0
SER/VE (STEM Exploratory     Real/Virtual Environment):  connecting science education and       urban youth, virtually    ...
Agenda: intended; many pictures• Evolution & development of SER/VE  – Rationale & need  – Progress within virtual spaces  ...
Poll of attendees• Your STEM interests?• Your experience in K12 . . . In high needs?• Have you ever considered a virtual  ...
Background of instructor, need,  and project – the perfect storm• Instructor – Science Technology Engineering  Math (STEM)...
Background of instructor, need,  and project – the perfect storm• Need – from working within science and then  within educ...
Parts-and-pieces science . . . just using technology isn’t enough
Labs that are just about proving what is already known . . . in a very cook-               book way
Benefits to SER/VE work• Student engagement in 21st century skills  – Technology, communications, expanded    connections ...
PRIMARY MOTIVATION FOR WORKING    WITH VIRTUAL LEARNING• Kids learn this way• Kids are engaged, challenge, tested, and  ex...
Reviewing the history of workingwithin virtual environments:
MAT Science Center – location of many     meetings & presentations
MAT students from across the state    give virtual presentations
Met the Dean . . . and other      professionals
Plus, there are many good STEMactivities already available withinvirtual spaces like Second Life, for            instance ...
You can participate in field trips:      International     Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)
Attended class meeting using ISTE              space
Visit virtual science: i.e.., NationalOceanographic & Atmospheric Admin. (NOAA)
NOAA – virtual, real-time weather       Map (Northeast)
And, much more in education and           culture
Best expressed through an instructional metaphor: like    designing an intelligent experience (field trip /       discussi...
It was time to begin developing the      K12 environment  SER/VE:• A private island in Second Life was secured &  develop...
During the development phase, we looked intowhat K12 students do naturally in a virtual space            Communications   ...
• From a development & fun six months with  the Mall of the Universe  to SER/VE  – The STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Envi...
With sophisticated interiors
Students learned & practiced before        going into the mall
It even had an apartment building Many engineering, math, and technology applications were evident
However, when moving into the pilot  phase modifications were made as   recommended by grant funders:• Focused only on the...
The STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment(SER/VE) – the main Science Center w/ the bulk of the              meetings a...
First week: interest, energy . . . and             confusion
2. The first meeting; going over                                             the instructions on location           1. The...
The information website was updated weekly;            emails were sent too
An animated co-instructor helped with theweekly requirements – AKA, DaddyDarren                Denver
Later week: now paying more attention (really),because more assessments had been embedded
Additional directions were built into the placards to make it  easier to learn if no one was present to explain them
Finally, the final presentations – see the   different ways for viewing & navigating
The students & judges were very engaged       they came forward to see better
What were the pilot study results?• Students were engaged & interested  – Useful and interesting science research was    c...
Expanded the expectation for teachers –they were now to develop science meetingareas on the island                        ...
New Science PodsAssignments were developed to allow science teachers tocreate “pods” with minimal knowledge of virtual bui...
Students (scienceteachers) designed richscience projects withassociated websites thatthey shared within thevirtual spaces ...
These teacher shared their ideas about scienceprojects during meetings with other teachers . . .                  across NYS
For example, aphysics solar carpod was developed
Pods encouragedscience that movedout of the classroomand into the world
Bringing urban students into the virtual worlds, the Second Life private island – summer 2011
A workshop in the Science TechnologyEntry Program (STEP) helped students      acquire 21st century skills                 ...
Staged development process:starts with a peer discussion to    consider a game design
Students then began the design      process on paper
Students select the available “shapes”     for a 3-dimensional game
Then they use the 2-dimensionalshapes in Microsoft’s drawing program    to further develop their games
In the afternoon, students were logged onto SER/VE, to get them comfortable           in this environment
They begin to explore the island and find there they can build, and play
They tested avatar appearance and             clothing
They mastered navigation & interactions     quickly, and with enthusiasm
By the second afternoon, students areready for more creative uses of SER/VE
Creativity and boldness were evident
Texting on the computer; talking inreal time – learning new techniques
They adjusted avatars’ appearances,  and moved the camera angles
They interpreted menus & made        complex shapes
Some shapes became vehicles, with  scripts that made them move
STEP students made real advance                                    Work in person,Plan / design on    Collaborate,        ...
Value of STEM virtual – providingexpanded access for K12 & for under-represented   Meeting,      • A working space that tr...
The challenge of getting support                                                          Master’s in Learning            ...
Eileen A. OConnor, Ph.D. (Eileen.oconnor@esc.edu )Recent Publications – Emerging technologies:O’Connor, E. A. (2011) Migra...
Eileen A. OConnor, Ph.D. (Eileen.oconnor@esc.edu )Recent Publications – Emerging technologies:O’Connor, E. A. The Use of a...
Eileen A. OConnor, Ph.D. (Eileen.oconnor@esc.edu )Recent Publications – Emerging technologies:O’Connor, E. A. (2008) Movin...
SER/VE (the STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment)
SER/VE (the STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment)
SER/VE (the STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment)
SER/VE (the STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment)
SER/VE (the STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment)
SER/VE (the STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment)
SER/VE (the STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment)
SER/VE (the STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment)
SER/VE (the STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment)
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SER/VE (the STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment)

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SUNY STEM - Nov. 2011 - presentation of virtual work

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  • SER/VE (STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment): connecting science education and urban youth, virtuallyThis workshop and poster proposal for the 2011 SUNY STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) Conference focuses primarily on: the evolution of SER/VE (the STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment), a three-dimensional, avatar-driven STEM learning environment; the rationale for the development of SER/VE; the work that has been piloted to date within high-needs K12 teaching and teacher education using SER/VE; and, the plans and needs for the further development of SER/VE. The need for SER/VE itself came from the experiences of Dr. Eileen O’Connor as a science-education faculty member within a clinically-based and largely online (the “academic” portion), alternative-certification, teacher-education program. This virtual learning environment has become an emerging focal point for her work with pre-service and in-service teachers and has the potential to bring novel and motivational, scale-able, sustainable STEM resources, materials, and experiences to K12 students in high need areas. The workshop would begin by explaining the context of SER/VE and its emergence from within Empire State College’s (ESC) Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program. Since its inception in 2004, the MAT program within ESC was chartered to bring high-qualified career-changing adults from science, engineering, mathematics, and other professions into high needs classroom. Within this teacher-education model, the faculty themselves visit and work with new teachers in their classrooms, experiencing directly the challenges faced by these teachers within high needs settings in New York State. Thus Dr. O’Connor was able to observe more than 300 classes directly, experiencing the struggles of science teachers in high needs settings. In her ongoing reflection and efforts at course and program improvements, she sought to integrate new approaches, methodologies, and e-materials into her work trying to bridge the educational and cultural gaps she had witnessed firsthand. Given her prior work experiences in applications of science and of technology (having worked in chemistry and at IBM for 15 years before entering teacher education), Eileen embraced the ways that 21st century technologies could help to strengthened her students and could create strong networks of teachers—who could thus work more effectively with their K12 students. Despite the fact that her academic instruction was largely online, she was able to network, both socially and professionally, her across-the-state K12 science teachers leading to their sharing resources, websites, projects, tutorials, and self-made YouTubes of laboratory work and of data probe science equipment. As these teachers grew in practical, inter-connected, peer-shared experiences, they in turn generated more engaging experiences for their classrooms. Progressively, Dr. O’Connor attempted to enrich, amplify, and connect an e-based learning environment – moving it beyond the limitations of classrooms and buildings – by moving into virtual learning. In 2007, she began studying how the physical sense of presence within the three-dimensional world of Second Life with her graduate science-education could improve their learning experience. The value of “place” in otherwise disembodied e-communications proved most intriguing; she published her findings at conferences and in journals. Most recently she brought this virtual experience into the K12 work directly, moving beyond simply bringing graduate students into the virtual space. In fall of 2010, after developing a primitive and private science island, she piloted a small study with middle school students and, during the summer of 2011, she brought a group of 30 urban students into this virtual space. (This work is being featured in another poster session within the conference.) Although her request for funding from the National Science Foundation to extend the development and to incorporate internal data-gathering for assessment was not granted (NSF gave good ratings to the educational concept but wanted more specific curriculum), release-time and support from ESC has allowed her to continue a more limited development of the virtual K12 environment, and thus enabled these work, noted above, with urban and middle-school students. This emerging virtual environment—SER/VE (the STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment)—has been used in an developmental, exploratory manner for the past 18-months. Presently it serves as a meeting place for K12 teachers and as a testing area for interactions with small groups of K12 students. The intention is to develop engaging, challenging, game-like but deep, STEM learning experiences for student within this environment. The initial science and technology pilot (O’Connor, 2011) proved fruitful and gave support and direction for K12 improvements; the summer work with the urban students has extended the development. More interactions with teachers and students are planned and the intended outreach to STEM professionals is continuing to progress although more slowly than if funded by NSF.Dr. O’Connor has been particularly intrepid with her forward momentum on SER/VE, thanks to the support of her dean, Dr. Robert Clougherty, and Empire State College. But she will also overview the areas that need to grow and the ways that a collective of SUNY support could help in her efforts to create a virtual, online, STEM hub that could support and enable more students to become involved in STEM careers. Much groundwork has been laid but doors still need to be opened to gain entry to K12 classrooms and to have the teaching cultures within high needs schools needs become more open to the possibilities with urban students. As under current development, a doctor will come to work with K12 students – virtually. An engineer will come to explain how buildings are now being planned through three-dimensional venues – virtually. Endlessly more STEM meetings, adventures, and research opportunities could be launched. Dr. O’Connor would welcome the brainstorming and participation of attendees to help move SER/VE and teacher education into more fruitful ways of immersing K12 urban youth in STEM areas and of segueing them into the careers of the 21st century. SER/VE could be one of these venues!This workshop and poster sessions would combine aspects of the themes of partnering and releasing.O'Connor, E. (2011). Migrating Towards K12 in Virtual Spaces: Second Life Lessons Learned as Higher Education Meets Middle School Students. In Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 (pp. 2192-2198). Chesapeake, VA: AACE. http://www.editlib.org.library.esc.edu/p/36630 Submitted by: Eileen O’Connor, Ph.D. Eileen.oconnor@esc.edu518 783-6203
  • SER/VE (STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment): connecting science education and urban youth, virtuallyThis workshop and poster proposal for the 2011 SUNY STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) Conference focuses primarily on: the evolution of SER/VE (the STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment), a three-dimensional, avatar-driven STEM learning environment; the rationale for the development of SER/VE; the work that has been piloted to date within high-needs K12 teaching and teacher education using SER/VE; and, the plans and needs for the further development of SER/VE. The need for SER/VE itself came from the experiences of Dr. Eileen O’Connor as a science-education faculty member within a clinically-based and largely online (the “academic” portion), alternative-certification, teacher-education program. This virtual learning environment has become an emerging focal point for her work with pre-service and in-service teachers and has the potential to bring novel and motivational, scale-able, sustainable STEM resources, materials, and experiences to K12 students in high need areas. The workshop would begin by explaining the context of SER/VE and its emergence from within Empire State College’s (ESC) Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program. Since its inception in 2004, the MAT program within ESC was chartered to bring high-qualified career-changing adults from science, engineering, mathematics, and other professions into high needs classroom. Within this teacher-education model, the faculty themselves visit and work with new teachers in their classrooms, experiencing directly the challenges faced by these teachers within high needs settings in New York State. Thus Dr. O’Connor was able to observe more than 300 classes directly, experiencing the struggles of science teachers in high needs settings. In her ongoing reflection and efforts at course and program improvements, she sought to integrate new approaches, methodologies, and e-materials into her work trying to bridge the educational and cultural gaps she had witnessed firsthand. Given her prior work experiences in applications of science and of technology (having worked in chemistry and at IBM for 15 years before entering teacher education), Eileen embraced the ways that 21st century technologies could help to strengthened her students and could create strong networks of teachers—who could thus work more effectively with their K12 students. Despite the fact that her academic instruction was largely online, she was able to network, both socially and professionally, her across-the-state K12 science teachers leading to their sharing resources, websites, projects, tutorials, and self-made YouTubes of laboratory work and of data probe science equipment. As these teachers grew in practical, inter-connected, peer-shared experiences, they in turn generated more engaging experiences for their classrooms. Progressively, Dr. O’Connor attempted to enrich, amplify, and connect an e-based learning environment – moving it beyond the limitations of classrooms and buildings – by moving into virtual learning. In 2007, she began studying how the physical sense of presence within the three-dimensional world of Second Life with her graduate science-education could improve their learning experience. The value of “place” in otherwise disembodied e-communications proved most intriguing; she published her findings at conferences and in journals. Most recently she brought this virtual experience into the K12 work directly, moving beyond simply bringing graduate students into the virtual space. In fall of 2010, after developing a primitive and private science island, she piloted a small study with middle school students and, during the summer of 2011, she brought a group of 30 urban students into this virtual space. (This work is being featured in another poster session within the conference.) Although her request for funding from the National Science Foundation to extend the development and to incorporate internal data-gathering for assessment was not granted (NSF gave good ratings to the educational concept but wanted more specific curriculum), release-time and support from ESC has allowed her to continue a more limited development of the virtual K12 environment, and thus enabled these work, noted above, with urban and middle-school students. This emerging virtual environment—SER/VE (the STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment)—has been used in an developmental, exploratory manner for the past 18-months. Presently it serves as a meeting place for K12 teachers and as a testing area for interactions with small groups of K12 students. The intention is to develop engaging, challenging, game-like but deep, STEM learning experiences for student within this environment. The initial science and technology pilot (O’Connor, 2011) proved fruitful and gave support and direction for K12 improvements; the summer work with the urban students has extended the development. More interactions with teachers and students are planned and the intended outreach to STEM professionals is continuing to progress although more slowly than if funded by NSF.Dr. O’Connor has been particularly intrepid with her forward momentum on SER/VE, thanks to the support of her dean, Dr. Robert Clougherty, and Empire State College. But she will also overview the areas that need to grow and the ways that a collective of SUNY support could help in her efforts to create a virtual, online, STEM hub that could support and enable more students to become involved in STEM careers. Much groundwork has been laid but doors still need to be opened to gain entry to K12 classrooms and to have the teaching cultures within high needs schools needs become more open to the possibilities with urban students. As under current development, a doctor will come to work with K12 students – virtually. An engineer will come to explain how buildings are now being planned through three-dimensional venues – virtually. Endlessly more STEM meetings, adventures, and research opportunities could be launched. Dr. O’Connor would welcome the brainstorming and participation of attendees to help move SER/VE and teacher education into more fruitful ways of immersing K12 urban youth in STEM areas and of segueing them into the careers of the 21st century. SER/VE could be one of these venues!This workshop and poster sessions would combine aspects of the themes of partnering and releasing.O'Connor, E. (2011). Migrating Towards K12 in Virtual Spaces: Second Life Lessons Learned as Higher Education Meets Middle School Students. In Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 (pp. 2192-2198). Chesapeake, VA: AACE. http://www.editlib.org.library.esc.edu/p/36630 Submitted by: Eileen O’Connor, Ph.D. Eileen.oconnor@esc.edu518 783-6203
  • this recreation of Le Mont Saint Michel off the coast of France; this recreation of Le Mont Saint Michel off the coast
  • Texting and talking
  • Transcript of "SER/VE (the STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment)"

    1. 1. SER/VE (STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment): connecting science education and urban youth, virtually Eileen O’Connor, Ph.D. Empire State College Eileen.oconnor@esc.eduNovember 4, 2011 (SUNY STEM Conference) – 2:15pm – 3:30 pm
    2. 2. Agenda: intended; many pictures• Evolution & development of SER/VE – Rationale & need – Progress within virtual spaces • Historical development within teacher education – from visits & discussion  creating “pods” • Integration of K12 directly – development, pilot, & study• Future – plans and development – Making lemonade – Getting your ideas, expertise, support, and help
    3. 3. Poll of attendees• Your STEM interests?• Your experience in K12 . . . In high needs?• Have you ever considered a virtual environment for learning STEM? – What would be in it? – Who might meet there?
    4. 4. Background of instructor, need, and project – the perfect storm• Instructor – Science Technology Engineering Math (STEM) working experiences: – a environmental chemist in government and an application, analytical chemist in industry – a technical writer, sales & marketing for IBM in areas related to in health, aerospace, government, and industry – Last 20 years in education—in chemistry, computers, education, instructional technology, and science education
    5. 5. Background of instructor, need, and project – the perfect storm• Need – from working within science and then within education the need for stronger K12 STEM instruction was evident: – Professional developer in high needs schools – Over 300 observation visits to K12 classroom• Observed, mostly: – Traditional, didactic, note-taking teaching – Little info, energy, or interest towards careers
    6. 6. Parts-and-pieces science . . . just using technology isn’t enough
    7. 7. Labs that are just about proving what is already known . . . in a very cook- book way
    8. 8. Benefits to SER/VE work• Student engagement in 21st century skills – Technology, communications, expanded connections with other K12 schools & teachers• Student creation / student direction – Students can become in building, scheduling, governance; important future skills• Students experience STEM careers & futures – Work as STEM professionals / meet STEM professionals
    9. 9. PRIMARY MOTIVATION FOR WORKING WITH VIRTUAL LEARNING• Kids learn this way• Kids are engaged, challenge, tested, and exercised this way (aka, gaming)• SO, why aren’t we using it in K12 teaching???http://www.interactivelearningsolutions.net/serve
    10. 10. Reviewing the history of workingwithin virtual environments:
    11. 11. MAT Science Center – location of many meetings & presentations
    12. 12. MAT students from across the state give virtual presentations
    13. 13. Met the Dean . . . and other professionals
    14. 14. Plus, there are many good STEMactivities already available withinvirtual spaces like Second Life, for instance . . .
    15. 15. You can participate in field trips: International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)
    16. 16. Attended class meeting using ISTE space
    17. 17. Visit virtual science: i.e.., NationalOceanographic & Atmospheric Admin. (NOAA)
    18. 18. NOAA – virtual, real-time weather Map (Northeast)
    19. 19. And, much more in education and culture
    20. 20. Best expressed through an instructional metaphor: like designing an intelligent experience (field trip / discussions / role playing / construction) . . . with an assessment Discussions / collaborations / role playing Explorations Building / More advanced - Field trips uses creating - Simulations
    21. 21. It was time to begin developing the K12 environment  SER/VE:• A private island in Second Life was secured & development begun – Jan 2010 – Oct 2010 – Mathematics, engineering, tech  was then to move to science• Based on a grant focus, moved into an applied science project – fall 2010• Attempted to work w/ K12 – security issues• K12 teachers began to design within virtual spaces -- May – July 2011• STEP program use the virtual environment – July 2011
    22. 22. During the development phase, we looked intowhat K12 students do naturally in a virtual space Communications What to DO & behavior there? Assessment
    23. 23. • From a development & fun six months with the Mall of the Universe  to SER/VE – The STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment
    24. 24. With sophisticated interiors
    25. 25. Students learned & practiced before going into the mall
    26. 26. It even had an apartment building Many engineering, math, and technology applications were evident
    27. 27. However, when moving into the pilot phase modifications were made as recommended by grant funders:• Focused only on the science – NSF suggested informal science• Began a pilot in SER/VE; with support from Empire State College & a 1/4 reassignment• Continuing with pre-service teacher development
    28. 28. The STEM Exploratory Real/Virtual Environment(SER/VE) – the main Science Center w/ the bulk of the meetings and interactions
    29. 29. First week: interest, energy . . . and confusion
    30. 30. 2. The first meeting; going over the instructions on location 1. The setting for the meetingsThe virtual interactions were clarified 3. Improving independent instruction: placing instructional & interactive materials on the island Tutorial website put4. Ongoing: making animated tutorials to onto the islandteach tech & the adventure & game concept
    31. 31. The information website was updated weekly; emails were sent too
    32. 32. An animated co-instructor helped with theweekly requirements – AKA, DaddyDarren Denver
    33. 33. Later week: now paying more attention (really),because more assessments had been embedded
    34. 34. Additional directions were built into the placards to make it easier to learn if no one was present to explain them
    35. 35. Finally, the final presentations – see the different ways for viewing & navigating
    36. 36. The students & judges were very engaged  they came forward to see better
    37. 37. What were the pilot study results?• Students were engaged & interested – Useful and interesting science research was conducted – Communication skills were enhance – Virtual interactions transpired• Areas to improve – Need to focus students on the process and interactions earlier in the project
    38. 38. Expanded the expectation for teachers –they were now to develop science meetingareas on the island New science pod area
    39. 39. New Science PodsAssignments were developed to allow science teachers tocreate “pods” with minimal knowledge of virtual building
    40. 40. Students (scienceteachers) designed richscience projects withassociated websites thatthey shared within thevirtual spaces during thesummer of 2011
    41. 41. These teacher shared their ideas about scienceprojects during meetings with other teachers . . . across NYS
    42. 42. For example, aphysics solar carpod was developed
    43. 43. Pods encouragedscience that movedout of the classroomand into the world
    44. 44. Bringing urban students into the virtual worlds, the Second Life private island – summer 2011
    45. 45. A workshop in the Science TechnologyEntry Program (STEP) helped students acquire 21st century skills Work in person, Plan / design on Collaborate, in virtual, and in paper & in 2-d share, & peer text-based social and 3-d format teach format
    46. 46. Staged development process:starts with a peer discussion to consider a game design
    47. 47. Students then began the design process on paper
    48. 48. Students select the available “shapes” for a 3-dimensional game
    49. 49. Then they use the 2-dimensionalshapes in Microsoft’s drawing program to further develop their games
    50. 50. In the afternoon, students were logged onto SER/VE, to get them comfortable in this environment
    51. 51. They begin to explore the island and find there they can build, and play
    52. 52. They tested avatar appearance and clothing
    53. 53. They mastered navigation & interactions quickly, and with enthusiasm
    54. 54. By the second afternoon, students areready for more creative uses of SER/VE
    55. 55. Creativity and boldness were evident
    56. 56. Texting on the computer; talking inreal time – learning new techniques
    57. 57. They adjusted avatars’ appearances, and moved the camera angles
    58. 58. They interpreted menus & made complex shapes
    59. 59. Some shapes became vehicles, with scripts that made them move
    60. 60. STEP students made real advance Work in person,Plan / design on Collaborate, in virtual, and inpaper & in 2-d share, & peer text-based socialand 3-d format teach format
    61. 61. Value of STEM virtual – providingexpanded access for K12 & for under-represented Meeting, • A working space that transcends geography & developing, creates a sense of reality and presence • Assembling professionals and educators sharing • Represent STEM experiences – safe, practical, Simulations & virtual experiences • Integrate with REAL and with education Enhancing • Providing expertise and experiences beyond the classroom classroom • Allowing participation outside the school day too practice
    62. 62. The challenge of getting support Master’s in Learning in Emerging MALET Technology – an incubator Graphics Grants??? SERVE – fully operational Teacher – Programming STEM
    63. 63. Eileen A. OConnor, Ph.D. (Eileen.oconnor@esc.edu )Recent Publications – Emerging technologies:O’Connor, E. A. (2011) Migrating Towards K12 in Virtual Spaces: Second Life LessonsLearned as Higher Education Meets Middle School Students. Published with the AACESociety for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference,March 2011O’Connor, E.A. (June 2010) Using Second Life (a virtual reality) in LanguageInstruction: Practical Advice on Getting Started; published with the proceedings ofthe 4th International Scientific and Methodological Conferenceon "Information and Communication Technologies in Foreign Language Teaching‖O’Connor, E. A. (2010- 2011) The effect on learning, communication, and assessmentwhen student-created YouTubes of microteaching were used in an online teacher-education course. Journal of Educational Technology Systems, 39(2), pp. 135-154.O’Connor, E. A. (2010) Practical Considerations When Using Virtual Spaces forLearning and Collaboration, with Minimal Setup and Support. A book chapterpublished in the Handbook of Research on Practices and Outcomes in Virtual Worldsand Environment, IGI Global publishers
    64. 64. Eileen A. OConnor, Ph.D. (Eileen.oconnor@esc.edu )Recent Publications – Emerging technologies:O’Connor, E. A. The Use of a Wiki in Teacher Education: How Does Learning andInstruction Change When Work Can ―Go Public‖? Published with the AACE Societyfor Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference in March2010O’Connor, E. A. (2009-2010) Instructional and Design Elements that Support EffectiveUse of Virtual Worlds: What Graduate Student Work Reveals about Second Life.Journal of Educational Technology Systems, 38(2), pp. 214 – 234.O’Connor, E. A. and Sakshaug, L. (2009) Preparing for Second Life: Two TeacherEducators Reflect on Their Initial Foray into Virtual Teaching and Learning, Journal ofEducational Technology Systems, 37(3), pp. 259-272.OConnor, E. (2008). Becoming a Virtual Instructor: How Can Higher Education FacultyPrepare for Second Life?. In G. Richards (Ed.), Proceedings of World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2008 (pp.1144-1149). Chesapeake, VA: AACE.O’Connor, E. A. (2008) Initial Study of Pre-Service Teachers’ Comments on a Reality-Based, Urban-Student Video Streamed within an Online Course, Journal ofEducational Technology Systems, 37(2), pp. 139-158.
    65. 65. Eileen A. OConnor, Ph.D. (Eileen.oconnor@esc.edu )Recent Publications – Emerging technologies:O’Connor, E. A. (2008) Moving Beyond Text Interactions: The Use of Streaming Video in Internet-BasedCourses. Published with the 3rd International Scientific and Methodological Conference on "Information andCommunication Technologies in Foreign Language Teaching‖Sakshaug, L. and O’Connor, E.A. (2008) Pedagogical, cultural and epistemological shifts: The dynamics oflearning to teach in the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) Program at SUNY Empire College – published with2009 National Conference proceedings of the National Center for Alternative Certification;http://www.teach-now.org/Sakshaug_OConnor.doc - retrieved on 7/22/09Oconnor, E. (2007). Using Reality-Based, Authentic Streamed-Videos and Online Conversations to Prepare Pre-Service Teachers for Urban Classrooms: A Pilot Study. In T. Bastiaens & S. Carliner (Eds.), Proceedings of WorldConference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2007 (pp. 1179-1184).Chesapeake, VA: AACE.O’Connor, E. A. (2007) A Case Study of the Approach to Teaching and to Technology of Three New Teachers inan Alternative Teacher Certification Program, Journal of Educational Technology Systems, 35(3), pp. 357-382.O’Connor, E. A. (2006). Encouraging community: Why, when, and how to structure online interactions tosupport collegiality and honesty. Published with the 2nd International Scientific and MethodologicalConference on "Information and Communication Technologies in Foreign Language Teaching ‖(http://distance.ffl.msu.ru/cdo/conf0606/oconnor.doc - retrieved August 2007)Presentations
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