What works: five mobile learning success stories

343

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
343
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • GoMo packages up all web app versions so that when launching the app from Moodle it will auto-detect what type of device you are accessing the content with – it will then automatically serve up the PC/tablet or smartphone version as required. This also means that when using the web app version you can start viewing it on your PC then switch to later accessing it with your tablet or smartphone and it will keep all your tracking data consistent – you can start on one device and complete on another and all your data is saved between sessions.For learners who sometimes want to dip into an e-learning course on a smaller device, or who want to take an entire e-learning course on a smaller device, it’s important that the experience of taking that course on a smaller device is as good as the experience of taking it on a larger device. Responsive e-learning design is about ensuring that it is.
  • Narrative aids retention and meaning
  • Some statisticsA massive 270,000 people suffer a cardiac arrest every year in the UK. Around 170,000 of these are fatal (more than lung cancer, breast cancer and AIDS combined).This is the highest figure in Europe and equates to around 1750 people a week.Following cardiac arrest:For every minute that passes, chances of survival reduces by 7-10%, after 5 minutes this reduces by up to 50%.High quality resuscitation training is vitalExplain what RCUK doesExplain the way the course used to work over two days, then explain the need to reduce this – what was driving it, cost/time implications, what the issues wereCan mention the pilot here too – e-learning proven to be as effective as f2f courseWhy e-learning, why you picked Epic
  • Where appropriate, and it is especially appropriate in large organisations offering learning to people across a variety of roles, we are now frequently offering a single course which can be accessed across multiple devices.It’s worth pointing out here, that not all authoring tools are able to output to multiple devices. So if this is what you want to offer your learners, then make sure your authoring tool or supplier of choice is able to do this. And think about browsers too. If you need to support people on older browsers, as well as on modern mobile devices, make sure that this will be possible.
  • One from an A&E nurse who practically laughed when I asked if they had any protected time to train – ‘lunch would be nice’The other from a Consultant Surgeon who said to me ‘Listen, if it won’t save my patient’s lives, I don’t have time for it’.Senior physicians and team leaders do, however, respect the opinion of experts in the field – this is something they will, and have to, make time for if they are to maintain best practice.Epic conducted research before undertaking the design solution phase – this included the lead designer attending the ALS face to face course and running a focus group with participants to find out what they thought about the current training, what it meant to them and how this might translate to e-learning. It showed we had a very significant challenge on our hands!Within the target audience there are negative associations/resistance to e-learning, mainly centred around the lack of protected time, and a lack of face to face contact. Attending a face to face course gives them the opportunity to completely remove themselves from the workplace and therefore the pressures and responsibilities of their job roles.Every single participant had to prep at home, in their own time. They are all incredibly busy people and have no chance to study whilst at work. Many do not even get lunch breaks. There was a strong reaction against elearning potentially replacing the theory aspects of the course, as they feel they won’t have time (however, most of this content is clearly covered in the manual, which they are required to read before attending the course, and have been shown to have read). They all really like the manual – they like that they can take it with them and do their study anywhere, dipping in and out. Also, they are familiar with learning in this way. They are not keen to read on screen.There was a definite underlying fear that they would learn less, and that they would miss out on examples.Epic conducted research before undertaking the design solution phase – this included the lead designer attending the ALS face to face course and running a focus group with participants to find out what they thought about the current training, what it meant to them and how this might translate to e-learning. It showed we had a very significant challenge on our hands!Within the target audience there are negative associations/resistance to e-learning, mainly centred around the lack of protected time, and a lack of face to face contact. Attending a face to face course gives them the opportunity to completely remove themselves from the workplace and therefore the pressures and responsibilities of their job roles.Every single participant had to prep at home, in their own time. They are all incredibly busy people and have no chance to study whilst at work. Many do not even get lunch breaks. There was a strong reaction against elearning potentially replacing the theory aspects of the course, as they feel they won’t have time (however, most of this content is clearly covered in the manual, which they are required to read before attending the course, and have been shown to have read). They all really like the manual – they like that they can take it with them and do their study anywhere, dipping in and out. Also, they are familiar with learning in this way. They are not keen to read on screen.There was a definite underlying fear that they would learn less, and that they would miss out on examples.
  • E-learning needs and solutionWe used the information from the focus group and worked closely with RCUK SMEs to create content that would work on screen. This involved a large scoping exercise where each module was broken up into topics and screens, then cross compared against the detailed learning objectives for each module. This was an intensive process that allowed us to create the best structure and design – (the learning objectives are too detailed to cover off quickly now)The design used Epic’s Learn/Apply/Do approach divided into 11 modules that sit as separate SCOs on the Moodle LMS, giving a flexible, modular course that works as part of a blend – with a practical day following the e-learning. Each module features a ‘How do I?’ section that includes theory content and hypothetical cases with associated interactive tasks – this includes, where appropriate, scenario case studies where learners are asked to consider a patient’s symptoms, read their rhythm strip and answer associated questions or analyse their blood gas results. Learners can also check their knowledge in an end of module quiz – the scores obtained here are passed back to the Moodle, giving a measure of learning for f2f trainers. Module specific learning outcomes are also included on the main menu for each. Each of the tutorial style modules feature further resource tabs Essentials: This includes a summary of the key points or key considerations they need to remember (such as if the patient suffersfrom asthma). This will be presented as a text with optional graphic panel and will be printable.• Algorithm: this contains the relevant algorithm or step process associated with the content, e.g. this could include a flowchart of theALS algorithm,• References: this gives the learner a text only list of references or links to Web/ Moodle-held content, including the key chapterswithin the Advance Life Support manual.E-learning candidates given access to online resources from 1 month prior to attending the practical f2f course, and for 5 months after3 compulsory elements that needed to be completed before attending the f2f day – ALS in perspective, ALS Algorithm (e-lecture and quiz), Pre-course MCQ (50 questions held on the Moodle site). This targets what the learner needs to do ahead of the workshop and therefore reduces the burden of preparation on them.Continuous assessment occurs throughout in the form of scenarios and knowledge check quizzes but a final assessment comprises management of cardiac arrest simulation practical and a multiple choice questionnaire. Successful candidates receive a RC ALS Provider certificate, valued for four years, and highly regarded.Currently 126 centres delivering the course, aim to bring this up to 224 by December this year
  • Primary challenge was how we could represent the highly detailed images of rhythm strips ECGs and algorithms with medical accuracy. These aren’t, on the face of it, the most exciting content images you’ll see in e-learning courses, but the fact is that the detail shown in these simple strips saves lives. Being able to examine these in detail was imperative to making the solution work – learners needed to be able to see a large enough portion of the strip that a pattern (or lack of it) was apparent, but also required the ability to focus right in, to the point where you can count the number of squares between a specific spike and the next. Not only that, but we had the technical constraints of making this work inside a Moodle window, on PC, on iPad and on mobile phone (the screen dimensions of each varying dramatically, plus the ways in which you can interact with the technology). Our solution was a series of zoom features that worked on rollover on the PC and opened larger images on tablet and mobile phone that could then be zoomed in on to view in detail. These were available on all the rhythm strips, the ECG scans and the algorithms shown on the supporting tabsThen there was the challenge of getting the right images in the right place – without technical training, a lot of the rhythm strips look very similar – (for example, we had a diagram that a graphic artist remade to make it look cleaner for screen delivery – an arrow got moved a matter of millimetres but this actually made the diagram dangerous – not something our graphic artist would have realised – but if a shock was delivered at that exact time the patient would have died. This really brought home the need for minute detail and we had to adapt our processes to build in extra review phases to make sure that everything was medically accurate – it’s not often that e-learning becomes an issue of life or death, but this actually was!) We worked very closely with the RCUK SMEs who put a lot of time into making sure everything was really accurate.In order to analyse rhythm strips in the scenarios we created a bespoke screen type that features the rollover zoom. Learners view the strip and consider the scenario explanation, before being asked to answer five or six specific questions that allow the learner to identify the type of rhythm they are seeing presented. These questions work best when grouped. Epic designed a staggered question set, where yes/no questions became active in groups. Feedback was given for each group of answers.These formed a key part of the scenario challenges.Another bespoke feature was the e-lecture – this was really important to convey some of the most important, highly technical content – as we have seen, this lecture style also appeals to the learners, as highlighted in the focus group feedback. It lets the people who present the lectures in the previous f2f training actually present on the e-learning platform – building bridges between the e-learning and the practical part of the course. It also allowed the presenter to free up some time, so that their energy could be directed at the practical demonstrations on the f2f element. E-lecture also features a ‘jump to’ navigation at the bottom of the screen, allowing learners to move with ease to find a specific area of the content without having to sit through the lengthy presentation if they have already completed the topic. This was adapted for the Smartphone offering and the small screen size by keeping the audio but removing the video window, and running this in conjunction with the presentation slides. Selecting images from the slides would pause the video automatically while the images is explored.Information anytime, any placeAny time any place learning – this was something that was identified in the focus group as desirable and something that was achieved across a variety of platforms.Produced in DHTMLMoodle site uses device recognition to show learners the appropriate course version – PC, iPad, iPhone and Android.Smartphone course was built in GoMo, Epic’s unique mobile authoring tool. The course was converted using a mixture of standard and bespoke asset types, but the plan was that redesign should be minimised where possible whilst retaining as many of the original features as possible.The treatment of standard interaction types was the same as that shown in the e-learning course, but converted to work on the small screen. In most instances this meant conversion to a vertical layout with reduced space. The ways in which the learner interacts with these screens was similar to the current interactions.Given the smaller size of the screen on mobiles, bespoke screens needed redesigning in order to cover the same learning points through similar interactions. This refers particularly to e-lecture screens and screens where learners need to examine ECGs and rhythm strips. – E-lectures were a combination of audio synched with thumbnail images that could be explored, pausing the video until the learner is ready to continue. A magnifying glass icon was added to each rhythm strip to access a zoom feature where required, allowing learners to enlarge the images to the point where it was possible to accurately count the squares on rhythm strips and explore the patterns through swiping. Custom hot graphics were treated via a simple ‘key’ and colour coding (this was to avoid the problem of sub-screens within sub-screens).red.
  • The launch of e-ALS is a major innovationIt’s the first ever resuscitation e-learning course to be properly evaluated in terms of outcomes and efficacy. Initial reactions from Educators and Clinical Managers in hospitals was positive about the efficiencies that could be achievedThe success has exceeded expectations – describe84 professionals who completed the course in 2011 were surveyedEffectiveness of learning strategy(On scale of 1 (agree/very good) to 6 (disagree/very poor)I enjoyed the course: 1.7The course improved my knowledge: 1.8Quality of mentoring support: 1.7Quality of feedback received in directing your learning: 1.8Individual course elements: 1.8Impact on performanceWhile it is impossible to quantify the impact of the course on patient outcomes, the practical application of knowledge in the workplace has been assessed in addition to knowledge acquisition. The survey asked the following:I anticipate attending the course will improve patient outcomes: 1.8I anticipate the course will improve my clinical practice: 1.8I learned and applied new technical skills during the course: 2
  • Some testimonials provided by candidates include:: “I really enjoyed the e-ALS course. I found it much more useful to cover the relevant parts of the course online in my own time then apply the knowledge on the day. I also felt I retained more information this way as I was able to do small chunks of revision at a time online...” e-ALS candidate, CT3 Trainee in Emergency Medicine: “e-learning was completely new to me and I was not comfortable doing the on-line lectures for fear of making a mess of things. However, I survived and managed it ok which taught me new things that will come in use in the future. Because it was e-learning I was able to do the on-line lectures undisturbed in my own home with unlimited coffee and cake!!! This is a fabulous course!” – e-ALS candidate, Band 7-9, Resuscitation Officer: “I took the course two days ago and have just received the link to the certificate. I just wanted to email and say thanks and that I thought the course was of the absolute highest standard. I am due to start back in the hospital as a medical registrar next week. I was a little concerned about being rusty when having to run cardiac arrests etc but after doing the pre-course work and spending the day going over scenarios I am much more confident about going back into clinical medicine.” – e-ALS candidate, Medical Registrar
  • In 2010 and 2012 Epic undertook research for the NHS on the potential benefits of mobile learning. This uncovered the obvious benefit for any business case on mobile learning – that it is more convenience. Just over 75% of practitioners agreed that it would be more convenient and over 80% of managers.2. So gone are the days of booking out an afternoon to go on a course, or having to find a free computer terminal somewhere. 3. And the learning is more timely too – you can have access on a time-needed basis when most convenientThe first is a mobile workforceThe second is difficulty of accessing PCs The third is using mobile devices people already have so avoiding barrier to becoming familiar with the technology
  • In March this year football fans watched in horror when Bolton Wanderers player, FabriceMuamba collapsed at White Hart Lane during the FA Cup Quarter Final against Tottenham Hotspur.He had suffered a cardiac arrest.Dr Andrew Deaner, Consultant Cardiologist at the London Chest Hospital was at the game and ran onto the pitch to lend his expertise.The reason Muamba is still alive was down to the quality of the resuscitation being performed and the care he received, on the pitch, in the ambulance and at the London Chest Hospital – he was effectively ‘dead’ for 78 minutes.This is one person’s story – it was public so everyone was aware, but the likelihood is that we all know someone who has sustained a cardiac arrest.
  • What works: five mobile learning success stories

    1. 1. What works:Five mobile learningsuccess storiesImogen CasebourneDirector of Learning@epictalkUSA For all the latest news, insight and resources follow us on Twitter @epictalkUSA @icasebourne
    2. 2. @epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    3. 3. Five mobile case studiesAgustaWestland –multi-devicelearning forpilotsUniversityConsortium –Multi-devicelearning forUniversitystaffBritish Army– mobilegamesbasedlearningResusCouncil –multi-devicetraining forHealthcareworkersHarper Collins – just intime mobile studying forkids in high school
    4. 4. @epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success storiesBritish ArmyGames-basedlearning
    5. 5. The problem – low levels of numeracySome recruits couldn’t move onArmy deprived of otherwise talentedsoldiers@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    6. 6. Focusgroups toexplore theproblem@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    7. 7. Active learnersSent back to schoolWith homeworkThe classroom isn’t always the answer@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    8. 8. Why mobile technology?1. Can be carried everywhere2. Offers opportunistic learning in ‘found’ time3. Whenever/wherever4. Discreet – doesn’t screamout ‘homework’5. Familiar/comfortable@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    9. 9. Why Nintendo DS?NintendoDSSony PSP Apple i-touchPDA SmartphonePortability     Penetration     Stylus    2 screens Robust @epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    10. 10. Why games-based learning?1. Repeat practice2. Immediate feedback3. A sense of challenge4. Friendly competition@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    11. 11. Learning bydoing@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    12. 12. Operation Numerika!@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    13. 13. @epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    14. 14. Lesshard work@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    15. 15. Excitement!@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    16. 16. Key takeawaysAsk yourself:• Who• Where• Why@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    17. 17. HigherEducationInformation Security SuiteCollaboratively developedwith 5 UK universities......but all use differentplatforms and devices.@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    18. 18. Multiple devices@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    19. 19. Multi-device learning@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    20. 20. Bringing the learning to life• Bruner (2002) – stories are essential toour comprehension of the world andfundamental to learning• Use the authentic voice – someonelike me• Use artefacts and visual hooks@epictalkUSA @icasebourne#mlearn.com
    21. 21. Key takeaways• Future proof• Use narrative@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    22. 22. @epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    23. 23. Resus – multi-devicelearning for healthcare@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    24. 24. “It’s very well having it to look at theory behind thepractice but at the end of the day, we’re practicalpeople.”Staff Nurse, Critical Care@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    25. 25. E-learning solutionLearners need to study in their owntime. Learning needs to besuccinct and focused.Content carefully chunked into manageablesections.Time required clearly highlighted.Bookmarking available.Focus group concernsConcern that the face-to-faceelement is removed, as there is nofeedback or chance to hear reallife examples.Opportunities for learners to apply and test theirknowledge. Instant feedback to questions.Real life examples and challenging scenariocontent for learners to work through and makedecisions to mirror real life.E-lecture content and slide deck showing lecturesby the people who present on the f2f course.ALS manual very popular andfamiliar way to learn.Design uses the manual as part of the blendedsolution; learners pointed to background andfurther reading.Positive reaction to idea of mobilelearning.Course designed to work on mobile platforms viaweb app for iPad, accessed through Moodle site.Separate course with design features specifically forsmartphone.@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    26. 26. @epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    27. 27. Retained more ...@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    28. 28. Learner/stakeholder reactions:Scale: 1 = agree/very good 6 = disagree/very poor@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    29. 29. I was able to do the on-line lectures undisturbed in myown home with unlimited coffee and cake!!! This is afabulous course!” e-ALS candidate, Band 7-9,Resuscitation Officer@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    30. 30. Research on healthcare workers in general@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    31. 31. Key takeaways• Consider timings• Offer flexibility• Offer choice@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    32. 32. Agusta Westland – DistanceLearning on tablet & PC@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success storieshttp://youtu.be/0rO-M3e5WZc
    33. 33. The briefHelicopter pilots are self-led and want to learnin their own time – would like to cut down onclassroom trainingSimulator time is strictly limitedDistance learning could be the answerAW TNA revealed most pilots had tablets!@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    34. 34. The blendFace-to-facePC Tablet SimulatorExplore andunderstand Practice Discuss @epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    35. 35. Key takeaways• Part of a blend?• Check tone@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    36. 36. Harper CollinsJust-in-time learning forhigh school math@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    37. 37. Source: KPMG@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    38. 38. 400 pages1400 questions1200 examples@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    39. 39. But ...
    40. 40. Research informed ourmobile strategyMulti-platform marketUser testing and focusgroups at every stage@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    41. 41. @epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    42. 42. @epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    43. 43. so mucheasier@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    44. 44. moreengaging@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    45. 45. @epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    46. 46. Teachers lovethem too!@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    47. 47. More than35,000downloads@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    48. 48. @epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    49. 49. @epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    50. 50. Key takeaways• People use smartphones differently• Consider appropriate solutions• May be just-in-time or reviewing@epictalkUSA @icasebourne#mlearn.com
    51. 51. To sum up@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    52. 52. Questions?@epictalkUSA @icasebourne What works: 5 mobile learning success stories
    53. 53. epiclearninggroup.comICasebourne@epiclearninggroup.com@epictalkUSA @icasebourneFor all the latest news, insight and resources follow us on Twitter @epictalkUSA

    ×