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Lessons from chile
 

Lessons from chile

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Leaders and companies can learn a lot from Operation Chile Mine Rescue.

Leaders and companies can learn a lot from Operation Chile Mine Rescue.

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    Lessons from chile Lessons from chile Presentation Transcript

    • What companies can learn from Chile miners rescue Staff Motivation 3.0 Erica Liang Change Management Consultant Oct 14, 2010 Photo credits: Reuters, AP, BBC
    • Each miner is assigned a clear task, clearing debris, documenting life underground, however mundane. Everyone is accountable for one thing. Setting goals and purpose for each individual is in fact motivating. Asking everyone to do one thing means it “Ain’t my problem”.
    • Miners’ health and good spirits in no small part helped by strict regime and diet. Some even in better shape than before. Encourage discipline. Incentivise appropriately. Communicate benefits. Regularly.
    • President Pinera holding up first note from the 33 miners trapped 630m underground Celebrate every milestone. Break a large goal into little ones. Publicly announce after every small step is reached.
    • Under promise, over deliver. Oh and always offer options. Customer and staff satisfaction guaranteed. While three drills aptly named Plan A, B and C were competing round the clock to reach the cave first, even after Plan B got through, officials managed expectations of rescue timings carefully.
    • This gentleman turned up voluntarily to bring joy at Camp Hope when he saw the miners’ kids waiting for their dads there. His action prompted authorities to set up temporary school on site. Encourage initiative. Have as diverse a team you can afford. Listen to their needs. Give them the resources and tools to do more.
    • Four test runs satisfied engineers, doctors and support team before sending for the first miner. No details spared. The winch + Fenix 2 proved to be an effective, simple elevation system. Going in unprepared is recipe for failure. User trials and rehearsals are time well spent. Better yet, keep it simple.
    • Relatives and friends share media tent. Comaraderie and single focal point leads to intense focus awaiting each miner popping out from capsule. Stay focussed on tangible results. Leaders, create community by providing communal resource. Then stay out of it.
    • Protocol, SOP, checklist, rules, best practice. If you’ve got it, execute it. No exceptions. Or everyone will try to be the exception. BBC: Does every miner really need a stretcher? Most seem so energetic after emerging. Chile Special Forces Medic: We had a protocol. We stuck to it.
    • Every single miner given their moment of freedom to shine in front of their dearest and the world. Leaders take every chance to publicly show gratitude to each contributor. Or allow each staff to shine. Mediocrity takes a back seat if thrust into limelight.