Users, Experience, and beyond
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This my slidedeck from my presentation at UX Ukraine in Kyiv on Feb 26, 2011.

This my slidedeck from my presentation at UX Ukraine in Kyiv on Feb 26, 2011.

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Users, Experience, and beyond Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Users, experiences, and beyond Eric Reiss @elreiss UX Ukraine February 26, 2011 Kyiv, Ukraine
  • 2. us·er noun 1: a person who makes use of a thing;someone who uses or employs something 2: a person who uses something or someone selfishly or unethically 3: a person who takes drugs
  • 3. ex·per·i·ence noun1: having been affected by or learnedthrough observation or participation 2: the length of such participation
  • 4. Eric’s 1st Law of UX:If a site does not solve youruser’s problems, it will notsolve your company’s either.
  • 5. So, let’s start with the user
  • 6. When would you use (simultaneously): An ergonomic seat designed for one person Optical lenses invented by Benjamin Franklin Alcoholic mixture invented by Dr. Iain Marshall Incandescent device invented by Thomas Edison Fabric made on a loom invented by JM Jacquard Rouge Royale (marble) Baskerville Light (typography) Domesticated mammal (This is often how our clients look at their content)
  • 7. When would you use (in simpler terms): Armchair Bifocal eyeglasses Manhattan Cocktail Lightbulb Wool pullover Tabletop Book Cat (This is an easier way to look at content)
  • 8. Lightbulb Eyeglasses Wool pullover BookManhattan Cocktail Armchair Gus the Cat Marble tabletop
  • 9. Sensory assistance Sensory assistance Warmth/comfort Education/informationChemical stimuli Convenience/comfort CompanionshipConvenience/comfort
  • 10. Needs are always situational!
  • 11. What is the situation for your users?
  • 12. Historically, we looked at physical needs...
  • 13. “Rys ergonomji czyli nauki o pracy,opartej na prawdach Poczerpniętych z Nauki Przyrody” “The Outline of Ergonomics, i.e. Science of Work, Based on the Truths Taken from the Natural Science” 1857 Henry DreyfussWojciech Jastrzębowski
  • 14. Henry Dreyfuss Alphonse BertillonWojciech Jastrzębowski
  • 15. Henry Dreyfuss “Joe”
  • 16. These measurements helpeddesign everything in the photo (well, not Gus the Cat)
  • 17. “Cognitive ergonomics” “Neuroergonomics”
  • 18. Copyright could not be traced. Used for educational purposes only.
  • 19. A thought...If ergonomics, anthropometrics, and human factors deal with physical requirements, is it possible to map similar requirements for cognitive functions?
  • 20. The Ergonomics of Need“Moving from three dimensions to five”
  • 21. The ergonomics of need - AESEO Attitude a Expectation Schedule Environment Origin
  • 22. Everything starts in neutral Positive Attitude Negative Positive Expectation Negative Leisurely Schedule Urgent Relaxed Environment Stressful Personal Origin External
  • 23. Planning a personal vacation Positive Attitude Negative Positive Expectation Negative Leisurely Schedule Urgent Relaxed Environment Stressful Personal Origin External
  • 24. Need help with taxes Positive Attitude Negative Positive Expectation Negative Leisurely Schedule Urgent Relaxed Environment Stressful Personal Origin External
  • 25. Planning the boss’ vacation Positive Attitude Negative Positive Expectation Negative Leisurely Schedule Urgent Relaxed Environment Stressful Personal Origin External
  • 26. An introduction to experience design
  • 27. ex·per·i·ence noun1: having been affected by or learnedthrough observation or participation 2: the length of such participation
  • 28. Eric’s 2nd Law of UX:User experience is the sum ofa series of interactions betweenpeople, devices, and events.
  • 29. Eric’s 3rd Law of UX:There are three types of interaction:active, passive and secondary
  • 30. Eric’s 4th Law of UX:UX design represents the consciousact of coordinating interactions,acknowledging interactions, andreducing negative interactions.
  • 31. Three types of interaction: Active (things we control) Passive (things we don’t control) Secondary (things that have indirect influence)
  • 32. Three types of interaction: Those we can control Those over which we have no control Those that affect the experience indirectly
  • 33. Active interaction Photo courtesy of: musthavemenus.com
  • 34. Active interactionCopyright could not be traced. Used for educational purposes only.
  • 35. Passive interaction (partly)Photo courtesy of: johnmariani.com
  • 36. Passive interactionPhoto by Massimiliano Uccelletti, photonet.com
  • 37. Secondary interactionPhoto courtesy of: koit.radiotown.com
  • 38. Secondary interactionPhoto courtesy of: tomatolover.com
  • 39. UX design combines all three activites Coordinating interactions that we can control Acknowledging interactions beyond our control Reducing negative interactions
  • 40. Coordinating interactions Photos courtesy of: Brooklyn Public Library, shipwrightsarms.com.au
  • 41. Coordinating interactions Photo courtesy of: capetownwineblog.com
  • 42. Coordinating interactions Photo courtesy of: Rootology under Wikipedia Commons License
  • 43. Acknowledging interactions Photo courtesy of: TinyFarmBlog.com
  • 44. Reducing negative interactionsPhoto courtesty of: kenlevine.blogspot.com
  • 45. Reducing negative interactionsPhoto courtesy of: marchedimanche.typepad.com
  • 46. Reducing negative interactionsPhoto courtesy of Andrew Sullivan
  • 47. Enhancing experience through context
  • 48. Demographics Define groups Segment according to needs
  • 49. Demographic profilesCartoon copyrights could not be traced. Used for educational purposes only.
  • 50. Segmenting by need
  • 51. What we should be doing
  • 52. Our self-created problem –we cannot be all things to all visitors
  • 53. An introduction to personalization
  • 54. Personalization Anticipating needs Eliminating the irrelevant NOT the same as customization Customization is what YOU do to a site Personalization is what the SITE does for you
  • 55. Cus tom izati on
  • 56. Cus tom izati on
  • 57. Cus tom izati on
  • 58. Pers o naliz a tion
  • 59. Pers o naliz a tion
  • 60. No clicks – everything is in play
  • 61. 1st click – is there a preference?
  • 62. 2nd click – this could be a pattern
  • 63. Third click – yes, there’s a pattern
  • 64. Fourth click – time to zero in
  • 65. Fourth click – time for context
  • 66. And what comes next… Big Mac Large shake ??? FriesPhoto copyright: McDonalds Corporation, Inc.Restricted use for educational purposes only.
  • 67. So in summary… Personal dialogue Contextual relevance Added value Provides better service Keeps customers happy Helps you make money
  • 68. Our new contex-is-the-kingdom mantra:“Do you want fries with that?”
  • 69. Eric Reiss can (usually) be found at:The FatDUX Group ApSStrandøre 152100 CopenhagenDenmarkOffice: (+45) 39 29 67 77Mobil: (+45) 20 12 88 44Twitter: @elreissinfo@fatdux.comwww.fatdux.com