Users, experience, and beyond (EuroIA 2011, Prague)
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Users, experience, and beyond (EuroIA 2011, Prague)

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For several years, my company has used a simple model for defining, aligning, choreographing, measuring and enhancing UX by analysing a range of touchpoints across both online and offline experiences. ...

For several years, my company has used a simple model for defining, aligning, choreographing, measuring and enhancing UX by analysing a range of touchpoints across both online and offline experiences. Each of these represents an interaction between the “user” and the “brand/company/service/whatever”. We have also defined an “ergonomics of need” which consists of five key points: Attitude, Expectation, Schedule, Environment, Origin. All of these points ultimately influence the importance and user perception of individual interactions and tasks. Taken in its entirety: model, ergonomics, and measurement tools, our framework makes it easy to put something as abstract as “user experience” into more practical, hands-on terms.

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Users, experience, and beyond (EuroIA 2011, Prague) Users, experience, and beyond (EuroIA 2011, Prague) Presentation Transcript

  • Users, experiences, and beyond Eric Reiss @elreiss EuroIA September 24, 2011 Prague, Czech Republic
  • I would like to share: a model that helps us understand needs and responses a practical definition of user experience a tool to help identify, quantify, and prioritise key UX touchpoints
  • us·er noun 1: a person who makes use of a thing;someone who uses or employs something 2: a person who uses something or someone selfishly or unethically 3: a person who takes drugs
  • ex·per·i·ence noun1: having been affected by or learnedthrough observation or participation 2: the length of such participation
  • Eric’s 1st Law of UX:If a site does not solve youruser’s problems, it will notsolve your company’s either.
  • So, let’s start with the user
  • When would you use (simultaneously): An ergonomic seat designed for one person Optical lenses invented by Benjamin Franklin Alcoholic mixture invented by Dr. Iain Marshall Incandescent device invented by Thomas Edison Fabric made on a loom invented by JM Jacquard Rouge Royale (marble) Baskerville Light (typography) Domesticated mammal (This is often how our clients look at their content)
  • When would you use (in simpler terms): Armchair Bifocal eyeglasses Manhattan Cocktail Lightbulb Wool pullover Tabletop Book Cat (This is an easier way to look at content)
  • Lightbulb Eyeglasses Wool pullover BookManhattan Cocktail Armchair Gus the Cat Marble tabletop
  • Sensory assistance Sensory assistance Warmth/comfort Education/informationChemical stimuli Convenience/comfort CompanionshipConvenience/comfort
  • Needs are always situational!
  • What are the needs of your users?
  • Historically, we looked at physical needs...
  • “Rys ergonomji czyli nauki o pracy,opartej na prawdach Poczerpniętych z Nauki Przyrody” “The Outline of Ergonomics, i.e. Science of Work, Based on the Truths Taken from the Natural Science” 1857Wojciech Jastrzębowski Henry Dreyfuss
  • Henry Dreyfuss Alphonse BertillonWojciech Jastrzębowski
  • Henry Dreyfuss “Joe”
  • These measurements helpeddesign everything in the photo (well, not Gus the Cat)
  • “Cognitive ergonomics” “Neuroergonomics”This is NOT just about improving well-being and system performance
  • Copyright could not be traced. Used for educational purposes only.
  • A thought...If ergonomics, anthropometrics, and human factors deal with physical requirements, is it possible to map similar requirements for cognitive functions?
  • The Ergonomics of Need“Moving from three dimensions to five”
  • Everything starts in neutral Positive Attitude Negative Positive Expectation Negative Leisurely Schedule Urgent Relaxed Environment Stressful Personal Origin External
  • The ergonomics of need - AESEO Attitude a Expectation Schedule Environment Origin
  • Planning a personal vacation Positive Attitude Negative Positive Expectation Negative Leisurely Schedule Urgent Relaxed Environment Stressful Personal Origin External
  • Need help with taxes Positive Attitude Negative Positive Expectation Negative Leisurely Schedule Urgent Relaxed Environment Stressful Personal Origin External
  • Planning the boss’ vacation Positive Attitude Negative Positive Expectation Negative Leisurely Schedule Urgent Relaxed Environment Stressful Personal Origin External
  • An introduction to experience design
  • ex·per·i·ence noun1: having been affected by or learnedthrough observation or participation 2: the length of such participation
  • Eric’s 2nd Law of UX:User experience is the sum ofa series of interactions betweenpeople, devices, and events.
  • Eric’s 3rd Law of UX:There are three types of interaction:active, passive and secondary
  • Eric’s 4th Law of UX:UX design represents the consciousact of coordinating interactions,acknowledging interactions, andreducing negative interactions.
  • Three types of interaction: Active (things we control) Passive (things we don’t control) Secondary (things that have indirect influence)
  • Active interaction Photo courtesy of: musthavemenus.com
  • Active interactionCopyright could not be traced. Used for educational purposes only.
  • Passive interaction (partly)Photo courtesy of: johnmariani.com
  • Passive interactionPhoto by Massimiliano Uccelletti, photonet.com
  • Secondary interactionPhoto courtesy of: koit.radiotown.com
  • Secondary interactionPhoto courtesy of: tomatolover.com
  • UX design combines all three activites Coordinating interactions that we can control Acknowledging interactions beyond our control Reducing negative interactions
  • Coordinating interactions Photos courtesy of: Brooklyn Public Library, shipwrightsarms.com.au
  • Coordinating interactions Photo courtesy of: capetownwineblog.com
  • Coordinating interactions Photo courtesy of: Rootology under Wikipedia Commons License
  • Acknowledging interactions Photo courtesy of: TinyFarmBlog.com
  • Reducing negative interactionsPhoto courtesty of: kenlevine.blogspot.com
  • Reducing negative interactionsPhoto courtesy of: marchedimanche.typepad.com
  • Reducing negative interactionsPhoto courtesy of Andrew Sullivan
  • Mapping and evaluating
  • Mental modelSource: boxesandarrows.com / Indie Young
  • Customer journey mapSource: www.thisisservicedesignthinking.comConcept and design: Marc Stickdorn & Jacob Schneider
  • Step 1: research Contextual enquiry Interviews Focus groups Surveys and feedback forms Personal observation
  • Step 2: prepare a scenario (X-log) Write down all possible touchpoints  Use file cards or stickies Arrange them so they create a linear flow Tell the story to a colleague (without manus)  This will show you where you need to fix the story
  • Step 3: write scenario (X-log)My family (my wife, myself, and our two kids) decided to go to the movies. We checked the internetand found the website for our local cinema complex after a quick search on Google. But we had toclick three times to get to the program page and wait through a silly animated ad for a movie thathadn’t even been released yet. Worse still, we were forced to download a pdf to find out the specificmovie names and playing times. And after all that, we couldn’t even order tickets online, much lesspurchase them, so we couldn’t avoid waiting in line when we arrived. You’d think a big four-screencomplex would have a more sophisticated website. But we did find out what was showing, decided tosee the latest Harry Potter movie, and piled into the car.Finding a parking place was easy. The theater has a big lot, which is important since driving to thisparticular theater is really our only option. Just as we were leaving the car, it really started to rain, buthappily, the entrance wasn’t far away.There were three ticket windows open, so the lines were short. The girl behind the counter was noisilychewing gum and barely looked up during the entire transaction. In fact, she didn’t say a single word tome except to ask for the money. Wow, prices have really increased this past year. I was surprised athow expensive it was.The lobby was inviting and quite clean. We bought popcorn and soda at the concession and found ourway to our particular auditorium. It was easy to spot the signs pointing the way. As we approached, wenoticed overflowing trashcans with popcorn and other garbage from previous audiences.The seats were well-marked and easy to find. The seating was comfortable but there was old popcornunderfoot. The temperature in the room was pleasant, although all of the wet people made it get a littlesteamy. The sound was great and really enhanced the special effects, so we really enjoyed the movie.When we left, there was a nice usher, who opened the exits and wished us a pleasant evening as wewent out. And it had stopped raining. A nice end to a nice family outing.
  • Step 4: scenario markupMy family (my wife, myself, and our two kids) decided to go to the movies. We checked the internet 1and found the website for our local cinema complex after a quick search on Google. But we had to 2 3click three times to get to the program page and wait through a silly animated ad for a movie that 4 5hadn’t even been released yet. Worse still, we were forced to download a pdf to find out the specificmovie names and playing times. And after all that, we couldn’t even order tickets online, much lesspurchase them, so we couldn’t avoid waiting in line when we arrived. You’d think a big four-screen 5acomplex would have a more sophisticated website. But we did find out what was showing, decided tosee the latest Harry Potter movie, and piled into the car.Finding a parking place was easy.6 7 The theater has a big lot, which is important since driving to this 8particular theater is really our only option. Just as we were leaving the car, it really started to rain, buthappily, the entrance wasn’t far away. 9 10There were three ticket windows open, so the lines were short. The girl behind the counter was noisilychewing gum and barely looked up during the entire transaction. In fact, she didn’t say a single word to 11 12me except to ask for the money. Wow, prices have really increased this past year. I was surprised athow expensive it was.13The lobby was inviting and quite clean. We bought popcorn and soda 15 concession and found our 14 at the 16 17way to our particular auditorium. It was easy to spot the signs pointing the way. As we approached, we 18noticed overflowing trashcans with popcorn and other garbage from previous audiences.The seats were well-marked and easy to find.19 seating was comfortable but there was old popcorn The 20underfoot.21 temperature in the room was pleasant,22 The although all of the wet people made it get a little 23steamy. The sound was great and really enhanced the special effects, so we really enjoyed the movie.25 24 whoWhen we left, there was a nice usher, 25 opened the exits and wished us a pleasant evening as we 26went out. And it had stopped raining. A nice end to a nice family outing.26a
  • Step 5: snapshot identification1. Find website on internet2. Click three times to find relevant page on site3. Reaction to irrelevant animation4. Find schedule (download PDF)5. Reaction to lack of purchasing options5a. Opinion of website6. Park car7. Reaction to parking lot8. Reaction to rain9. Reaction to proximity of parking to entrance10. Reaction to short line11. Reaction to rude ticketseller12. Buy tickets13. Reaction to ticket prices14. Reaction to lobby15. Buy popcorn and soda16. Find auditorium17. React to overfilled trashcans18. Find seats19. Reaction to seats20. Reaction to popcorn on floor21. Reaction to temperature22. Reaction to steaminess23. Reaction to sound24. Reaction to movie25. Reaction to nice usher26. Reaction to dry weather26a. Opinion of eveningNote that opinions are not really interactions, hence we have 5a and 26a.
  • Step 6: quantitative evaluation1. Mark each individual interaction - we call these “snapshots”2. Assign a value from 1 to 3 to each snapshot in relation to its contribution to the overall experience3. Grade the experience on a scale from -3 to +3 +3 = fantastic +2 = good +1 = better than expected 0 = no effect on the ultimate user experience (interaction to be ignored?) -1 = poor -2 = awful -3 = mission critical4. Multiply the value by the grade to get a score (this is the really useful number)5. Note any events that are recurring, unique, or may be influenced by chronology (cause and effect relationships).Snapshot Value Grade Score Repeat Unique ChronoRe. to steaminess 1 -1 -1 ? Y Y
  • Step 6: quantitative evaluation
  • Step 6a: quantitative evaluation Cleaning/climate Website Rude behaviour
  • Step 6: some tips Do this with your clients  It lets them participate actively  It helps start a useful dialogue You can do this with a group, too  It’s a good workshop task  Try to remain neutral. Guide, don’t dictate. Refer back to the Ergonomics of Need if you are uncertain as to the Value rating to give something
  • Step 7: analysis Lack of online purchasing options is a key issue. Website has serious problems in general. Snapshots 11, 15, and 25 suggest that additional emphasis should be placed on customer-service training for front-line personnel. Snapshots 17 and 20 illustrate that cleaning is a problem. Snapshot 22 revealed that the climate-control system was out of whack, which proved to be an easy repair.
  • So in summary… Understand the Ergonomics of Need for key scenarios Consider “user experience” as the sum of a series of interactions Write and chart a scenario to identify, quantify, and prioritise key interactions (snapshots) Go out and make the world a better place
  • Thanks!
  • Eric Reiss can (usually) be found at:The FatDUX Group ApSStrandøre 152100 CopenhagenDenmarkOffice: (+45) 39 29 67 77Mobil: (+45) 20 12 88 44Twitter: @elreissinfo@fatdux.comwww.fatdux.com