Interior Design Portfolio.

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A taste of work.

A taste of work.

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  • 1. [portfolio] Erica Elizabeth Brown │ 647.884.8463 This portfolio is an amalgamation of proj- ects completed during four years com- pleted at Humber College in the Bachelor of Applied Arts: Interior Design Degree program from 2006-2010.
  • 2. [contents] E d u c a t i o n Science + Technology Secondary School April 2010 Individual Project - Thesis E d u c a t i o n Post Secondary Learning Commons Facility December 2009 Partner Project - IDEC Charette H o s p i t a l i t y Inniskillin Winery Addition +Renovation December 2008 Team Project R e t a i l Metropolitan Vitality Home Furnishings April 2008 Individual Project H e a l t h C a r e Mobile Pediatric Clinic December 2007 Partner Project D e t a i l s Working Drawings Wall Details Specifications
  • 3. [education] PROJECT CLIENT Toronto District School Board PROJECT COMPLETED April 2010 “The nature of education Located amid the revitalized area of St. Lawrence in downtown Toronto, the Berkeley Castle offers an ideal context for a project that today has become more breaks out of a dichotomous way of learning and becomes a benchmark for alternative ways of learning. By establishing a tension against the frame of the original structure, the design will feature versatile and visible strategies in order to sustain the demands and interactive and experiential. changes of technology. Influenced by sustainable initiatives the facility will encompass an externality of relations in order to promote Students now have the discovery and connections between multiple environments. opportunity to learn in multiple ways, and the spaces where they can learn should be equally varied. School facilities should reflect the latest thinking in education” (American Architectural Foundation). Space Within Future Innovators Contingent Natural a Space of Society Environment
  • 4. [education] PROJECT CLIENT Toronto District School Board PROJECT COMPLETED April 2010 While preserving the existing architectural context of the building and the surrounding area, the design will feature versatile strate- gies in order to sustain the demand and changes of technology. By not only incorporating sustainable features in the building typol- ogy itself, but exposing students to the processes and elements used to sustain our earth, the facility will become a benchmark in producing schools that truly have meaning and significance to the students, faculty and community. The Berkeley Academy of Science & Technology will be more than an educational facility and aims to connect students with multiple environments while focus- ing on meaningful is-sues and emerging environmental technologies. Northern Longitudinal Building Section
  • 5. Third Level [education] PROJECT CLIENT Toronto District School Board PROJECT COMPLETED April 2010 CONCEPT The Berkeley Academy for Science & Technology (BAST) will provide students with a standard core curriculum for secondary edu- INTERLACING cation complying will all Ministry of Ontario regulations while integrating an alternative way of learning for students’ grades nine to twelve. The choices of enriched programs will focus on innovative and demanding careers in science and technology in order to ENVIRONMENTS sustain the future generations in technological advances. The Berkeley Academy for Science & Technology with generous reinforce- ment from the Toronto District School Board will exceed the standards of a typical secondary school and generate a comprehensive Building an externality of relations approach where students gain a stronger foundation of key academic concepts in Science and Technology through applied hands in order to promote discovery and on learning. By minimizing operating costs and truly creating a space the students are happy and healthy learning in, the facility will connections between multiple become a benchmark in producing schools that truly have meaning and significance to the students, faculty and community. environments. Western Latitudinal Building Section
  • 6. [education] PROJECT CLIENT Toronto District School Board PROJECT COMPLETED April 2010 Sustainable initiatives within Berkeley Academy of Science & Technology are light shelves which will direct the outdoor light further into the rooms and corridors, daylight photo sensors on lights between 15’ as well as automatic sensor shades, occupancy motion sensors on classrooms and breakout rooms and where appropriate, LED fixtures will be used. A learning green roof will be imple- mented on the roof of the building. This will also house a small solar panel grid which is operable and also educational. These key elements along with future developments as the building becomes older and more sensible will promote sustainable living and learn- ing and create a healthy environment while implementing practical needs to the students. Southern Longitudinal Building Section
  • 7. REIMPOSING LEARNING A new approach to the evolution of learning styles supporting the shift from teaching to learning. [education] In today’s schools the availability of resources, group study spaces and information technology is lacking. The innovation of Also, printing and technical help is another important area of learning commons and should be located in close proximity to the current learning commons typology is a new approach to this problem. Learning commons are physical learning spaces the computer area and should minimize noise pollution. Furthermore, in an effort to promote a healthy lifestyle for college and for higher education students that provide “a dynamic collaborative environment on campus, often in a library that provides university students, a healthy quick stop café should be incorporated. All learning commons should incorporate informal assistance to students with information and research needs”. The main purpose for developing a strong learning common lounge area creating a humanizing, natural element to the learning commons. This area should display simplistic design area is to enhance student learning and provide an easy transition from teaching to learning strategies. These learning com- layouts and should have a strong connection to the café. This is the place where the students and/or faculty can meet, catch PROJECT CLIENT mons can be utilized by undergraduate and graduate students as well as faculty which will increase the feeling of ownership up on current evens or simply lounge between classes. within the school. More specifically, learning commons should be readily available, in a central location focusing on the end University X users of the space. In an innovative and sustainable approach, learning commons will display the diversity of people and learning and forecast PROJECT COMPLETED the future of college and university interactive communities. Sustainability is a simple and effective implementation that will The main challenge when designing a learning commons space is catering to each individual and their learning styles while minimize maintenance and operating costs while creating a healthy work environment for all students and faculty. It is evident, December 2010 creating a “supportive learning environment”. To be successful, this space should “illustrate human centered design” by that “educators have long recognized that these communities significantly heighten learning experiences and that they mirror combining multifunctional collaborative spaces and static individual workstations. The multifunctional collaborative spaces will the working environment that students will enter on completion of their studies”. accommodate groups of students from two to eight people. Both public and private spaces will be developed to further cater to different applications. These spaces will provide instantaneous media sharing methods and a complete 360 degree visibility Http://www.library.yorku.ca/ccm/Home/preview/infolit/commons/learning-commons.en Http://www.library.yorku.ca/ccm/Home/preview/infolit/commons/learning-commons.en of the group’s work by integrating new products such as Steelcase’s MediaScape collaboration line. The individual worksta- Http://www.library.queensu.ca/learningcommons/.../learning_commons_design_brief2.pdf tions must be separated from the main circulation of the space to provide privacy and a quiet study environment. Individual Http://www.educausc.edu/learningspaceisch9 Learning commons are study areas could benefit from small clusters throughout the space rather than one large confined area. Not all students have http://www.steelcase.com/na/files/Flash/na/ComeTogether/index.htm access to a laptop, in order to provide students with computers and necessary software it is important to incorporate desig- Http://www.library.queensu.ca/learningcommons/.../learning_commons_design_brief2.pdf physical learning spaces nated computer workstations for both short and long term use. Http://www.library.queensu.ca/learningcommons/.../learning_commons_design_brief2.pdf for higher education stu- dents that provide “a CONCEPT dynamic collaborative envi- ronment on campus, often ENVIRO-LEARNING COMMONS in a library that provides 2009/2010 IDEC STUDENT DESIGN COMPETITION assistance to students with information and research needs”. (York University) I. Incorporate a true ‘community’ atmosphere by encouraging student/faculty relation within the learning commons
  • 8. 1 ENTRY 6 6 6 6 2 CAFÉ 7 3 LOUNGE AREA 9 4 INDIVIDUAL BAR HEIGHT AREA 5 OPEN GROUP AREA 5 8 6 CLOSED GROUP ROOMS 7 COMPUTER AREA 4 8 PRINTING STATION 2 9 QUICK USE COMPUTERS 1 3 9 4 8 5 [education] 3 3 FLOOR PLAN II. Humanizing the space by encompassing daily routines of the students and faculty SCALE 0’- 1/8” = 1’-0” III. Support functional flexibility in the design that minimizes maintenance and operating costs and has a positive contribution to the environment PROJECT CLIENT PERSPECTIVE LEARNING BEYOND University X PROJECT COMPLETED ARMSTRONG BAMBOO FLOOR FROSTED GLASS PARTITIONS INTERFACE FLOR CARPET TILES BACK PAINTED GLASS December 2010 TILE BACKSPLASH LIGHT SHELVES BAMBOO FLOORING NO VOC PAINT OWNERSHIP MAHARAM HIGH PERFORMANCE UPHOLSTERY WATER NO GREENHOUSE DENATURED In an innovative and sus- GAS EMISSIONS ETHANOL FIREPLACE HUMANIZING FUNCTIONAL FLEXIBILITY REDUCED ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT BASED HIGH GLOSS MOVEABLE WALLS tainable approach, learning commons will display the diversity of people and SUSTAINABILITY SHIFT FROM TEACHING TO LEARNING MATERIALS learning and forecast the FLOOR PLAN ENVIRO-LEARNING COMMONS future of college and uni- versity interactive commu- nities. 2009/2010 IDEC STUDENT DESIGN COMPETITION II. Humanizing the space by encompassing daily routines of the students and faculty III. Support functional flexibility in the design that minimizes maintenance and operating costs and has a positive contribution to the environment
  • 9. 1 COMPUTER AREA 2 OPEN GROUP AREA 1 2 3 4 5 3 CAFÉ 4 ENTRY / FIREPLACE LOUNGE 5 LOUNGE AREA 6 PRINTING STATION EAST WALL SECTIONAL ELEVATION 7 CLOSED GROUP ROOMS SCALE 0’- 1/8” = 1’-0” IV. Provide a benchmark for the entire campus to encourage learning beyond the classroom 6 7 3 2 [education] SOUTH WALL SECTIONAL ELEVATION SCALE 0’- 1/8” = 1’-0” V. Increase ownership of diverse technological devices that enriches learning PROJECT CLIENT University X PROJECT COMPLETED 1 2 3 4 December 2010 In en effort to promote a healthy 5 6 7 lifestyle for college and university SECTIONAL ELEVATIONS ENVIRO-LEARNING COMMONS students, a healthy quick stop café will be incor- porated. 2009/2010 IDEC STUDENT DESIGN COMPETITION IV. Provide a benchmark for the entire campus to encourage learning beyond the classroom V. Increase ownership of diverse technological devices that enriches learning
  • 10. [hospitality] PROJECT CLIENT Inniskillin Winery PROJECT COMPLETED November 2008 The process of photo- synthesis involving the phases of catch, change and release according to the human eye.
  • 11. [hospitality] PROJECT CLIENT Inniskillin Winery PROJECT COMPLETED November 2008 The CATCH of the sunlight is virtually unseen and captures the attention or interest of the viewer.
  • 12. [hospitality] PROJECT CLIENT Inniskillin Winery PROJECT COMPLETED November 2008 The CHANGE is visibly intangible to the human eye but the knowledge that it occurs exists.
  • 13. [hospitality] PROJECT CLIENT Inniskillin Winery PROJECT COMPLETED November 2008 The RELEASE is the Inspiration for the visible, tangible aspects materials and that are exposed to the finishes are drawn outside and where the from the vineyards result is depicted and and elements within observable. the reactions in wine making. A contem- porary, yet timeless color palate merges dynamic and inti- mate spaces.
  • 14. 13513 11836 4214 617 2434 1064 609 2997 632 1638 608 305 2438 508 NEW YORK CITY STYLE VERTICLE DECORATIVE METAL STAIRCASE 152 610 610 330 330 STORAGE 102 OVER COUNTER OFFICE SHELVING 106 2653 WINDOW DISPLAY P1 DISPLAYS FAX CUBBY UNIT 104 PRINTER 2743 WRAP DISPLAYS SURFACE 3048 103 P4 CASH/WRAP PULL DOWN MICROWAVE GARBAGE BIN SERVICE AREA 610 UNDER COUNTER 105 OVER COUNTER SHELVING 1462 OVERHEAD 107 610 DISPLAYS PULL DOWN P3 UNDER COUNTER 254 305 DEBIT RECYCLE BIN FRIDGE 8534 UNDER COUNTER REGISTER 305 PILLAR ARCH PILLAR PILLAR ARCH PILLAR ARCH PILLAR ARCH PILLAR PHONE PILLAR ENTRY BLOCK ONLY P4 101 DIVIDING DINING ROOM P5 SCREEN DISPLAY LIVING ROOM SHELVING [retail] FREE-STANDING 110 UNIT COAT RACK OUTDOOR DISPLAY BENCH COFFEE TABLE WITH 4267 STORAGE BELOW 111 STORAGE P2 ROOM 108 SHELVING TV CABINET SERVING UNIT CABINET SHELVING UNIT P5 BATHROOM 109 FURNITURE AND PARTITION PLAN LEVEL1 3200 1587 1587 610 1981 1219 610 P1 2591 1067 DESIGN AREA P1 51 202 RUG DISPLAY 610 OPEN TO P2 BELOW 1676 FABRIC LIBRARY PROJECT CLIENT 201 P2 Metropolitan Vitality PROJECT COMPLETED BEDROOM DRESSER DISPLAY April 2008 203 BENCH P2 4267 P4 P5 OPEN TO BELOW P2 OPEN TO P2 BELOW P5 FURNITURE AND PARTITION PLAN LEVEL 2
  • 15. STORAGE 102 OFFICE DISPLAYS 106 104 CH 2743.2 DISPLAYS CH 6400.8 CASH/WRAP 103 105 SUSPENDED RECESSED UNDER SERVICE AREA UNDER DISPLAY UNIT COUNTER 107 MULTI LEVEL RECESSED WOODEN CH (UNDER UNDER BEAMS ENTRY COUNTER CANOPY WALKWAY) 2743.2 DINING ROOM CH 2743.2 101 DISPLAY LIVING ROOM 110 [retail] CH 3149.2 DISPLAY 111 STORAGE ROOM 108 CH 2946.2 CH 2743.2 CH 2743.2 BATHROOM 109 REFLECTED CEILING PLAN LEVEL1 CH 6400.8 DESIGN AREA 202 FABRIC LIBRARY PROJECT CLIENT 201 Metropolitan Vitality CH 2743.2 PROJECT COMPLETED CH 2743.2 BEDROOM CH (AT PEAK) DISPLAY April 2008 CH 6400.8 203 OPEN WEB STEEL WOODEN 4153 JOISTS BEAMS PEEKED & MIDORED AT A 45 DEGREE ANGLE SKYLIGHT SUSPENDED GYPSUM WALLBOARD BULKHEADS REFLECTED CEILING PLAN LEVEL 2
  • 16. SYLVANIA LED HF2 DISPLAY NICHES STICK IN DISPLAY LEATHER LOW STEEL JOISTS NICHES BENCH 612 ARMSTRONG WOODWORKS 299 PLANK CEILING SYSTEM 37 FROSTED GLASS 610 PARTIAL PARTITION BRUSHED NICKLE CASEMENTS ON MEZZANINE 610 PARTITION LOW RISE BED AND SIDE TABLE [retail] 6401 404 5733 305 LOGO ON A SHEET OF PLEXY GLASS MOUNTED ON WALL 1128 1956 1902 DECORATIVE MAIN LEVEL 3048 MIRROR 2796 $149.67 1867 1092 894 102 265 305 305 305 1207 887 610 113 1097 580 1524 2410 305 7315 305 7925 DISPLAY CASH/WRAP DINING DISPLAY AREA PROJECT CLIENT Metropolitan Vitality LATITUDE SECTION PROJECT COMPLETED SCALE 1:50 April 2008 5007
  • 17. 5007 2743 AREA OPEN TO BEDROOM DISPLAY BELOW SKYLIGHT 1372 588 305 1067 610 1016 610 BRUSHED NICKLE STEEL JOISTS CASEMENTS ON FROSTED GLASS 406 102 PARTITION PARTIAL PARTITION 66 620 AREA OPEN TO BELOW WOODEN PEEKED SUSPENDED MEZZANINE 2733 BULKHEAD 1930 DRYWALL SIDES TO THE SUSPENDED 6401 BULKHEAD 305 610 [retail] 660 1930 MAIN LEVEL 2743 2743 2083 305 673 305 955 955 951 826 1524 1524 1524 610 239 305 305 305 305 1524 305 203 51 305 3048 696 11227 305 1829 13665 STORAGE & BATHROOM DINING ROOM DISPLAY LIVING ROOM DISPLAY FRONT POURCH LATITUDE SECTION SCALE 1:50 PROJECT CLIENT Metropolitan Vitality PROJECT COMPLETED April 2008
  • 18. 2692 1315 SKYLIGHT INSIDE: WOODEN PEEKED DROP STORE LOGO BRUSHED NICKLE WOODEN PEEKED CEILING CONCRETE SPRAYED FROSTED CASEMENTS ON COVE CANOPY STORE LIMIT ONTO WINDOW WINDOWS CASEMENTS 371 2167 2438 7010 LOFTS AT QUEEN WEST 6401 [retail] DOLLAR 'N' MORE 1914 2743 2743 INSIDE: PILLARS INSIDE: STAIRCASE 3353 305 1333 305 1411 BRUSHED NICKLE CASEMENTS ON 914 6706 914 PARTITION 8534 FROSTED GLASS INSIDE: ROOM DIVIDER PARTIAL PARTITION STONE DOOR INSIDE: WINDOW FOUNDATION HIDDEN ON DISPLAY UNIT WITH LEVEL INSIDE WALL NICHES ADJACENT STORE WITH APARTMENTS ABOVE METROPOLITAN VITALITY NEW CONDO LOFTS STOREFRONT ELEVATION SCALE 1:50 PROJECT CLIENT Metropolitan Vitality PROJECT COMPLETED April 2008
  • 19. [health care] Pediatric Oncology Group Of Ontario has created a highly inte- grated and seamless pediatric cancer system that supports children and families throughout the spec- trum of illness, recov- ery and survivorship. PROJECT CLIENT Pediatric Oncology Group Of Ontario PROJECT COMPLETED December 2007 FURNITURE AND PARTITION PLAN TRAILER 1 - RECEPTION & EXAM ROOMS
  • 20. [health care] The materials and finishes are influenced by energy and happiness that each child reveals as they inter- act with the doctors, nurses and other patients at each visit. The bravery each child endures is impor- tant to recognize, thus the concept of the clinic WELCOMING RECOVERY POGO’s mission is to continually drive improvements across the continuum of children’s cancer care in Ontario by: 1.ensuring access to and avail- ability of the absolute best cancer care 2.providing essential support for children, survivors and families 3.conducting childhood cancer research 4.providing ongoing professional development opportunities PROJECT CLIENT Pediatric Oncology Group Of Ontario PROJECT COMPLETED December 2007 FURNITURE AND PARTITION PLAN TRAILER 2 - TREATMENT ROOMS
  • 21. 1 ID 5.0 SCALE 3” = 1’-0” STANDARD 14’ G.W.B PARTITION April 2010 Toronto District School Board PROJECT COMPLETED PROJECT CLIENT [details] 1 2 ID 5.0 SCALE 3” = 1’-0” ID 5.0 SCALE 3” = 1’-0” 14’ GLASS PARTITION STANDARD 14’ G.W.B PARTITION not scale drawings All work shall be in accordance with the latest edition of the Ontario Building Code. 2 PROJECT ISSUED DESCRIPTION DATE DRAWING design at humber BAAID 01 Check off 1 03.23.10 Berkeley Academy for 02 Check off 2 04.01.10 wall Sections 205 Humber College Blvd. 03 Check off 3 04.06.10 Toronto, ON Science & Technology 04 Final Submission 04.28.10 1 M9W 5L9 DESIGNER SCALE PAGE NO. Erica Elizabeth Brown AS PER DWG ID 5.0 ** Scales are not represented here as shown, title blocks are from drawing set. ID 5.0 SCALE 3” = 1’-0” 14’ GLASS PARTITION ID 5.1 SCALE 3” = 1’-0” Do not scale drawings All work shall be in accordance with the latest edition of the PROJECT ISSUED DESCRIPTION DATE DRAWING design at humber BAAID 01 Check off 1 03.23.10 Berkeley Academy for 02 Check off 2 04.01.10 wall Sections 205 Humber College Blvd. 03 Check off 3 04.06.10 Toronto, ON Science & Technology 04 Final Submission 04.28.10 14’ G.W.B PARTITION WITH GLASS INSERT M9W 5L9 DESIGNER SCALE Erica Elizabeth Brown AS PER DWG
  • 22. [details] 1 ATRIUM RAILING ELEVATION ID 6.6 SCALE 1” = 1’-0” 2 ATRIUM RAILING CONNECTION BRACKET 3 ATRIUM RAILING ELEVATION ID 6.6 SCALE 3” = 1’-0” ID 6.6 SCALE 1” = 1’-0” PROJECT CLIENT Toronto District School Board PROJECT COMPLETED April 2010 ** Scales are not represented here as shown, title blocks are from drawing set.
  • 23. 1 CUSTOM RESEARCH CENTRE SOUTH ELEVATION ID 6.1 SCALE 1/2” = 1’-0” [details] 2 CUSTOM RESEARCH CENTRE WEST SECTION ID 6.1 SCALE 1” = 1’-0” PROJECT CLIENT Toronto District School Board PROJECT COMPLETED April 2010 ** Scales are not represented here as shown, title blocks are from drawing set.
  • 24. All work shall be in accordance with the latest edition of the Ontario Building Code. [details] Do not scale drawings KEY PLAN SCALE 1/64” = 1’-0” Furniture & MIllwork Plan Second Level Focal Area PROJECT CLIENT Toronto District School Board PROJECT COMPLETED April 2010 ** Scales are not represented here as shown, title blocks are from drawing set.