4.4 gender roles and differences

4,010 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Health & Medicine
1 Comment
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Hi... Can i have a copy of this presentation, this is very helpful for us...Kindly send to ovcaa.msugsc@gmail.com, if its ok with you. thank you very much!
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,010
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
893
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
176
Comments
1
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

4.4 gender roles and differences

  1. 1. Chapter 4.4 – Gender Roles and Differences By: Zach, Julia, Phu
  2. 2. Gender Roles  Gender Identity – Physical/biological make up (Biernat & Wortman, 1991)  Gender Stereotype – when a gender role’s expectations become so rigid, it becomes expectation of a gender from everyone  Androgynous – combination of traditional male/female characteristics  Gender Schema – set of behaviors organized around how either male/female should think & behave
  3. 3. Gender Roles (cont.)  Gender Role – what the society/culture expect of your gender
  4. 4. Gender Differences - Personality  Mednick & Thomas (1993) – found males are more confident than females, especially in academic areas or in tasks stereotyped as masculine (e.g. math, science)
  5. 5. Personality (cont.)  Turner & Gervai (1995) – females engage in more verbal acts of aggression  Kendrick (1987) – Females think differently about aggression.  (Bjorkqvist, Lagerspetz, Kukianen) different in aggressive behavior – More likely to use rough play / female indirect form of aggression.
  6. 6. Personality (cont.)  (Berman, Tracy, and Caccaro) – Male have lower levels of serotonin (aggression)  (Lakoff, McMillan) – Communication: Females talk more/ Males talk more if dominant in relationship.  (Briton and Hall) – Females are more sensitive
  7. 7. Cognitive Ability  Common misconception of females being better than males at verbal skills, males better at spatial and mathematical skills disproven by Janet Hyde and Marcia Linn (1998).
  8. 8. Origins of Gender Differences  Biological Theory – emphasizes role of anatomy, hormones, and brain organization (Archer, 1997)  Psychoanalytical Theory – gender identity results from children identifying with parent of same sex, according to Freud. Critics argue that identification is the result, rather than the cause, of gender typing (Maccoby, 1992)
  9. 9. Origins of Gender Differences (cont.)  Social Learning Theory – emphasizes role of social/cognitive process on how we perceive, organize, & use info.  Cognitive-Development Theory – proposes that children acquire gender roles by interacting with their environment & thinking about these experiences (Bem, 1981)
  10. 10. Origins of Gender Differences (cont.)  Gender Schema – mental representation of behavior that helps child organize/categorize behaviors  Changing Gender Roles – people have been taught by society to set different goals.

×