J. Donald Capra

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  • J. Donald Capra

    1. 1. The IDeA Program• Centers of Biomedical Excellence (COBRE)• IDeA Clinical and Translational Research (IDeA CTR)• IDeA Networks of Biomedical Research Excellence (INBRE)• IDeA Community-Based Research • Selected Examples• IDeA Co-funding• IDeA Net • Selected Examples• National Association of IDeA Principal Investigators (NAIPI)• Selected Science Advances
    2. 2. INBRE: 24 statewide networks COBRE: 84 thematic research centers VT ME MT ND NH ID SD WY RI NE NV DE WV KS KY OK AR SC NM MS LAAK HI PR
    3. 3. $1,800 $1,631 $1,550 $1,580 $1,546 $1,600 $1,523 $1,558 $1,585 $1,552 $1,400 $1,458 $1,305 $1,200MILLION $1,000 $1,064 $885 $800 $596 $700 $600 $461 $462 $555 $400 $424 $463 $214 $222 $220 $218 $224 $224 $229 $229 $210 $200 $160 $100 $40 $1 $1 $1 $2 $2 $5 $10 $0 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 FISCAL YEAR IDeA Program Appropriations Total NIH Funding to IDeA states
    4. 4. Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) Background • COBRE center grant program launched in fiscal year 2000 • To expand and develop biomedical faculty research capability • To enhance research infrastructure including core facilities • To build multidisciplinary research centers with a thematic scientific focus at doctoral institutions or research institutes Center Characteristics • Led by an established investigator, funded by NIH, NSF or other comparable Federal or private sector source • At least 3 research sub-projects, all supervised by junior investigators • A clear plan for mentoring, career development and graduation and replacement of junior investigators • Long-term plans for developing and sustaining the center, investigators, collaborations, and physical infrastructure
    5. 5. Model of COBRE Pilot Projects External Advisory Boardresearch cores bioinformatics administrative Administrative Mentored and Research Junior Investigator Cores Mentors •workshops Subprojects •training courses
    6. 6. Develop advanced research infrastructure and a critical mass of investigators in thematic areas Research Research Cores Research Infrastructure that are essential Infrastructure for basic and Research Projects Research Projects clinical research (Junior and Senior(Junior Investigators) Investigators) Pilot Project Program
    7. 7. The COBRE Program in Oklahoma
    8. 8. Expected: $14.5MActual: $18M or 125% more than expected by doubling and increase in faculty number by 33%
    9. 9. Figure 3. Transition of RR15577 COBRE supported cores from initial funding to current plans. Blue designates RR15577COBRE support. Purple denotes proposed RR15577 support and white outline only denotes institutional or other forms ofindependent support from grants, charge backs or other funding sources.
    10. 10. NIH Funding – OUHSC $70,000,000 Total OUHSC NIH Funding 2000-2011 – 152% increase ($21 – $53 million)* $60,000,000 Total NIH Budget Allocation 2000-2011 – 67% increase ($18 - $30 billion) $50,000,000 $40,000,000 Begin INBRE/COBRE $30,000,000 $20,000,000 $10,000,000 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 NIH Fiscal Year*Comparative increases: Non IDeA State Med Schools 2000-2011 IDeA State Med Schools 2000-2011 Virginia Comm Univ – 62% (Ranked 59/57) KUMC – 104% (Ranked 71/59) PSU at Hershey Med Ctr – 50% (Ranked 64/61) Nebraska Med Ctr – 154% (Ranked 74/68) Univ Conn SOM – 26% (Ranked 68/74) Univ Louisville – 154% (Ranked 79/72)(Blue Ridge Inst. For Med Res: Ranking 2001-2011) OUHSC – 152% (Ranked 78/73)
    11. 11. “Science in a Culture ofMentoring” Operational from 2000-2014 Awarded $21.7M plus $28.8M in additional grants: * 14 RO1’s * 9 R21’s * 1 RO3 * 18 non-NIH grants Launched 12 independent research careers Advances immunology research in Oklahoma through recruiting junior scientists. Their research topics include vaccine immunology, autoimmunity, Alzheimer’s research, and other complex human diseases.
    12. 12. “Biofilm Formation andMetabolism on DentalSurfaces” Operational from 2000-2010 Awarded $9.7M, with the junior investigators receiving an additional $14M: * 9 RO1’s * 24 non-NIH grants Recruits investigators to examine microbial formation on teeth in order to translate research knowledge into treatment and prevention of oral disease.
    13. 13. “Functional Genomic/ProteomicAnalysis of Bacterial/HostInteractions” Operational from 2000-2010 Awarded $20.9M plus $31M in additional grants: * 10 RO1’s * 7 R21’s * 1 RO3 * 27 non-NIH grants Supported 8 junior investigators Used genome-scale and proteomic analysis of bacterial pathogenesis in order to increase the understanding of bacterial and host interactions.
    14. 14. “Mentoring VisionResearch in Oklahoma” Operational from 2002-2012 Awarded $23.8M plus $33.5M in additional grants: * 13 RO1’s * 5 R21’s * 1 RO3 * 6 non-NIH grants Improves vision research through the mentoring of early career investigators and develops support for the infrastructure of vision research programs
    15. 15. “Post-Translational Modificationin Host Defense: InterdisciplinaryResearch in Vascular Biology” Operational from 2003-2015 Awarded $22.2M plus an additional $11M: * 6 RO1’s * 25 non-NIH grants Studies the function of diverse protein modifications used in host defense; builds interdisciplinary program in cardiovascular biology.
    16. 16. “Molecular Mechanismsand Genetics ofAutoimmunity” Operational from 2004-2014 Awarded $24.9M plus $10.7M in additional grants: * 4 RO1’s * 2 R21’s * 1 RO3 * 13 non-NIH grants Recruited 8 new faculty members Examines disease processes and potential genetic risk factors in order to understand development and progression of autoimmune disorders
    17. 17. “Mentoring DiabetesResearch in Oklahoma” Operational from 2007-2012 Supports 5 junior investigators * 3 RO1’s * 3 additional NIH grants *13 non-NIH grants Mentors junior investigators in diabetes research to facilitate translational research toward the development of new treatments and preventive measures for diabetes.
    18. 18. Per Capita NIH Dollars (Selected States) 2011 2011 DollarsState NIH dollars Population Per CapitaVT $ 53M 626,431 $ 85HI $ 61M 1,374,810 $ 44OK $ 82M 3,791,508 $ 22MD $1.69B 5,828,289 $290MA $2.51B 6,587,536 $381
    19. 19. The IDeA program has transformed biomedical science at theOklahoma Medical Research Foundationand in the state of Oklahoma as a whole.
    20. 20. IDeA has been the best investment ever madeby Congress or the NIH in the history of biomedical research.
    21. 21. Thank you

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