The evidence:mobile learning in the NHS@HEAcademy@epictalk For all the latest news about the event follow us on Twitter@ep...
What did we want to know?@epictalk #mRealDeal@HEAcademy
Research findings@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
Peer reviewedby:Research@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
Findings
Device usage by age
PC access by age
Device ownership by role@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
Findings74.8%Findings convenience15.4% strongly agreed35.2% agreed24.2% slightly agreed74.8%83.3% of themanager surveyresp...
Findings74.8%Findings: no queues19.8% strongly agreed30.8% agreed22.0% slightly agreed72.6% of the staffrespondentsappreci...
Findings74.8%19.4% strongly agreed41.7% agreed16.7% slightly agreed77.8% of the 36managers agreed@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRea...
74.8%Findings: relevance13.2% strongly agreed33.0% agreed33.0% slightly agreed79.2% (of 91) staffbelieved that amobile dev...
74.8%Findings19.4% strongly agreed41.7% agreed16.7% slightly agreed77.8% of the 36managers shared thisview@HEAcademy@epict...
74.8%Findings: found time22% strongly agreed33% agreed18.7% slightly agreedOf 91 practitionersurvey respondents,73.7% woul...
74.8%Findings19.4% strongly agreed36.1% agreed13.9% slightly agreed69.4% (of the 44managers) agreed@HEAcademy@epictalk #mR...
Pilot apps
74.8%Research findings17% hadheard of it83% hadn’theard of it@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
74.8%Research findings9% hadheard of itMost weren’taware@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
74.8%When asked why they had chosen to access it fromhome, users cited concerns about Wi-Fi coverage atworkWorking from ho...
WiFi access by roleUnansweredDon’t knowNeverRarelyAccess forsome timeeach daySometimes,dependingon locationAll or most oft...
Marketing and implementation@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
How will we use the findings?@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
Deploy to multiple devices andoperating systems@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
Provide as an option and as partof a blend
PLEASEUSEMYAPP!Work harder at promotion!
Pilot and test with a wide rangeof potential users
Bundle with referenceresources.... align with othermobile initiatives@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
Put supportive policiesin place@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
@HEAcademy@epictalk8 participantsEach building anappWebinarsPeer supportAction learning set#mRealDeal
@HEAcademy@epictalkDownload the pilot apps#mRealDealCompatibility of Injectable Medicines (iTunes)Compatibility of Injecta...
@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDealicasebourne@epiclearninggroup.comhelen.bingham@wessex.hee.nhs.ukThank you
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The evidence - mobile learning in the NHS

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Imogen Casebourne and Helen Bingham presented a session at 'Mobile learning: the real deal' detailing the findings from a research report undertaken into the potential benefits of mobile learning within the NHS. View the video of Imogen and Helen's presentation here - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Flem4bqdDbI

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  • Why did we commission the research?An evidence base for our work – we have many requests for apps – but limited resources, so development decisions need to be informed and strategicThe 2010 research provided invaluable pointers and snapshot of needs/preferences, barriers/challenges, device ownership etc at that time – but 2 years a long time in fast-moving arena so update required – same methodologies used to enable comparison
  • Intro text
  • We contacted over 250 NHS workers in a variety of roles and at varying levels of seniority and in different organisations. We also talked to technical staff about Wi-Fi provision and learning management systems. We created surveys, held focus groups, and carried out telephone interviews, as well as drawing on state of the art research.We set out to find out what mobile devices they had access to, how they were using technology to support learning, and what they wanted from future learning provision. We found that a surprisingly high proportion of staff already had access to suitable mobile devices, and were very open to using their own devices to learn via mobile technologies. With this in mind, we created a pilot app, and trialled it with a group of NHS workers. Then after a period of time, we conducted another study, to find out whether attitudes, access and mobile device ownership had changed over the intervening 18 months, and also to find out how the pilot apps had been received.
  • And this is what we found
  • This is an overview of who is most likely to have a smartphone or tablet, broken down by age-group.
  • When asked whether it was easy for them to access a computer, the younger respondents were less likely to say yes.
  • Of course, we also looked at roles – as people are less likely to have regular access to a PC in some roles. As you can see, this small sample suggests that ambulance workers may be ahead of the curve, but it’s actually a not big enough sample to make such a sweeping generalisation.
  • 74.8% believed that a mobile device for learning would make it more convenient for them to undertake training, because they would not have to leave the workplace.[1] 83.3% of the 36 manager survey respondents shared this opinion.  [1] 15.4% strongly agreed; 35.2% agreed and 24.2% slightly agreed.
  • 72.6% of the staff respondents appreciated the fact that they would not have to wait to access a computer[2]. [2] 19.8% strongly agreed; 30.8% agreed and 22.0% slightly agreed.
  • 77.8% of the 36 managers agreed[3]. [3] 19.4% strongly agreed; 41.7% agreed and 16.7% slightly agreed.
  • 79.2% (of 91) staff believed that a mobile device for learning would make training more relevant, as it could take place in the work setting where the training is put into practice[4]. [4] 13.2% strongly agreed; 33.0% agreed and 33.0% slightly agreed.
  • 77.8% of the 36 managers shared this view.[5][5] 19.4% strongly agreed; 41.7% agreed and 16.7% slightly agreed.
  • Another benefit which emerged was the good use of ‘dead time’:  of 91 practitioner survey respondents, 73.7% would be likely to use a mobile device for learning during ‘dead time’, for example when waiting for a clinic to begin, or an emergency call[6].   [6] 22% strongly agreed; 33% agreed and 18.7% slightly agreed.
  • 69.4% (of the 44 managers) agreed[7].[7] 19.4% strongly agreed; 36.1% agreed and 13.9% slightly agreed.
  • Of respondents to the survey of potential users of the Health and Safety assessment, nine (17%) had heard of it and 43 hadn’t heard of it (83%). Of the respondents who had heard of it, a further two reported that they weren’t sure where to find or download it [S-HS]. Only one respondent to the general survey had tried using any of the apps, and 48.8% reported that they were unaware of either of the two pilot medical apps (Compatibility of Injectable Medicines and Adult Drug Calculations) [SG-S] and [SG-M]
  • Of respondents to the general survey, again, many people weren’t aware of the pilot medical apps.
  • Once you have a learner journey with a map of touch points, you have a better idea of the messages you need to get across.For each person in your segment, you the craft your messages.
  • Overall evidence of strong support and growth potential for mobile as key part of learning offer for health care staff.....but how are we using/will we use the results to inform our practice?The report recommendations are usefully clustered under headings – deployment, design, publicity, technical – if you don’t read any other section of the report, do read this part!
  • And – bearing in mind NHS wifi limitations - provide a PC version....We have done this – and it is one of the advantages of using GoMo
  • Accepting that mobile learning will appeal to some but not all, provide it as an option e.g. H&S app an alternative to eLearning or classroomBlended learning long talked about but not something we are good at – classroom/eLearning/mLearning/clinsim/e-ref tools regarded as separate and developed in isolation – but more effective in blend – eg eLearning for theory, clinsim for practice, app for refresher
  • Recognised as area of weaknessRecommendations point to the need for clear branding, a strap line, wifi maps, etcFor neonatal drug calculations app we have a full comms plan, including focus groups with different groups (SMEs, learners, HEIs, students), early adopter champions, twitter, RSS feeds and promotional video
  • (not just unfeasibly good looking ones!)Have always tried to do this, but now in a more structured way – focus groups
  • ...and bear in mind that whilst research respondents had good enthusiasm for mobile learning, appetite for quick ref and decision-support apps even higher. Our PMLD app is a ‘top tips’ reference resource, and our latest project is decision support for pre-operative tests
  • And finally (though more recommendations and ideas in report) Supportive IT and HR policies – BYOD and policies on use of mobiles at work, LMSs that support tracking, improved wifi, policies In our roles, we cannot directly influence Trust policies – but we can raise awareness of issues and solutions and upskill staff in Trusts -
  • Action learning set – each participant to develop and publish one app for use on both Apple and Blackberry Smartphone using GoMo 8 participants – two are speaking this afternoonMonthly webinars led by ImogenQuarterly action learning set meetingsPeer support
  • Action learning set – each participant to develop and publish one app for use on both Apple and Blackberry Smartphone using GoMo 8 participants – two are speaking this afternoonMonthly webinars led by ImogenQuarterly action learning set meetingsPeer support
  • The evidence - mobile learning in the NHS

    1. 1. The evidence:mobile learning in the NHS@HEAcademy@epictalk For all the latest news about the event follow us on Twitter@epictalk @HEAacademy and use the hashtag #mRealDealImogen Casebourne, Epic and Helen Bingham,Health Education Thames Valley and HealthEducation Wessex
    2. 2. What did we want to know?@epictalk #mRealDeal@HEAcademy
    3. 3. Research findings@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    4. 4. Peer reviewedby:Research@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    5. 5. Findings
    6. 6. Device usage by age
    7. 7. PC access by age
    8. 8. Device ownership by role@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    9. 9. Findings74.8%Findings convenience15.4% strongly agreed35.2% agreed24.2% slightly agreed74.8%83.3% of themanager surveyrespondentsshared this opinion@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    10. 10. Findings74.8%Findings: no queues19.8% strongly agreed30.8% agreed22.0% slightly agreed72.6% of the staffrespondentsappreciated the factthat they would nothave to wait to accessa computer@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    11. 11. Findings74.8%19.4% strongly agreed41.7% agreed16.7% slightly agreed77.8% of the 36managers agreed@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    12. 12. 74.8%Findings: relevance13.2% strongly agreed33.0% agreed33.0% slightly agreed79.2% (of 91) staffbelieved that amobile device forlearning would maketraining morerelevant, as it couldtake place in the worksetting where thetraining is put intopractice@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    13. 13. 74.8%Findings19.4% strongly agreed41.7% agreed16.7% slightly agreed77.8% of the 36managers shared thisview@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    14. 14. 74.8%Findings: found time22% strongly agreed33% agreed18.7% slightly agreedOf 91 practitionersurvey respondents,73.7% would be likelyto use a mobile devicefor learning during‘dead time’, forexample when waitingfor a clinic to begin oran emergency call@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    15. 15. 74.8%Findings19.4% strongly agreed36.1% agreed13.9% slightly agreed69.4% (of the 44managers) agreed@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    16. 16. Pilot apps
    17. 17. 74.8%Research findings17% hadheard of it83% hadn’theard of it@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    18. 18. 74.8%Research findings9% hadheard of itMost weren’taware@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    19. 19. 74.8%When asked why they had chosen to access it fromhome, users cited concerns about Wi-Fi coverage atworkWorking from home“We did not haveWi-Fi access atthat time in thehospital.”“Were not allowedWi-Fi or mobiledevices becausewe are a secureunit.”@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    20. 20. WiFi access by roleUnansweredDon’t knowNeverRarelyAccess forsome timeeach daySometimes,dependingon locationAll or most ofthe timeDon’t knowNeverRarelyAccess forsome timeeach daySometimes,dependingon locationAll or most ofthe timeSurvey respondents’ access toWi-Fi at work (staff)Survey respondents’ access toWi-Fi at work (managers)As shown below, managers were morelikely than staff to report regular Wi-Fiaccess at work.@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    21. 21. Marketing and implementation@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    22. 22. How will we use the findings?@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    23. 23. Deploy to multiple devices andoperating systems@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    24. 24. Provide as an option and as partof a blend
    25. 25. PLEASEUSEMYAPP!Work harder at promotion!
    26. 26. Pilot and test with a wide rangeof potential users
    27. 27. Bundle with referenceresources.... align with othermobile initiatives@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    28. 28. Put supportive policiesin place@HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDeal
    29. 29. @HEAcademy@epictalk8 participantsEach building anappWebinarsPeer supportAction learning set#mRealDeal
    30. 30. @HEAcademy@epictalkDownload the pilot apps#mRealDealCompatibility of Injectable Medicines (iTunes)Compatibility of Injectable Medicines (Googleplay)Adult Drug Calculations (Google play)Adult Drug Calculations (iTunes)Health and Safety Awareness (iTunes)
    31. 31. @HEAcademy@epictalk #mRealDealicasebourne@epiclearninggroup.comhelen.bingham@wessex.hee.nhs.ukThank you
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