Lab 6 - Angiosperms
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
3,383
On Slideshare
3,381
From Embeds
2
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
72
Comments
0
Likes
2

Embeds 2

http://www.slideshare.net 2

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 400mya
    Angiosperms and plant anatomy
    Million years of evolution:
    Cooksonia
    Practical # 3
    Mid-term evaluations (lab 6 of 10)
    Lecture
    Scavenger Hunt
    Turn in cladistics worksheet p 123-4
    Next week:
    Last lab practical
    Angiosperm
  • 2. http://www.johnkyrk.com/evolution.html
  • 3. Paleo plant and insect interactions
  • 4. Insects and plants evolved together
    Older
    Younger
  • 5. time
    Rapid origin
  • 6.
  • 7. The unique character of angiosperms is that the ovules are completely enclosed in a carpel
    1. gametophytes only a few cells
    2. immotile sperm- carried to ovule by pollen tube
    3. No “spores” because reduced gametophyte
  • 8. Extinct
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/flower/anat-flash.html
    Controversy about its floral morphology interpretation
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/flower/
  • 9. Knowing the flower anatomy…let’s review the fossil record of earliest angiosperms
    keep in mind:
    • To date, the origin of the angiosperms remains controversial
    • 10. No consensus about the ancestral relative
    • 11. Molecular evidence suggest a Jurassic origin (>150 Ma), but the oldest fossils is early Cretaceous (~125 Ma)
    MORE INFO: http://www.mobot.org/mobot/research/apweb/welcome.html
  • 12. UF grad student found this one!
  • 13. Extinct
  • 14. Many early flowers are
    related to living
    Angiosperms families
  • 15. Pollination of ‘primitive’ flowers
  • 16. Flowers adapted for pollination by "smart" insects
  • 17. Insects can see uv light
  • 18. Insects can see uv light
  • 19. What pollinates these?
  • 20.
  • 21.
  • 22.
  • 23.
  • 24. Wind-pollinated flowerssecondarily derived in Angiosperms
    -- flowers are green, small, and often lack petals.
    Wind pollinated flowers of deciduous trees species open in early spring – why?
  • 25. Pick the Pollinator
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/flower/pollinator.html
  • 26. Plant parts
    Take a look…
  • 27. Primitive vs Derived characters
    http://botany.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/tfplab/primder.htm
  • 28. Fruit and seed dispersal
  • 29.
  • 30. Don’t forget…
    Also: ichthyochory
  • 31. ?
  • 32. What disperses these?
  • 33. Pleistocene extinction
    Gomphothere
    Late Pleistocene Extinctions – 13,000 years ago, N & S America
  • 34. “Re-wilding of N. America?”
  • 35. Angiosperms often used for medicine – why?
    Preparing ayahuasca
  • 36. 3 clades
    A. Monocotyledones (monocots)
    B. Magnoliids
    C. Eudicotyledones (dicots)
  • 37. ANGIOSPERMS
  • 38. Generalized distinguishing characteristics:
  • 39. A comparison of monocots and dicots -- know this for lab practical
    Lab exercise – can you tell them apart?
  • 40.
  • 41. MONOCOTS
    All flesh is grass” -- Isaiah
    Grasses evolved directly with mammals
  • 42. Bamboo
  • 43. Banana
    Pineapple
    Onion
  • 44. Palms!
    ‘ivory palm’
    Coconuts
    Harvesting palm hearts
  • 45. Bactris gasipaes‘peach palm’
  • 46. One apical bud!!
  • 47. phloem
    xylem
    Monocot stem -- vascular bundles
  • 48. Dicot stem
    Xylem and phloem in rings
    Dicots have secondary growth
  • 49. Which tree has a better chance to live?
    Dicot
    Monocot (palm)
  • 50. Dicot stems
    Illegal mahagony logging
    Annual growth rings?
  • 51. We eat many, many dicot fruits
    Examples?
    Theobroma cacao
  • 52.
  • 53. In common?
    Kale
    Califlower
    Kohlrabi
    Chinese kale
    cabbage
    Broccoli
    Collard greens
    Brussel sprouts
  • 54. Brassica oleracea
    Kale
    Califlower
    Kohlrabi
    Chinese kale
    cabbage
    Broccoli
    Collard greens
    Brussel sprouts
    ‘wild mustard’
  • 55. Brassica oleracea
    ‘wild mustard’
  • 56. Vavilov Centersof origin for crop plants
    http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/history/lecture05/lec05.html
  • 57.
  • 58. Anatomy study slides
  • 59. The life cycle of an angiosperm
  • 60. Angiosperm life cycle
  • 61. Plant morphology/anatomy
    Primary vs. secondary growth
    A. Apical meristems - primary growth
    B. Cambium (vascular or cork) - secondary growth
    C. In lab -. Apical meristems
    1. Coleus - stem tip (no. 3) - herbaceous dicot
    2. Zea - root longitudinal section (no. 4) - monocot
  • 62. Seed anatomy Scan
  • 63. Stems
    A. Anatomy
    1. parenchyma (pith) 6. xylem
    2. sclerenchyma 7. phloem
    3. epidermis 8. vascular cambium
    4. cork & cork cambium 9. meristem
    5. cortex 10. node
    B. In lab:
    1. Helianthus - stem (no. 5) - herbaceous dicot
    2. Tilia - stem cross sections (no. 6) - woody dicot
    3. Zea - stem cross section (no. 7)
  • 64. Morphology of a flowering plant
  • 65. Morphology of a winter twig
  • 66. Anatomy of a tree trunk
  • 67. Organization of primary tissues in young stems
  • 68. Leaves
    A. Anatomy
    1. palisade mesophyll 5. stomata
    2. spongy mesophyll 6. xylem
    3. epidermis 7. phloem
    4. cuticle
    B. In lab:
    1. Ligustrum - leaf section (no. 8)
  • 69. Leaf anatomy
  • 70. Simple versus compound leaves
    a. Simple
    b. Compound
    i. palmate
    ii. pinnate
  • 71. Roots
    A. Anatomy
    1. epidermis 5. casparian strip
    2. cortex 6. pericycle
    3. stele 7. xylem
    4. endodermis 8. phloem
    B. In lab:
    1. Ranunculus - root (no. 9)
    2. Salix - branch root (no. 10)
    3. radish root hairs
    4. sweet potato demo - storage root
    5. carrot - root stores sugars
  • 72. Primary growth of a root
  • 73. Organization of primary tissues in young roots
  • 74.
  • 75. The formation of lateral roots
  • 76. Root hairs of a radish seedling
  • 77. Storage organs
    A. white potato demo - modified stem
    B. green onion demo - leaves modified for storage
    C. celery - leaf petiole modified
    D. sweet potato demo - storage root
    E. carrot - root stores sugars
  • 78. Principal Biological Concepts this lab:
    A. Angiosperms as dominant plant taxon.
    B. Ovules enclosed within two integuments and a carpel wall.
    C. Structure and function of flowers, and importance of pollinators.
    D. Carpel wall may ripen as pericarp = fruit.
    E. Monocots versus dicots
    F. Double fertilization.
    G. Plant tissues.
    H. Primary and secondary growth.
    I. Structure and function of shoots, roots, and leaves.
  • 79. To study for next lab practical
    Moncots vs dicots
    Flower parts
    Leaf structures
    Stem structures, xylem vs phloem, monocots vs dicot vasculature
    Root tissues & functions
    Xylem vs phloem
  • 80. Complete Plant Cladistic Exercise
    A. Follow directions in Plant Cladistics data sheet (pp. 123-124).
    B. Complete the cladogram and hand in before you leave.