base = All Students)                    ...
is, without question, essential to creating programs and communications that demonstrate acomplete understanding of the st...
“Back To School Shopping”                                              (Bas e = All Students)                             ...
America and Chase are the leading issuers students interested in acquiring a VISA       or MasterCard students plan to app...
Diet Soft Drinks (35%) A beverage category skewed by female                    purchasers (29%) demonstrating a high level...
Number of Movies Rented Monthly                                           (Bas e = All Students)                          ...
SHARE OF TEXTBOOK SPENDING                                                 eTextbooks   Rented textbook s                 ...
•   Annual family household income averages $98,049 (virtually identical to last year).                                   ...
The balance of this volume includes detailed, table-by-table analyses of the findings           of this study and explores...
In person intercept based interviewing for the Fall 2010 LIFESTYLE & MEDIA study wasconducted the week of October 12th, 20...
30                                        ME T HOD OL O GY© 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , ...
TELEVISION PROGRAMS WATCHED MOST OFTEN (Q. 8; TABLES 5-7)For the sixth consecutive year, Fox’s Family Guy has maintained t...
Television Programs Watched Most Often                                                         (Bas e = All Students)     ...
Family Guy retains the top spot as most watched television program by male students at 33%,similar to last year’s 36% find...
Measured for the first time, MTV’s Jersey Shore has eclipsed longtime, female favorite Grey’sAnatomy and House. About one ...
FAVORITE TELEVISION NETWORKS (Q. 12; TABLE 11)In a follow-up question to the television programs watched most often, we as...
Favorite Television Networks                                                           (Bas e = All Students)             ...
Favorite Television Networks                                                               (Bas e = Males)                ...
Favorite Television Networks                                                             (Bas e = Fem ales)               ...
HOURS SPENT WATCHING TELEVISION BY METHOD (Q.9; TABLE 8)Respondents were provided with a list of seven different methods o...
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  1. 1. STUDENT MONITOR LLC 550 North Maple Ave., Ridgewood, NJ 07450 (201) 612-8100 www.studentmonitor.com© 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  2. 2. © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  3. 3. This study is based on interviewing conducted during the week of October 12th, 2010. The study explores the wide range of college students’ activities and interests, and is intended to help all college and young adult oriented marketers and advertisers better understand the full-time, four-year college market. Four Student Monitor studies are issued each year: in addition to the two Lifestyle & Media studies (one each spring and one each fall), there are three, in-depth, industry-specific studies (RECRUITMENT, COMPUTING & THE INTERNET and FINANCIAL SERVICES). Comments or suggestions from subscribers are welcome. These studies are intended for the private and sole use of Student Monitor subscribers only. The analyses and tabulations may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the permission of Student Monitor, LLC. Subscribers may extract relevant findings and analyses as needed for their internal use. Subscribers are required to contact Student Monitor prior to any public use, publication or broadcast of Student Monitor data or analyses. Subscriptions to Student Monitor are available on an individual study basis or for the entire portfolio of studies. Each subscriber receives one copy of each study. Additional copies are available through Student Monitor. The studies and datasets are also available electronically. Subscribers are encouraged to provide detailed feedback on question areas and other aspects of the entire program. Subscribers may also© 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  4. 4. insert confidential, proprietary questions in any study. These questions are available on a limited basis and offered first-come, first-served. Pricing for these questions depends on their complexity. Proprietary analyses and cross-tabulations of Student Monitor data are also available. In-person presentations of study findings and analyses of business implications by Student Monitor management are included in each subscription at no added cost. The Student Monitor management team can be reached by telephone at (201) 612-8100, by fax at (201) 612-1444 or, you may wish to e-mail, question@studentmonitor.com. The Student Monitor website is www.studentmonitor.com. We are available at any time to discuss study details or respond to questions. Please do not hesitate to call us. Thank you and welcome to Student Monitor!© 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  5. 5. Executive Summary........................................................................................ 11Methodology .................................................................................................. 27Chapter 1 – MediaTelevision Programs Watched Most Often .............................................................. 29Favorite Television Networks ............................................................................... 33Hours Spent Watching TV by Method .................................................................... 37Online Versus Offline Television Viewing ............................................................... 40Interest in Watching Television Exclusively Online .................................................. 42Past Month Viewership of Campus TV Station ........................................................ 43Number of Times in Past Month Students Watched Campus TV S tation ..................... 44Networks Watched on Campus TV Station ............................................................. 45Readership of Last 5 Issues of Primary Campus Newspaper ..................................... 46Time Spent Reading Campus Newspaper............................................................... 48Availability/Readership of Campus Newspaper Online .............................................. 49National Newspapers Print & Online Read Weekly................................................... 50Magazine Readership.......................................................................................... 52Magazine Subscribers ......................................................................................... 55Time Spent Reading Magazines in A Typical Week .................................................. 58Chapter 2 – Students and the InternetFrequency of Internet Access............................................................................... 59Hours per Week Spent on the Internet.................................................................. 61Past Month Online Activities ................................................................................ 62Past Six Months Digital Activities .......................................................................... 70Sites Visited Since Start of Semester ..................................................................... 73 © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  6. 6. Time Spent With Social Networks in A Typical Week ............................................... 82Incidence of Past Year Online Purchases ............................................................... 83Past Year Online Purchases ................................................................................. 84Music Related Sites Visited This Semester.............................................................. 86Downloaded Unlicensed TV Shows Since Start of Semester ...................................... 89Perceived Incidence of Downloading Unlicensed TV Shows On Campus ..................... 90Downloaded Unlicensed Music or Movies since Start of Semester .............................. 91Perceived Incidence of Downloading Unlicensed Music or Movies on Campus ............. 92Attitude About Downloadin g Unlicensed Music or Movies ......................................... 93Experience With Online Courses ........................................................................... 95Chapter 3 - Activities & Interest sPast Week Activities ........................................................................................... 97Weekly Visits to Campus Locations ..................................................................... 108Campus Availability .......................................................................................... 111Number of Hours Per Week Spent on Schoolwork ................................................. 113Methods of Working With Other Students In A Group For A Class Assignment .......... 114Calendars Shared With Classmates and Professors................................................ 115Past Summer Break Activities............................................................................. 116Movie Viewing By Method ................................................................................. 117Number of Movies Rented From Specific Sources .................................................. 120Favorite Movie Type ......................................................................................... 123Chapter 4 - What s In & Whos In On CampusThings That Are “In” on Campus ........................................................................ 125Television Programs That Are “In” on Campus ..................................................... 137Chapter 5 - The Mood On Campus—Attitude s, Concerns, Timing, & PlansBiggest Problems on Campus ............................................................................. 143Agreement with Statemen ts About S tudent Debt and Curren t Affairs ....................... 145Friends Mobilized In U.S. Military Services in Support of The War in Iraq ................. 151Friends Mobilized In U.S. Military Services in Support of The War in Afghanistan ....... 152College/University Fair Value for its Cost ............................................................. 153 © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  7. 7. Ratings of Various Campus Elements .................................................................. 154Campus Admin istration’s Preparation/Reaction To N1H1 Virus ................................ 155Student Ex periences With a Friend’s Problem....................................................... 156Difference A Student Can Make On A Friend’s Recovery from a Mental Illness .......... 159Approval of the President’s Performance ............................................................. 160Approval of Congress’s Performance ................................................................... 161Political Party of Choice..................................................................................... 162Political Philosophy ........................................................................................... 163Chapter 6 - St udents A s Active ConsumersCredit Card Ownership ...................................................................................... 165Concerns About Credit Cards ............................................................................. 169Credit Cards Interested in Obtaining In Own Name in the Next Year ....................... 171Awareness of the Credit Card Act of 2009............................................................ 173Ways Students Became Aware of the Credit card Act of 2009 ................................. 175Statements Inclu ded/Though t To Be Included in the Credit Card Act of 2009 ........... 176Reaction To The Credit Card Act of 2009 ............................................................. 177Most Important Features In A Payment Card ....................................................... 179Statements About Receiving Money From Home ................................................... 183How Money Received From Home Is Used ........................................................... 185Spending & Budgets ......................................................................................... 186Agreement With Statements Abou t Money And Debt ............................................. 188Amoun t Expect To Owe In Undergraduate Student Loan Debt ................................ 195Specialty Retailers Shopped in Past Month ........................................................... 196Past Month Beverage Purchases By Segment ....................................................... 197 Regular Soft Drinks ................................................................................ 198 Diet Soft Drinks ..................................................................................... 199 Sports/Athletic Drinks ............................................................................. 200 Energy Drinks ....................................................................................... 201 Bottled Water........................................................................................ 202 Flavored/Unflavored Iced Tea.................................................................. 203Students’ Monthly S pending By Category ............................................................. 204 © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  8. 8. Preferred Ways to Find Out About Produc ts And Services ...................................... 207Mobile/SmartPhone Phone Ownership ................................................................. 209Monthly Amo unt Spen t For Mobile Service ........................................................... 210Who Pays Monthly Mobile Bill? ........................................................................... 211Current Mobile Service Provider ......................................................................... 212Brand Of Mobile Phoned Owned......................................................................... 213Plan to Purchase A New Mobile Phone In The Next 12 Months ............................... 214Type of New Phone Plan To Purchase ................................................................. 215Brand of Mobile/SmartPhone Plan To Purchase .................................................... 216Mobile Telephone Activities ............................................................................... 217Chapter 7 – Te xtbook PurchasesNumber of Textbooks Purchased This Semester ................................................... 219Number of eTextbooks Purchased This Semester.................................................. 221Number of Textbooks Rented This Semester........................................................ 222Spending For New Textbooks This Semester ........................................................ 223Spending For Used Textbooks This Semester ....................................................... 224Spending for eTextbooks This Semester .............................................................. 225Awareness of Textbook Rentals ......................................................................... 226What Would Have Purchased Instead of Renting Most Expensive Textbook Rented ... 227Plan To Rent a Textbook Next Semester.............................................................. 228Likelihood of Renting All Textbooks Next Semester ............................................... 229Spending for Rented Textbooks This Semester..................................................... 230Where Most Textbooks Were Purchased This Semester ......................................... 231Required/Recommended Textbooks Sold On A Bundled Only Basis.......................... 232Agreement With Statements Abou t Textbooks...................................................... 233Percent Of Required Textbooks Purchased........................................................... 235Reasons For Purchasing Less Than 100% Of Required Textbooks ........................... 236Awareness Of eTextbooks ................................................................................. 237Why eTextbook Was Purchased ......................................................................... 238Why eTextbook Was Not Purchased ................................................................... 239Preferred Textbook Format................................................................................ 240 © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  9. 9. Attempted To Download A Pirated Textbook ........................................................ 241Downloaded A Pirated Textbook This Semester .................................................... 242Number Of Pirated Textbooks Have Downloaded .................................................. 243Where Students Downloaded A Pirated Textbook ................................................. 244Why Students Downloaded A Pirated Textbook .................................................... 245Likelihood Of Downloading Another Pirated Textbook............................................ 246Interest In Downloading A Pirated Textbook ........................................................ 247Likelihood Of Downloading A Pirated Textbook Next Semester ............................... 248Unaided Awareness of Brand of Wireless Reading Devices ..................................... 249Aided Awareness of Brands of Wireless Reading Devices ....................................... 250Interest In Purchasing a Wireless Reading Device................................................. 251Brand of Wireless Reading Device Interested In Purchasing ................................... 252Amoun t Willing To Pay For a Wireless Reading Device........................................... 253Chapter 8 – DemographicsAge ................................................................................................................ 255College Residence ............................................................................................ 256Current Employ ment Status ............................................................................... 257How Current Job Was Found ............................................................................. 258Hours Currently Working While At School ............................................................ 259Summer Break Employment .............................................................................. 260How Summer Job Was Found ............................................................................ 261Annual Earnings ............................................................................................... 262Funds Received From Home Each Month ............................................................. 263Students’ Monthly Discretionary Spending ........................................................... 264Family’s Estimated Annual Inco me...................................................................... 265Major Course of Study ...................................................................................... 266Ethnic Backgroun d ........................................................................................... 267QuestionnaireData Tables © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  10. 10. © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  11. 11. This presents the results of Student Monitors Fall 2010 LIFESTYLE & MEDIA study, conductedduring the week of October 12th, 2010 among a representative sample of full-time undergradsat four-year colleges and universities nationwide.The findings yield important insights about the student market. We encourage all subscribersto read this comprehensive report in order to fully grasp the lifestyles, attitudes and consumerhabits of this unique and valuable group of young males and females. In addition to thedetailed findings, we also like to present to subscribers the most relevant findings, a “top line”overview.The TopicalNot surprisingly, students, like many others, find themselves confronted with the challenges ofthe current economy. • Two in three (66%) report having to face one or more financial challenges when they returned to school this semester • The most commonly reported challenges include; “Increased college costs”, (27%), “Loss or decline in family income” (23%) and “Earned less working this summer than needed/expected to” (21%). • Among the 66% reporting having to face one or more financial challenges when the returned to school this semester, the three most commonly reported ways of meeting those challenges include; “Cut back on personal spending” (42%), “Have taken or am looking for a part-time job” (30%) and “Taking more out of savings than expected to” (17%). • About six in ten (61%) believe they are receiving “fair value for cost” from their school. As might be expected, the level of satisfaction decreases with year in school and given the higher costs associated with Private schools, the level of satisfaction is lower than the level repoted by those attending Public schools. 11 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  12. 12. Most students believe financial stability is attainable - • More than half, 56% believe they “will be financially stable in the next ten years” compared to 46% who believe they “will be will be financially stable in the next five years”. • Nearly four in ten students (39%, down somewhat from 46% last year) find “it is difficult to save money”. About one in four students (26%, down somewhat from 30% last year) believe “it is difficult for me to pay off all my bills”.Most students demonstrate a responsible attitude about spending – • About a third (35%, down from 45% last year) believe “my current spending habits will not impact my future credit report” and fewer than three in ten (28%) “ I don’t worry about the way I spend or manage my money”. • More than half (52% compared to last year’s 58%) report “I like to save my money before I purchase anything”.Exactly seven in ten students (70%) expect to have student loan debt when they complete theirundergraduate studies. Among this 70%, the average student expects to have $26,000 instudent loan debt ($23,339 among students attending Public schools and $32,445 amongstudents attending Private schools).The following provides an overview of other relevant findings from the Fall 2010 study.Detailed findings and table-by-table analyses follow the Executive Summary.MediaOne of the most effective methods of reaching students is through the media. Students watchtelevision and movies, read magazines and newspapers, listen to the radio, and spend asignificant amount of time online. Additionally, because students have such diverse interests,marketers have a broad range of options available to them which they can use to reach adynamic segment of the population. The first step toward successful student marketing andadvertising lies in understanding how students interact with each type of media. TV Viewing: Less than half of the time students spend viewing television is spent viewing on a TV set (41%, down from 46% last year). The next largest share of viewing is DVD (17%). Students report spending the same amount of time viewing with a DVR as viewing via free streaming online (each 12%). No other method represents more than 6% of the time students spend viewing television. 12 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  13. 13. SHARE OF VIEWING BY METHOD DVD Free  17% streaming TV set 12% 41% Paid  online DVR 6% 12% Free file  On  sharing demand 6% 6% 73%, up somewhat from last year’s 70%) of the time students spend time viewing televisionis spent online. Among this 70%, on average half (50%48%) of all television viewing is done online. When asked how interested students would be in viewing all of their television online, about half (51%, unchanged from last year) report being at least “Somewhat interested”. Nearly one in five students (17%, also unchanged from last year) report being “Very interested” in viewing all of their television online. The television programs students watch most often are: Television Programs Watched Most Often (Bas e = All Students) F05 F06 F07 F08 F09 F10 Total Total Total Total Total Total % % % % % % Family Guy - FOX 24 20 21 20 26 23 The Office - NBC 1 4 12 11 21 17 House - FOX 5 2 11 14 19 15 Lost - ABC 9 12 4 8 8 14 ESPN SportsCenter - ESPN 12 17 11 14 11 12 Grey’s Anatomy - ABC NA 24 18 13 12 9 Glee - FOX NA NA NA NA 7 9 CSI - NBC 10 9 11 12 9 8 Desperate Housewives - ABC 11 7 6 5 7 7 Students’ varied tastes are evident in the Fall 2010 list of television programs watched most often. From Family Guy to Gossip Girl, today’s undergraduates watch and appreciate all formats of television entertainment. As seen from the table above, the 13 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY© 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  14. 14. makeup of the television programs students watch most often changed dramatically since last year. • Consistent with last year, in the top spot, Family Guy (26%) is the most watched television show among all students. Family Guy is followed by The Office (21%, double that of the last year’s finding) and FOX’s House (19%, up from 14% last year). • FOX’s Family Guy (36%), The Office (26%) and ESPN SportsCenter (22%) are the most watched television programs among male students. • ABC’s Grey’s Anatomy (22%), FOX’s House (21%) and NBC’s The Office (16%) together with FOX’s Family Guy (also 16%) are the most watched television programs among female students. • Students’ Top 5 favorite television networks are ABC (33%), MTV (29%), ESPN (29%), HBO (29%), Comedy Central (28%) and FOX (28%). Favorite Television Networks (Bas e = All Students) Total Male Female % % % MTV 27 16 37 ABC 29 23 34 Comedy Central 43 54 32 FOX 27 30 25 Food network 15 10 21 Discovery Channel 28 34 21 HBO 23 25 20 CBS 16 16 16 ESPN 30 51 9 History Channel 15 21 8 Campus TV: About one in five students (16%, virtually identical to last year) watched their campus television station in the past month and 28% of these students watched it three or more times. Magazines: More than three in ten (31% of students) report spending time reading a magazine in the past week. Students’ magazine choices are as diverse as their TV 14 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY© 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  15. 15. preferences. Beauty, music, celebrity gossip, sports, and news are some of the subjects students read in magazines. We measured net readership (the unduplicated sum of subscribers, regular readers and occasional readers) of 31 magazine titles. The leading titles are shown in the following table. Magazine Readership (Net) (Bas e = All Students) F05 F06 F07 F08 F09 F10 % % % % % % Cosmopolitan 24 21 19 18 18 19 People 17 15 16 19 18 18 Sports Illustrated 13 19 15 16 18 11 ESPN: The Magazine 11 11 11 10 12 10 TIME 11 11 14 14 14 9 Rolling Stone 11 12 13 12 11 9 Seventeen 10 9 12 10 10 9 National Geographic 8 6 9 9 10 9 Glamour 11 10 9 8 10 9 Men’s Health 6 7 10 9 10 7 The magazine preferences of males and females continue to differ with a few exceptions. The most read magazine among college males this semester is Sports Illustrated (20%). The most read magazine among college females is Cosmopolitan (35%). Students who subscribe to a magazine are the best measure of readership loyalty. The most subscribed to magazine among male students is Sports Illustrated (8%), while the most subscribed to magazine among females is Cosmopolitan (14%). Campus newspapers continue to have high readership levels. 54% of undergraduates, (down from 64% last year) read at least 1 of the last 5 issues of their campus newspaper and 24% of students are considered “frequent readers” (read 3 or more of the last 5 issues). Only 35% of all students have not read any of the last 5 issues. Student readers report spending an average of 17 minutes (also virtually identical to last year) reading a typical issue of their campus newspaper. About one in four students (26%) report their campus newspaper is available online. Among those students aware, 35%, up from 31% last year) have read their campus newspaper online at least in the past month. 15 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY© 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  16. 16. National newspapers: 45%, up somewhat from last year’s 42%, read at least one national newspaper in the past week. The most commonly read national newspaper is The New York Times read by 20% of students followed closely by USA Today, read by 15% of students. More than four in ten students (44%, up from 37% last year) read the online version of at least one national newspaper in the past week with the The New York Times again being the most read online version (22% of all students) followed by USA Today (11%).Students and the InternetCollege students are among the most computer and online literate adults nationally with nearuniversal access to the Internet. Computer ownership is now at 95% of all students (95% ofstudents own a desktop, laptop or netbook computer or some combination thereof).More than one in four students (27%, down somewhat from 32% last year) own a desktopcomputer and more students own a Dell desktop than any other brand. More than eight in tenstudents (85%, similar to last year’s 83%) own a laptop computer and more students own anApple laptop computer than any other brand of laptop computer. Only 5% own a netbook andjust 2% report owning a tablet computer.Student Monitor® studies the Internet and the personal computing category in comprehensivedetail in the annual COMPUTING & THE INTERNET study fielded every Fall. Given the impact ofthe Internet on students day-to-day lives and activities, the LIFESTYLE & MEDIA study alsoincludes select Internet-related findings from the Fall 2010 COMPUTING & THE INTERNETstudy. • Frequency of Internet usage increases, 64% of students, similar to last year’s 67%, are online three or more times daily. • Students spend an average of 18 hours weekly online. Exactly a third of students (33%) report spending more than 20 hours online in a typical week at school. • Students us e the Internet as an academic and social utility. Top online activities include “check grades” (73%), “check out someone else’s online profile” (67%) and “complete a class assignment” (59%). • In a typical week, more students (92%) visit FaceBook, more than any other social networking site. These students spend an average of 133 minutes weekly with FaceBook (144 minutes among females or 53% more time than males). • 76% of students (up from 70% last year) made an online purchase in the past year. Students spent more than $6 billion online this year on products like textbooks, travel and airline tickets, computers, and clothing (represents an average of $860 per student. Students spend more to purchase textbooks online than any other category ($1.4 billion). The following table details spending for 21 categories including incidence of students who purchased and the average amount per category (reported both as a user mean among purchases and a total mean among all students. 16 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  17. 17. Past Year Online Purchases (Bas e = All Students)  Category  Purchasers User mean  Total mean  Books (not textbooks)  31% $113 $43 CD’s  13% $60 $10 Clothing  44% $224 $118 Computer  8% $528 $59 Computer equipment  14% $119 $22 Computer softwa re  13% $105 $19 Concert/spo rts tickets  30% $128 $50 Games  14% $102 $19 Downloadable music  24% $55 $17 Downloadable video  4% $48 $3 DVD’s/videos  15% $66 $13 Electronics  18% $168 $40 Flowers  8% $66 $7 Footwear  25% $138 $44 Furniture  5% $239 $17 Kitchen/bed/bath  12% $145 $24 Sports equipment  9% $115 $14 Textbooks  46% $358 $201 Toiletries  14% $127 $24 Travel/airline tickets  19% $390 $101 Vitamins/pharmaceuticals  9% $125 $15Activities & InterestsThe understanding of students’ activities and interests will lead marketers to successful ways toreach this unique consumer group. Students participate in a wide variety of activities both onand off campus. Some activities are more passive, such as playing games on a video gameconsole system, while others are more active, such as shopping at the mall. 17 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  18. 18. • Past week food and beverage related activities include: 57% ate at a fast food restaurant off campus, 61% drank bottled water, 51% drank a regular (not diet) soft drink and 45% drank milk. • Students are using their mobile phones for more than just making phone calls: 60% sent a text message and in fact, only 24% (down from 37% last year) of the time students spend with their mobile phone is voice conversation compared to 55% of the time spent texting). • More than four in ten (43%) own a Smartphone and among those who plan to purchase a new mobile phone in the next 12 months, 66% plan to purchase a Smartphone. • 16% own a BlackBerry and 13% own an iPhone (among purchase intenders, 17% plan to purchase a BlackBerry while 22% plan to purchase an iPhone). • A third (32%, down from 38% last year identify Verizon as their mobile provider while 28% mention AT&T. • Past week entertainment activities popular among students are reading newspapers (30%), reading magazines (31%), going to the movies off campus (26%) and renting DVDs (19%). • In a typical week, nearly one in four students (38%) exercise or work out on campus and 19% work out at a local gym. • The methods students use to pay for typical weekly purchases continue to favor debit cards: 50% used a debit card in the past week while 24% used a credit card and 13% wrote a check. • Online social networking has become a top online activity for college students: 60% “logged on to a social networking site” in the past week (57% among males and 63% among females). • Large numbers of both male and female students spend a significant amount of time with a variety of different gaming activities Weekly Hours Spent With Gaming Activities (Bas e = All Students) Total Male Female Total User Male User Female User Users Hours Users Hours Users Hours % Mean % Mean % Mean Games using PC on a 45 5 41 5 51 4 website Video games on a video 71 7 81 7 55 7 game console 18 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY© 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  19. 19. Weekly Hours Spent With Gaming Activities (Bas e = All Students) Total Male Female Total User Male User Female User Users Hours Users Hours Users Hours % Mean % Mean % Mean PC games purchased, borrowed, 42 7 43 6 39 7 or downloaded Games on a handheld 32 6 32 7 32 6 video game system Games on another 51 4 49 3 55 4 mobile device Games on an instant messenger 25 4 23 4 28 5Whats “In” on Campus Items and Activities "In" on Campus The top items students said were “In” on their campus are: Things That Are “In” on Campus - Rank (Base = All Students) Total Male Female % % % Facebook 64 63 66 Text messaging 55 54 56 Drinking beer 54 56 53 Apple iPhones 52 55 48 Laptop computers 48 50 46 Working out 47 47 48 Apple iPods 46 49 43 Coffee 45 44 47 Drinking other alcohol 45 46 45 Going out to clubs/bars 42 40 44 19 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  20. 20. Things That Are “In” on Campus - Rank (Base = All Students) Total Male Female % % % Downloading music 40 45 36 BlackBerry SmartPhones 39 40 38 College football 39 43 36 What TV Programs are "In" on Campus? The top television programs students said were “In” on their campus are: Television Programs That Are “In” on Campus - Rank (Base = All Students) Total Male Female % % % Family Guy - FOX 52 60 45 Jersey Shore - MTV 48 42 54 Glee - FOX 41 28 54 The Office - NBC 39 39 39 South Park – Comedy Central 29 35 24 MTV 25 19 32 ESPN SportsCenter - ESPN 25 35 14 Grey’s Anatomy - ABC 24 15 32 Entourage - HBO 24 25 22 CSI - NBC 21 21 21 30 Rock - NBC 20 21 20 Weeds - Showtime 20 19 21The Mood on Campus—Attitudes, Timing, Concerns and PlansCollege students are very much in touch with the world around them. From their mediabehaviors to their concern with national and world events, it is evident that students are anactive part of society with valuable opinions and beliefs. Understanding this “mood on campus” 20 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  21. 21. is, without question, essential to creating programs and communications that demonstrate acomplete understanding of the student experience. National issues are in the forefront of students’ minds and have influenced their thinking and attitudes. • Nearly six in ten students (57% and unchanged from last year) approve of President Obama’s performance compared to 31% who approve of Congress’ performance. • One in three (34%) believe “President Obama’s plans will continue to improve economic conditions”. • 65% of students (similar to last year’s 67% year and up from 57% three years ago) believe “It is important to pursue alternative energy sources to reduce dependency on petroleum”. • About one in three students (32% compared to last year’s 36%) say “I support President Obama’s plan to increase the presence of U.S. military forces in Afghanistan”. • As the cost of higher education continues to increase, students have a growing concern about their student loan debt. About one in three (32% and virtually identical to last year) say “I have more personal student loan debt than I am comfortable with”. • About three in ten students (29%, compared to last year’s 33%) agree with the statement “Time I should be spending on schoolwork, I now spending worrying about money”.Students a s Active ConsumersKey findings regarding students consumer activities and attitudes are as follows: • “Back To School Shopping” Students report spending $2.8 billion for six product categories ranging from a low of $245 million for computer related items to a high of $910 million for clothing. “Back To School Shopping” (Bas e = All Students) Total Purchasers Total User Spending % Mean Mean (Millions) Clothing 72 $130 $171 $910 21 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  22. 22. “Back To School Shopping” (Bas e = All Students) Total Purchasers Total User Spending % Mean Mean (Millions) Furnishings 51 $83 $154 $581 Footwear 64 $73 $113 $511 Mobile/Smartphone 25 $43 $154 $301 Electronics 32 $41 $126 $287 Computer related 13 $35 $223 $245 • Campus Cards Nearly four in ten (37%) report owning a Campus Card. 74% of these students report their Campus Card has stored value feature and 39% of these students use their Campus Card daily to make purchases. Students with a Campus Card spend an average of $108 monthly with their card with 81% of that spendin g done on campus. • Credit Card Ownership Owning a credit card represents an essential step toward students’ financial independence. When students own a credit card, they are agreeing to take greater responsibility for managing their own affairs and, understandably, credit card ownership increases with class year. Nearly six in ten (51%, down from 59% last year) students have a credit card (Visa, MasterCard, Discover or American Express) and 43% (down soemwhat from 46% last year) have a credit card in their own name. Visa (31%) and MasterCard (14%) are the credit cards students have most often in their own name. One in twenty students (5%) have a Discover card in their own name compared to 3% with American Express in their own name. Virtually half of all VISA credit cards college students have in their own name are issued by Bank of America, (21%), Chase, (17%) or Wells Fargo (11%). Similarly, nearly half of all MasterCard credit cards are issued by Chase, (15%), Capital One, (13%), Citibank, (10%) or Bank of America, (8%). VISA cardholders are the least likely to cancel their card in the next 12 months (9%) while Discover cardholders are the most likely to cancel their card (21%). About one in four (23%) are interested in acquiring a credit card in their own name in the next 12 months with 57% of these students expressing an interest in VISA, 26% MasterCard, 17% American Express and 13% Discover. Bank of 22 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY© 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  23. 23. America and Chase are the leading issuers students interested in acquiring a VISA or MasterCard students plan to apply to for their card. The most commonly mentioned concerns students have about credit cards are; “Spending beyond my means” (53%), “Potential for paying someone else’s charges” (46%), “Worry about making monthly payments” (44%) and “Identify theft” (39%). Students would most prefer to use a credit card “Requiring a savings account as collateral” (29%) and least prefer to use a “Card that is an authorized user of parent’s card” (21%). • Spending and Budgets Nearly three in ten students (27%) keep track of their spending by “recording it” but a somewhat larger group (33%) and the largest share of students report “I keep my spending in my head”. One in ten (10%) report “I do not keep track of my spending”. This subject is examined in much greater detail in Student Monitors annual FINANCIAL SERVICES study fielded each Spring. • Past Month Beverage Purchases Six segments of the beverage category were examined in terms of past month purchases by brand. In addition to reporting incidence and brand purchased, students were asked if they tend to buy the same brand of these products each time or if they switch brands (an indication of brand loyalty). Key findings include: Bottled Water (72%) Seven in ten purchased bottled water in the past month with Aquafina the most commonly purchased brand. Regular Soft Drinks (72%) More than seven in ten students purchased a regular soft drink in the past month with Coke being the leading regular soft drink brand purchased (more than four times that of Pepsi). Sports/Athletic Drinks (63%) Up from last year’s 41%, students continue to purchase sports and athletic drinks, a beverage category dominated by Gatorade. Energy Drinks (44%, up from 35%) Red Bull leads the category as the most commonly purchased brand. Flavored/Unflavored Iced Tea (62%) Nearly two in three students purchased flavored or unflavored iced tea in the past month with Arizona and Snapple the two most commonly purchased brands. 23 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY© 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  24. 24. Diet Soft Drinks (35%) A beverage category skewed by female purchasers (29%) demonstrating a high level of brand loyalty for category leading Diet Coke. • Students’ Spending Habits We asked students how much they spend in a typical month across seven different categories: Monthly Spending – Selected Categories (All students) F ‘06 F ‘07 F ‘08 F ‘09 F ‘10 Total Total Total Total Total $ $ $ $ $ Eating off campus 86 72 72 64 74 Eating on campus 52 57 59 55 64 Entertainment (movies, concerts, magazines) 38 29 37 31 44 School supplies 16 14 17 13 24 Video games 14 8 10 8 10 Books (hard/soft cover, not for class) 13 13 11 11 14 Music (CDs, tapes, etc.) 12 9 13 8 6• High levels of monthly shopping at specialty retailers are reported. More than four in ten females (56%) report shopping at Forever 21 followed by Victoria’s Secret (45%). The specialty retailers visited most often among males are American Eagle (34%), and Old Navy (23%).• Renting movies is a popular form of entertainment. More than three in ten students (32%) report renting an average of 2.4 movies a month from Redbox and about one in four (26%) report renting an average of 3.5 movies from Netflix.Students spend more than $758 million every month to rent, purchase or watch movies in a typical month. Students spend more than twice as much renting a DVD from a kiosk or store or purchasing a DVD than watching a movie in a theater ($334 million compared to $151 million watching a movie in a theater). 24 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY© 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  25. 25. Number of Movies Rented Monthly (Bas e = All Students) Renters User % Mean Redbox 32 2.4 NetFlix 26 3.5 Blockbuster retail store 13 3.3 Local off campus outlet 9 2.8 Apple iTunes 8 1.9 On campus outlet 6 2.0 Amazon Video On Demand 5 2.2 Apple TV 3 2.0 Blockbuster Online 4 5.2 Cinema Now.com 3 3.0 MovieClub.com 3 2.2 MovieFlix.com 3 1.7 MovieLink.com 3 1.5 Real.com 3 1.5 Starz’s Vongo.com 3 1.5Students and Tex tbooks • The average student spent $159 for new, printed textbooks and $124 for used, printed textbooks for the Fall 2010 semester, purchasing an average of 4.5 printed textbooks. • For the Fall 2010 semester, 69%, down from 78% last year, purchased at least one new, printed textbook, 76%, down from 81% last year purchased at least one used, printed textbook, 10% (virtually identical to last year’s 9%) purchased at least one eTextbook and 20% (more than twice that of last year’s 9%) rented one or more textbooks. • Nearly four in ten (39%) are at least “Somewhat likely” to rent one or more of their textbooks next semester (Spring 2011). 25 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  26. 26. SHARE OF TEXTBOOK SPENDING eTextbooks Rented textbook s $8 $27 3% 8% New printed Used printed textbooks textbook s $159 $124 50% 39% • On an unaided basis, 74% of students are unable to identify any brand of wireless reading device (33% mention Kindle, 31% mention the iPad and 5% mention Nook). • Among the 74% unable to identify any brand of wireless reading device on an unaided basis, 86%, up from 41% last year, are able to identify one or more brands on an aided basis. Apple’s iPad has the highest levels of aided awareness (78%). • 7% of students report owning a wireless reading device (iPad is the leading brand owned) and 30% are interested in purchasing a wireless reading device (nearly one in five students, 19% or 1.3 million are interested in purchasing an iPad, more than twice that of the 9% expressing an interested in purchasing a Kindle.DemographicsAmong the four-year full-time undergraduates in this study: • The average age is 20.5. • 76% (virtually identical to last year’s 74%) worked during the past summer break (26% full-time and 37% part-time). • More than half of undergrads (56%, compared to last year’s 51%) work during the school year. Eight percent work full-time and 42% are work part-time. Those who worked full-time during the school year worked an average of 33 hours and those who worked part-time worked an average of 16 hours per week. • Students earned an average of $4,900 (up 21% from last year’s $4,035) during the past year. Males report earning 24% more than females ($5,421 compared to $4,388 among females) while Seniors report significantly higher personal earnings than Freshmen ($6,266 comnpared to $3,548). • 61% receive money from home, averaging $242 monthly. • Monthly discretionary spending averages $173 per student and projects nationally to more than $1.2 billion per month. 26 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  27. 27. • Annual family household income averages $98,049 (virtually identical to last year). 27 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY© 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  28. 28. The balance of this volume includes detailed, table-by-table analyses of the findings of this study and explores the implications of each question. There are eight chapters: 1. Media 2. Students and the Internet 3. Activities and Interests 4. Whats In and Whos In on Campus 5. The Mood on Campus—Attitudes, Timing, Concerns and Plans 6. Students as Active Consumers 7. Textbook Purchases 8. DemographicsA copy of the survey questionnaire, as well, as the full tabular results of the study are providedat the back of this volume.Subscribers are urged to review our findings and participate in on-site presentations. Theresearch team welcomes your feedback, whether in terms of alternative interpretations ofresults, new question areas or other ways we can make Student Monitor work harder for youand your college business. Welcome to Student Monitor Fall 2010 LIFESTYLE & MEDIA!Eric Weil, Managing PartnerDecember 2010(201) 612-8100weil@studentmonitor.com 28 E XECUTIVE S UMMARY © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  29. 29. In person intercept based interviewing for the Fall 2010 LIFESTYLE & MEDIA study wasconducted the week of October 12th, 2010 among a total of 1,200 college students enrolled infour-year colleges and universities throughout the United States. All interviewing wasconducted on campus by professional survey researchers.Respondents were qualified as undergraduate full-time students. Quotas were established toinsure equal numbers of males and females within each graduating class. The actual number ofinterviews completed is as follows: Completed Interviews by Gender and Year in School Male Female Total Freshman 150 150 300 Sophomore 150 150 300 Junior 150 150 300 Senior 150 150 300 Total 600 600 1,200Quotas were also established to insure adequate representation based on school location(North, South, Midwest and West), type of school (Public or Private), and enrollment size. Completed Interviews by Region, School Type and School Size Under 5,000 to 10,000 to 15,000 or 5,000 9,999 14,999 greater Total North 132 84 48 12 276 South 156 108 72 60 396 Midwest 96 72 36 120 324 West 60 48 48 48 204 Total 444 312 204 240 1,200 Public 144 264 180 240 828 Private 300 48 24 0 372 Total 444 312 204 240 1,200 29 ME T HOD OL O GY © 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  30. 30. 30 ME T HOD OL O GY© 201 0 - ST UD E NT MO NIT O R® , All R ig h t s R es erv ed , Un autho r iz ed Use P roh ib it ed
  31. 31. TELEVISION PROGRAMS WATCHED MOST OFTEN (Q. 8; TABLES 5-7)For the sixth consecutive year, Fox’s Family Guy has maintained the top spot as the mostwatched television program among students. Family Guy is mentioned by more than twice asmany males as females (33% of males compared to 13% of females).Displacing last year’s second place NBC’s The Office (and now tied for third place) Fox’sHouse, mentioned by 17% of respondents, down somewhat from last year’s record high of19% of students.The Office and MTV’s Jersey Shore are tied for third place, each mentioned by 15% ofstudents. Jersey Shore is mentioned more by females (21%) than by males (less than halfthat of females at 9%). NBC’s The Office is favored by nearly as many females (13%) as males(16%).ESPN’s SportsCenter is tied for fourth place with Comedy Central’s South Park (each 12%).As would be expected, SportCenter’s strength is with males (22%) as is South Park (18%).No other program is mentioned by more than 9% of respondents.From a network perspective, as shown on the following page, among the programs mentionedby at least 6% of students watched most often are FOX (4 of 11 programs), MTV and NBC (2programs each) lead. 31 C h ap t er 1 – ME D IA © 2 0 1 0 – S T U D E N T MO N IT O R ® L L C , A l l R ig h t s R e s e r v e d , U n a u t h o r iz e d U s e P r o h ib it e d
  32. 32. Television Programs Watched Most Often (Bas e = All Students) F05 F06 F07 F08 F09 F10 Total Total Total Total Total Total % % % % % % Family Guy - FOX 24 20 21 20 26 23 House - FOX 5 2 11 14 19 17 Jersey Shore - MTV NA NA NA NA NA 15 The Office - NBC 1 4 12 11 21 15 ESPN SportsCenter - ESPN 12 17 11 14 11 12 South Park – Comedy Central 6 7 7 9 9 12 Glee - FOX NA NA NA NA 7 9 Grey’s Anatomy - ABC NA 24 18 13 12 9 CSI - NBC 10 9 11 12 9 7 The Simpsons - FOX 18 17 13 11 9 7 Teen Mom - MTV NA NA NA NA NA 6 30 Rock - NBC NA NA NA 1 5 5 Desperate Housewives - ABC 11 7 6 5 7 5 Dexter - Showtime NA NA NA 3 5 5 Entourage- HBO 1 2 3 7 6 5 Gossip Girl - CW NA NA NA 9 8 5 How I Met Your Mother - Lifetime NA NA NA 2 2 5 Lost - ABC 9 12 4 8 8 5 Modern Family - ABC NA NA NA NA 1 5 MTV - MTV 6 9 6 5 3 5 NCIS - CBS NA NA 1 1 4 5 32 C h ap t er 1 – ME D IA© 2 0 1 0 – S T U D E N T MO N IT O R ® L L C , A l l R ig h t s R e s e r v e d , U n a u t h o r iz e d U s e P r o h ib it e d
  33. 33. Family Guy retains the top spot as most watched television program by male students at 33%,similar to last year’s 36% finding. More than four in ten male Juniors (41%), and 43% of malesattending schools in the North, identify Family Guy as the television program they watch mostoften.The remaining Top 4 include The Office (16% and down sharply from last year’s 26% finding)ESPN SportsCenter (22%, identical to last year), South Park (18%, similar to last year’s16%) and House, (17%, up somewhat from last year’s 15%) follow. No other program ismentioned by more than 10% of male respondents.Compared the last year, no notable gainers among males are seen.Compared to last year, The Office (16% down and 26%) and The Simpsons (10%, downfrom 15% last year) reflect the most notable year to year declines among males. Top 10 Television Programs Watched Most Often (Bas e = Males) F05 F06 F07 F08 F09 F10 % % % % % % Family Guy - Fox 32 31 28 28 36 33 ESPN SportsCenter - ESPN 23 28 22 25 22 22 South Park – Comedy Central 10 12 11 15 16 18 House - Fox NA 2 10 15 17 17 The Office - NBC 1 5 12 12 26 16 The Simpsons - Fox 25 26 18 16 15 10 Jersey Shore NA NA NA NA NA 9 Lost - ABC 9 12 4 8 11 7 Entourage - HBO 1 2 4 10 9 7 CSI - NBC 11 9 11 10 9 7 33 C h ap t er 1 – ME D IA © 2 0 1 0 – S T U D E N T MO N IT O R ® L L C , A l l R ig h t s R e s e r v e d , U n a u t h o r iz e d U s e P r o h ib it e d
  34. 34. Measured for the first time, MTV’s Jersey Shore has eclipsed longtime, female favorite Grey’sAnatomy and House. About one in five females (21%) mention Jersey Shore including 38% offemale Freshmen and 38% of female Asian-Americans.In second place, Grey’s Anatomy is mentioned by 18% (down from 22% last year). Glee andHouse share the third place position (each 17%) with Glee reflecting a significant gain (upfrom 10% last year) and House something of a decline (down from 21%).The Office and Family Guy are tied for fourth place at 13% of females (each down somewhatfrom 16%. Teen Mom occupies fifth place at 11% (new this year).Gossip Girl (10%, down from 14% last year and down from 18% two years ago) follows insixth place.No other program is mentioned by more than 9% of females respondents.Compared to last year, notable gainers among females are certainly Jersey Shore (from nothingto first place at 21%) and to a lesser extenr Glee at 17%, up +7 from 10% last year).Notable declines among female viewers include Grey’s Anatomy and Gossip Girl (each -4compared to last year). Top 10 Television Programs Watched Most Often (Bas e = Fem ales) F05 F06 F07 F08 F09 F10 % % % % % % Jersey Shore - MTV NA NA NA NA NA 21 Grey’s Anatomy - ABC NA 37 28 21 22 18 Glee - FOX NA NA NA NA 10 17 House - Fox NA 2 11 12 21 17 Family Guy - Fox 16 10 14 10 16 13 The Office - NBC 1 3 11 11 16 13 Teen Mom - MTV NA NA NA NA NA 11 Gossip Girl - CW NA NA NA 18 14 10 Desperate Housewives - ABC 19 12 11 11 12 9 CSI - NBC 10 10 12 14 8 7 How I Met Your Mother - Lifetime NA NA NA NA 3 7 34 C h ap t er 1 – ME D IA © 2 0 1 0 – S T U D E N T MO N IT O R ® L L C , A l l R ig h t s R e s e r v e d , U n a u t h o r iz e d U s e P r o h ib it e d
  35. 35. FAVORITE TELEVISION NETWORKS (Q. 12; TABLE 11)In a follow-up question to the television programs watched most often, we asked students toidentify their favorite television networks. For the most part, the results mirror the mostwatched television shows based on the networks the shows air on.By a wide margin Comedy Central (43%, including 54% of males) is the top televisionnetwork. ESPN (30%, including 51% of males) and ABC (29%, including 34% among females)follow.Closely following third place ABC, 28% of respondents mention Discovery Channel (28%),and 27% mention FOX and MTV (also 27%).In sixth place, HBO is mentioned by 23% of respondents. No other network is mentioned bymore than 16% of respondents.Among male respondents, the Top 5 Favorite Television Networks are; Comedy Central (43%,up from 36% last year), ESPN (51%, up from 48%), Discovery Channel (35%, up from22%), FOX (30% compared to 33% last year), and HBO, (26%, down from 33% last year).Among females, the Top 5 Favorite Television Networks are; MTV (37%, compared to 36% lastyear), ABC (34%, compared to 40% last year), Comedy Central (32%, up sharply from 20%last year), FOX (25%, virtually identical to last year) and E! (23%, nearly twice that of lastyear’s 13%). 35 C h ap t er 1 – ME D IA © 2 0 1 0 – S T U D E N T MO N IT O R ® L L C , A l l R ig h t s R e s e r v e d , U n a u t h o r iz e d U s e P r o h ib it e d
  36. 36. Favorite Television Networks (Bas e = All Students) Total Male Female % % % Comedy Central 43 54 32 ESPN 30 51 9 ABC 29 23 34 Discovery Channel 28 35 21 FOX 27 30 25 MTV 27 16 37 HBO 23 26 20 CBS 16 16 16 History Channel 15 21 8 The Food Network 15 10 21 ABC Family 14 6 22 NBC 14 15 13 BET 13 10 15 E! 13 3 23 FX 13 16 9 Animal Planet 12 10 15 CNN 12 15 9 USA 12 11 14 Bravo 11 4 18 CW 11 5 16 ESPN2 11 19 2 A&E 10 9 11 Cartoon Network 10 10 9 Lifetime 10 8 18 TNT 10 10 9 National Geographic 9 11 8 Sci-Fi 9 11 6 Showtime 9 8 11 VH1 8 5 12 TLC 7 1 13 Spike TV 6 9 3 TBS Superstation 5 6 5 ESPNews 4 8 0 MSNBC 3 4 3 MTV2 3 3 4 NFL Network 2 5 <1 Nick at Night 2 <1 5 Starz 2 2 3 mtvU 1 <1 1 VH1 Classic 1 1 <1 36 C h ap t er 1 – ME D IA© 2 0 1 0 – S T U D E N T MO N IT O R ® L L C , A l l R ig h t s R e s e r v e d , U n a u t h o r iz e d U s e P r o h ib it e d
  37. 37. Favorite Television Networks (Bas e = Males) Total Male Female % % % Comedy Central 43 54 32 ESPN 30 51 9 Discovery Channel 28 35 21 FOX 27 30 25 HBO 23 26 20 ABC 29 23 34 History Channel 15 21 8 ESPN2 11 19 2 CBS 16 16 16 FX 13 16 9 MTV 27 16 37 CNN 12 15 9 NBC 14 15 13 National Geographic 9 11 8 Sci-Fi 9 11 6 USA 12 11 14 Animal Planet 12 10 15 BET 13 10 15 Cartoon Network 10 10 9 The Food Network 15 10 21 TNT 10 10 9 A&E 10 9 11 Spike TV 6 9 3 ESPNews 4 8 0 Lifetime 10 8 18 Showtime 9 8 11 ABC Family 14 6 22 TBS Superstation 5 6 5 CW 11 5 16 NFL Network 2 5 <1 VH1 8 5 12 Bravo 11 4 18 MSNBC 3 4 3 E! 13 3 23 MTV2 3 3 4 Starz 2 2 3 mtvU 1 <1 1 Nick at Night 2 <1 5 TLC 7 1 13 VH1 Classic 1 1 <1 37 C h ap t er 1 – ME D IA© 2 0 1 0 – S T U D E N T MO N IT O R ® L L C , A l l R ig h t s R e s e r v e d , U n a u t h o r iz e d U s e P r o h ib it e d
  38. 38. Favorite Television Networks (Bas e = Fem ales) Total Male Female % % % MTV 27 16 37 ABC 29 23 34 Comedy Central 43 54 32 FOX 27 30 25 E! 13 3 23 ABC Family 14 6 22 Discovery Channel 28 35 21 The Food Network 15 10 21 HBO 23 26 20 Bravo 11 4 18 Lifetime 10 8 18 CBS 16 16 16 CW 11 5 16 Animal Planet 12 10 15 BET 13 10 15 USA 12 11 14 NBC 14 15 13 TLC 7 1 13 VH1 8 5 12 A&E 10 9 11 Showtime 9 8 11 Cartoon Network 10 10 9 CNN 12 15 9 ESPN 30 51 9 FX 13 16 9 TNT 10 10 9 History Channel 15 21 8 National Geographic 9 11 8 Sci-Fi 9 11 6 Nick at Night 2 <1 5 TBS Superstation 5 6 5 MTV2 3 3 4 MSNBC 3 4 3 Spike TV 6 9 3 Starz 2 2 3 ESPN2 11 19 2 mtvU 1 <1 1 NFL Network 2 5 <1 VH1 Classic 1 1 <1 ESPNews 4 8 0 38 C h ap t er 1 – ME D IA© 2 0 1 0 – S T U D E N T MO N IT O R ® L L C , A l l R ig h t s R e s e r v e d , U n a u t h o r iz e d U s e P r o h ib it e d
  39. 39. HOURS SPENT WATCHING TELEVISION BY METHOD (Q.9; TABLE 8)Respondents were provided with a list of seven different methods of watching television andasked to identify, in a typical week, which of these methods they use to watch television andhow many hours they watch television using each of the seven methods.The table on the following page summarizes the share of students using each method and theaverage number of hours spent weekly with each method watching television.Not surprisingly, more than eight in ten students (83%, down from 88% last year) reportwatching television in the past week on a television set, the most common method, andspending an average of 8 hours a week using this method. Nearly six in ten respondents (57%,down somewhat from 62% last year) report watching a DVD, spending an average of 4 hoursweekly with this method.Free, streaming online is the next most commonly mentioned method of watching televisionand is mentioned by nearly half of students (48%, up somewhat from last year’s 45%),averaging 4 hours weekly watching television with this method.Paid online continues to be the least commonly reported method and is mentioned by aboutone in twelve students (8%). Students who watch paid online watch for an average of 6 hoursweekly. 39 C h ap t er 1 – ME D IA © 2 0 1 0 – S T U D E N T MO N IT O R ® L L C , A l l R ig h t s R e s e r v e d , U n a u t h o r iz e d U s e P r o h ib it e d

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