10 Steps to High-Yield College Recruiting
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10 Steps to High-Yield College Recruiting

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Presentation from the ERE Expo 2010 Fall in Florida, presented by Kevin Wheeler

Presentation from the ERE Expo 2010 Fall in Florida, presented by Kevin Wheeler

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10 Steps to High-Yield College Recruiting Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Kevin Wheeler  ERE EXPO 2010  Hollywood, Florida  ERE EXPO 2010 
  • 2. •  Tell me about trends or issues you see on campus or with new hires. •  What recruiting issues do you have? 2
  • 3. •  "Focus, focus, focus" drives us to pay  a;en=on to those few things, those  cri=cal ini=a=ves, that determine  relevance, viability, and success in the  future.”   SOURCE: Seeing Things Whole by Frances Hesselbein, Leader to Leader, No. 37 Summer 2005. The Future:   ‐Smaller number of college              students.   ‐Increased demand for skilled              and educated workers.   ‐Global business opera=ons              requiring a diverse workforce.   ‐Different aPtudes about     Work. 
  • 4. •  Students have many opportunities – in many organizations and in many countries. •  Their attitudes about work are changing and their focus is on doing meaningful work. •  They are attracted to organizations that offer challenges in a fun environment. ERE EXPO 2010  4 
  • 5. Confident & optimistic Fewer want to work for you. Civic-Minded Global Mindset Right-sizing their lives ERE EXPO 2010  5 
  • 6. –  making an impact •  Will I be able to work on projects and contribute in a meaningful way to the organization’s profits? –  having responsibility for outcomes •  Will I get recognition or a bonus if I do this job (well) (quickly)? –  receiving meaningful & ‘fair’ rewards •  Will I get visibility and credit for the work I have done? –  working as part of a team •  Will I be working with others or mostly alone? –  growing & learning – not having a career •  What kinds of training and development are available from day one? •  Who will mentor me? •  How can I move to another job? ERE EXPO 2010  6 
  • 7. •  Millennial Magnets share five basic best practices: –  Personal-Touch recruiting. –  Many of the companies take an extremely active and personal role in the recruitment of young employees. FactSet, a software company based in Connecticut, sends new hires who are college seniors a gift basket and “good-luck” note before they take their finals. –  Work-Life balance. –  These companies offer employees flexible schedules . . . –  Group socializing. –  Millennial Magnets understand that this generation enjoys working and socializing in groups. –  Recognition. –  The chosen companies know how to motivate Millennials through positive feedback. –  Casual but professional environment. –  Many Millennial Magnet companies are crafting a “Google-style” corporate environment that is friendly, comfortable, and cutting edge. h;p://smartblogs.com/workforce/2010/10/25/five‐best‐prac=ces‐for‐managing‐millennials/  ERE EXPO 2010  7 
  • 8. •  A Career (at least not a traditional one) •  Permanent employment •  Status and power •  Security and stability ERE EXPO 2010  8 
  • 9. ERE EXPO 2010  9 
  • 10. •  Built on non-quantitative criteria and on assumptions: –  Certain schools are better than others because of reputation, alumni and manager opinion. –  Alumni reflect what you want today. –  Going to campus is critical. –  Most students want to work for your organization. ERE EXPO 2010  10 
  • 11. Most programs are B–O–R–I–N–G and INEFFECTIVE for Gen Y ERE EXPO 2010  11 
  • 12. ERE EXPO 2010  12 
  • 13. •  Pick an organization from among you & discuss these: –  Who are you focused on getting – skills, background, interests? Why? –  How do you define success? –  What competencies or traits do they have in common? –  What turned them on to your organization?
  • 14. •  Define success •  Identify “core” desired hire •  Focus all messaging around what attracts and excites them. ERE EXPO 2010  14 
  • 15. •  Spend 2 minutes and write a sentence or two that clearly answers this student question: –  “Why my organization? Why should I consider a position here instead of at competitor #1 or #2?” •  Share your answer with a partner and get their response. 15
  • 16. ERE EXPO 2010  16 
  • 17. •  Social media & mobile are king in appeal, reach and effectiveness. ERE EXPO 2010  17 
  • 18. ERE EXPO 2010  18 
  • 19. ERE EXPO 2010  19 
  • 20. ERE EXPO 2010  20 
  • 21. •  Reach out to both active and passive students in any school. –  Spread a wider and longer net – aggressive marketing and carefully designed web sites. •  Use technology to create interest, excitement and relationships. –  Establish and build personal relationships early in their school life. •  Interview and screen using technology. –  Define jobs by competencies and expected performance. –  Use online screening. •  Make the process personal. –  Screened candidates get special treatment. –  Touch candidates in ways meaningful to them. ERE EXPO 2010  21 
  • 22. ERE EXPO 2010  22 
  • 23. ERE EXPO 2010  23 
  • 24. Recognition Progress Reward ERE EXPO 2010  24 
  • 25. •  So you don’t have to go there, use. . . –  Campus ‘talent scouts’ –  Employees who are taking classes –  Employees who volunteer/teach/tutor –  Professors –  Students –  University relations/research experts
  • 26. Active • Chat rooms • Info Sessions • Email • Videos • Web site • Interviews • Personalized content • Tours • On-line discussions Candidate Type • Face-to-face • Social Networks • Contests • Friend’s referral • Blog • Placement office • Surveys • Info sessions • Campus scouts • Printed material • Focus groups Passive • Web site for other reason Traditional Innovative Recruiting Mindset
  • 27. •  Chat in small groups and share what you think are innovative, different, exciting ideas for college recruiting. •  Share with us all. ERE EXPO 2010  27 
  • 28. •  Focus information and be precise. Candidates consistently say they dislike vagueness, lack of specific examples. •  Observe what they see and what influences them: Know their filters: –  Lifestyle, fairness, opportunity
  • 29. •  Remove all fluff, bureaucratic talking heads and focus presentations on realistic, candid facts. •  Go to where the students are – on-line, gaming, YouTube, Facebook.
  • 30. •  Offer a one year satisfaction guarantee or they get help finding another job. •  Develop a flexible internal transfer process if a new college hire is unhappy – guarantee them a good manager!
  • 31. The Traditional recruit from a limited number of campuses –  Hold information sessions on campus several times each year. –  Interview most students on campus. –  Focus is on an active student -ones that sought them out. –  Rely a great deal on career services at the university. ERE EXPO 2010  31 
  • 32. Recruit from an array of campuses using. . . •  Social media •  Powerful websites that attract, screen and sell. •  Leverage Facebook, Twitter & other virtual tools. •  Apply CRM and build communities. –  Provide information all the time – virtually. –  Screen and interview using technology. –  Find and encourage the passive student. ERE EXPO 2010  32 
  • 33. Kevin Wheeler  Kwheeler@glresources.com  www.glresources.com