Amateurs and Professionals in Information Technology

875 views

Published on

This is a talk I gave while a guest of Greg Downey at the School of Information Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Published in: Technology, Career
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
875
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
11
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Note personalized first page
  • A handful of people responded to that ad, and later that year Jim sent seven of them the first issue of The Videophile’s Newsletter. In that first 4-page issue he wrote about collecting videotapes in short, hand-typed paragraphs: “What I would most like to do is trade tapes with those of you who are willing to keep an eye out for my wants, while I will, of course, do the same for you. At present I have neither the time nor the inclination to be a taping service (e.g. tape every episode of certain shows every day for someone). As much as possible I would like to keep things on a strict hobby-type nonprofit basis. I have no desire to gouge you for the opportunity to see shows that are of interest to you if it is within my ability to bring them to you.” In the following two pages, Jim outlined the specific shows he was interested in, even going so far as to include the TV Guide listings from their original air date.
  • A handful of people responded to that ad, and later that year Jim sent seven of them the first issue of The Videophile’s Newsletter. In that first 4-page issue he wrote about collecting videotapes in short, hand-typed paragraphs: “What I would most like to do is trade tapes with those of you who are willing to keep an eye out for my wants, while I will, of course, do the same for you. At present I have neither the time nor the inclination to be a taping service (e.g. tape every episode of certain shows every day for someone). As much as possible I would like to keep things on a strict hobby-type nonprofit basis. I have no desire to gouge you for the opportunity to see shows that are of interest to you if it is within my ability to bring them to you.” In the following two pages, Jim outlined the specific shows he was interested in, even going so far as to include the TV Guide listings from their original air date.
  • A handful of people responded to that ad, and later that year Jim sent seven of them the first issue of The Videophile’s Newsletter. In that first 4-page issue he wrote about collecting videotapes in short, hand-typed paragraphs: “What I would most like to do is trade tapes with those of you who are willing to keep an eye out for my wants, while I will, of course, do the same for you. At present I have neither the time nor the inclination to be a taping service (e.g. tape every episode of certain shows every day for someone). As much as possible I would like to keep things on a strict hobby-type nonprofit basis. I have no desire to gouge you for the opportunity to see shows that are of interest to you if it is within my ability to bring them to you.” In the following two pages, Jim outlined the specific shows he was interested in, even going so far as to include the TV Guide listings from their original air date.
  • shift gears
  • folksonomy,
  • The Turk was a famous hoax which purported to be a chess-playing machine. Constructed and unveiled in 1770 by the Hungarian baron Wolfgang von Kempelen (1734–1804), the mechanism appeared to be able to play a strong game of chess against a human opponent, as well as perform the knight's tour, a puzzle which requires the player to move a knight to occupy every square of a chess board once and only once.

    Publicly promoted as an automaton, the Turk was given its common name based on its appearance, and was a mechanical illusion that allowed a human chess master to hide inside and operate the machine. With a skilled operator, the Turk won most of the games it played. The apparatus was demonstrated around Europe and the United States of America for over 80 years until its destruction in 1854, playing and defeating many challengers including statesmen such as Napoleon Bonaparte and Benjamin Franklin.
  • Surowiecki makes an important point about tagging, and about crowd wisdom in general: it only works when individuals aren’t conscious of the larger crowd.
  • Amateurs and Professionals in Information Technology

    1. 1. Amateur 2.0 Thinking about Labor in the Web 2.0 era
    2. 2. Videophiles ca. 1977
    3. 3. Videophile Community
    4. 4. Videophile Community “[In 1976] I used to lug my 50 pound SL7200 over to [a friend’s] house, we’d go up in his attic, where we had some room, and we dubbed tapes, and I’d bring it back that night or the next day to my house.”
    5. 5. Videophile Community “[In 1976] I used to lug my 50 pound SL7200 over to [a friend’s] house, we’d go up in his attic, where we had some room, and we dubbed tapes, and I’d bring it back that night or the next day to my house.” Tinkering to connect Betamaxes for dubbing
    6. 6. Videophile Community “[In 1976] I used to lug my 50 pound SL7200 over to [a friend’s] house, we’d go up in his attic, where we had some room, and we dubbed tapes, and I’d bring it back that night or the next day to my house.” Tinkering to connect Betamaxes for dubbing Taping parties
    7. 7. Videophile Community “[In 1976] I used to lug my 50 pound SL7200 over to [a friend’s] house, we’d go up in his attic, where we had some room, and we dubbed tapes, and I’d bring it back that night or the next day to my house.” Tinkering to connect Betamaxes for dubbing Taping parties Video conventions (Video Collectors of Ohio, etc.)
    8. 8. “What I would most like to do is trade tapes with those of you who are willing to keep an eye out for my wants, while I will, of course, do the same for you. At present I have neither the time nor the inclination to be a taping service (e.g. tape every episode of certain shows every day for someone). As much as possible I would like to keep things on a strict hobby-type nonprofit basis. I have no desire to gouge you for the opportunity to see shows that are of interest to you if it is within my ability to bring them to you.” (Jim Lowe, The Videophile’s Newsletter, 1976)
    9. 9. “What I would most like to do is trade tapes with those of you who are willing to keep an eye out for my wants, while I will, of course, do the same for you. At present I have neither the time nor the inclination to be a taping service (e.g. tape every episode of certain shows every day for someone). As much as possible I would like to keep things on a strict hobby-type nonprofit basis. I have no desire to gouge you for the opportunity to see shows that are of interest to you if it is within my ability to bring them to you.” (Jim Lowe, The Videophile’s Newsletter, 1976)
    10. 10. “What I would most like to do is trade tapes with those of you who are willing to keep an eye out for my wants, while I will, of course, do the same for you. At present I have neither the time nor the inclination to be a taping service (e.g. tape every episode of certain shows every day for someone). As much as possible I would like to keep things on a strict hobby-type nonprofit basis. I have no desire to gouge you for the opportunity to see shows that are of interest to you if it is within my ability to bring them to you.” (Jim Lowe, The Videophile’s Newsletter, 1976)
    11. 11. “Amateurs”
    12. 12. Videophiles
    13. 13. Videophiles Audiophiles
    14. 14. Videophiles Audiophiles Computer Hackers
    15. 15. Videophiles Audiophiles Computer Hackers Hot Rod Tinkerers
    16. 16. Videophiles Audiophiles Computer Hackers Hot Rod Tinkerers Ham Radio Operators
    17. 17. Videophiles Audiophiles Computer Hackers Hot Rod Tinkerers Ham Radio Operators DIY Culture
    18. 18. “Amateurs”
    19. 19. “Professionals”
    20. 20. Professional vs. Amateur
    21. 21. Professional vs. Amateur Outward motivation
    22. 22. Professional vs. Amateur Outward motivation Market, client, salary
    23. 23. Professional vs. Amateur Outward motivation Market, client, salary “Work” (valuable)
    24. 24. Professional vs. Amateur Outward motivation Market, client, salary “Work” (valuable) Employee, Labor
    25. 25. Professional vs. Amateur Outward motivation Inward motivation Market, client, salary “Work” (valuable) Employee, Labor
    26. 26. Professional vs. Amateur Outward motivation Inward motivation Market, client, “Love” salary “Work” (valuable) Employee, Labor
    27. 27. Professional vs. Amateur Outward motivation Inward motivation Market, client, “Love” salary “Leisure” (frivolous) “Work” (valuable) Employee, Labor
    28. 28. Professional vs. Amateur Outward motivation Inward motivation Market, client, “Love” salary “Leisure” (frivolous) “Work” (valuable) Enthusiast, Hobbyist Employee, Labor
    29. 29. Professional vs. Amateur mac vs. pc
    30. 30. Why Study Amateurs?
    31. 31. Why Study Amateurs? Point us toward overlooked sites/ populations
    32. 32. Why Study Amateurs? Point us toward overlooked sites/ populations Examine the gray areas of production and consumption
    33. 33. Why Study Amateurs? Point us toward overlooked sites/ populations Examine the gray areas of production and consumption Better understand the relationship between identity and work
    34. 34. Zotero
    35. 35. demo
    36. 36. Zotero Server
    37. 37. Zotero Server Seamless backup, remote access to database
    38. 38. Zotero Server Seamless backup, remote access to database Sharing / Collaboration
    39. 39. Zotero Server Seamless backup, remote access to database Sharing / Collaboration Social tagging
    40. 40. Zotero Server Seamless backup, remote access to database Sharing / Collaboration Social tagging Granular item & folder-level permissions (view/edit items, attachments, notes)
    41. 41. Web 2.0 Source: O’Reilly, “What is Web 2.0” (http:// www.oreillynet.com/lpt/a/6228)
    42. 42. Web 2.0 Coined by Tim O’Reilly Source: O’Reilly, “What is Web 2.0” (http:// www.oreillynet.com/lpt/a/6228)
    43. 43. Web 2.0 Coined by Tim O’Reilly “The central principle behind the success of the giants born in the Web 1.0 era who have survived to lead the Web 2.0 era appears to be this, that they have embraced the power of the Source: O’Reilly, “What is Web 2.0” (http:// www.oreillynet.com/lpt/a/6228)
    44. 44. Source: O’Reilly, “What is Web 2.0” (http:// www.oreillynet.com/lpt/a/6228)
    45. 45. Source: O’Reilly, “What is Web 2.0” (http:// www.oreillynet.com/lpt/a/6228)
    46. 46. Amateurs on the Web
    47. 47. Amateurs on the Web Bloggers
    48. 48. Amateurs on the Web Bloggers Wikipedia
    49. 49. Amateurs on the Web Bloggers Wikipedia YouTube
    50. 50. YouTube
    51. 51. but...
    52. 52. Collaborative Filtering
    53. 53. Folksonomy
    54. 54. Folksonomy I collect things, and tag with keywords so that I can find them later.
    55. 55. Folksonomy I collect things, and tag with keywords so that I can find them later. You do the same thing.
    56. 56. Folksonomy I collect things, and tag with keywords so that I can find them later. You do the same thing. Software aggregates and statistically processes individual choices into one meta-archive.
    57. 57. Flickr
    58. 58. Upcoming
    59. 59. “Leveraging Solipsism” - Peter Merholz, Adaptive Path
    60. 60. What’s the crowd doing?
    61. 61. What’s the crowd doing? Producing value
    62. 62. What’s the crowd doing? Producing value Not paid
    63. 63. What’s the crowd doing? Producing value Not paid Not intentional
    64. 64. What’s the crowd doing? Producing value Not paid Not intentional Doesn’t fit standard definition of “work”
    65. 65. What’s the crowd doing? Producing value Not paid Not intentional Doesn’t fit standard definition of “work”
    66. 66. “Amateur”
    67. 67. “Amateur” not about skill
    68. 68. “Amateur” not about skill not about payment
    69. 69. “Amateur” not about skill not about payment (”gift economy”)
    70. 70. “Amateur” not about skill not about payment (”gift economy”) about identity and intention
    71. 71. “Amateur” not about skill not about payment (”gift economy”) about identity and intention actions are undertaken for their own sake, “for love of” the action itself
    72. 72. So what?

    ×