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Economic and Workforce Trends in Entertainment 2008-2018

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The Big Picture: Economic and Workforce Trends in Entertainment 2008-2018 …

The Big Picture: Economic and Workforce Trends in Entertainment 2008-2018
Kathleen A. Milnes
President and CEO
The Entertainment Economy Institute

Published in: Education

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  • A positive balance of trade is known as a trade surplus and consists of exporting more (in financial capital terms) than one imports. A negative balance of trade is known as a trade deficit and consists of importing more than one exports. Neither is necessarily dangerous in modern economies, although large trade surpluses or trade deficits may sometimes be a sign of other economic problems.
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    • 1. The Big Picture: Economic and Workforce Trends in Entertainment Kathleen A. Milnes President and CEO The Entertainment Economy Institute
    • 2. The Entertainment Economy Institute If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will take you there.
    • 3. The Entertainment Economy Institute Entertainment Everywhere  Consumer spending on entertainment: 5.5% of household income – healthcare 5.9%  Nearly $1,000 per person per year  Domestic box office: $10.6 B  International box office: $15.8  Video/computer Games: $11.7 B  Ringtones: $5 B worldwide
    • 4. The Entertainment Economy Institute We are a national community of 2.5 million creative professionals-- costume designers to make-up artists, stuntmen to set builders, writers to actors--who work in all 50 states of our union. We are a powerful engine of economic growth that contributes nearly $80 billion annually to the U.S. economy. We are an industry overwhelmingly comprised of middle-class workers earning a living wage. We are a professional community that contributes $13 billion annually to federal and state tax coffers. We are the only American industry to run a positive balance of trade in every country in which we do business. The Motion Picture and Television Industry – Overview (Source: MPAA 2009)
    • 5. The Entertainment Economy Institute •Worldwide box office for all films reached $29.9 billion in 2009, up 7.6% over 2008’s total. • International box office ($19.3 billion) made up 64% of the worldwide total, while U.S. and Canada ($10.6 billion) made up 36%, a proportion consistent with the last several years. •U.S./Canada movie admissions, or tickets sold, reached a five year high at 1.4 billion in 2009. Admissions rose 5.5% from 2008, the first increase in two years.
    • 6. The Entertainment Economy Institute •In 2009, the number of films released in domestic theaters decreased 12%, the first decline since 2003. •Movie theaters continue to draw more people than all theme parks and major U.S. sports combined. •International box office increased 6.3% in 2009, with the largest growth (12.3%) in Asia Pacific. 81% of the Asia Pacific increase occurred in Japan and China. •The 3D market was a key growth driver –11% of 2009 box office, or $1.1 billion, came from 3D showings.
    • 7. The Entertainment Economy Institute  The national average of tickets sold per person (admissions per capita) increased to 4.3 in 2009, the first increase since 2002.  Young people from 12-24 represent about 25% of moviegoers, or more than 52 million moviegoers, and 33% of tickets sold, much larger proportions than they represent of the population (19%).  In total, moviegoers 24 years old and under buy nearly half of total movie tickets.
    • 8. The Entertainment Economy Institute •Worldwide cinema screens have remained constant over the past five years at just under 150,000 screens. More than 16,000 screens, or 11% of the total, are now digital. •The fastest growing sector of digital screens is 3D. The number of digital 3D screens worldwide more than tripled in 2009, reaching 8,989, or about 6% of screens in the world. Digital 3D represents about half (55%) of all digital screens in the world, and a higher percentage in certain regions.
    • 9. The Entertainment Economy Institute CHARACTER OF THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY  85% small business (> 10 employees)  65% freelance employees(project to project)  high degree of specialization  diversified services and vendor community  geographically concentrated  high average wage (2-3 times state average)  10-70% self employed
    • 10. The Entertainment Economy Institute Motion Picture and Television Production 2000 - 2010: California (February as Benchmark) 125 130 135 140 145 150 155 160 165 Thousands Series1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Series2 159500 156600 140200 139100 159600 146100 150700 146000 141800 136800 146800 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
    • 11. The Entertainment Economy Institute Motion Picture and Sound Recording - Los Angeles County January - December 2009 100000 105000 110000 115000 120000 125000 130000 135000 january february m arch april m ay june july august septem ber october novem ber decem ber
    • 12. The Entertainment Economy Institute Percent distribution of employment, by age group, 2008 Age group Motion picture and video industries All industries Total 100.0% 100.0% 16-19 12.8 3.8 20-24 13.4 9.4 25-34 27.5 21.6 35-44 21.4 23.0 45-54 15.6 23.8 55-64 6.8 14.3 65 and older 2.5 4.1 SOURCE: BLS Current Population Survey, 2008.
    • 13. The Entertainment Economy Institute Employment of wage and salary workers in motion picture and video industries, 2008 and projected change, 2008-2018. (Employment in thousands) Occupation Employment, 2008 Percent Change, 2008-18   Number Percent   All occupations 361.9 100.0 14.1   Management, business, and financial occupations 43.9 12.1 14.8   Top executives 12.3 3.4 3.7   Advertising, marketing, promotions, public relations, and sales managers 3.5 1.0 18.4  
    • 14. The Entertainment Economy Institute Occupation Employment, 2008 Percent Change, 2008-18Number Percent Multi-media artists and animators 8.9 2.5 29.0 Graphic designers 4.7 1.3 17.2 Actors 11.0 3.0 15.4 Producers and directors 23.7 6.5 17.2 Writers and editors 5.4 1.5 17.4 Audio and video equipment technicians 6.0 1.7 15.9 Camera operators, television, video, and motion picture 6.7 1.9 16.8 Film and video editors 12.4 3.4 16.9 Employment of wage and salary workers in motion picture and video industries, 2008 and projected change, 2008-2018. (Employment in thousands)
    • 15. The Entertainment Economy Institute Median hourly wages of the largest occupations in motion picture and video industries, May 2008 Occupation Motion picture and video industries All industries General and operations managers $51.17 $44.02 Producers and directors 41.32 30.98 Multi-media artists and animators 31.54 27.08 Actors 28.72 16.59 Film and video editors 27.00 24.31 Executive secretaries and administrative assistants 21.31 19.24 Motion picture projectionists 9.39 9.46 Cashiers 8.11 8.49 Ushers, lobby attendants, and ticket takers 7.87 8.35 Counter attendants, cafeteria, food concession, and coffee shop 7.76 8.42 SOURCE: BLS Occupational Employment Statistics, May 2008.
    • 16. The Entertainment Economy Institute Projections data from the National Employment Matrix Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Title Employment 2008 Projected Employment 2018 Change 2008-18 Number Percent Actors, producer s and directors 155,100 172,000 16,900 11 Actors 56,500 63,700 7,200 13 Producers and directors 98,600 108,300 9,700 10
    • 17. The Entertainment Economy Institute Industry Employment Hourly mean wage Annual mean wage Radio and Television Broadcasting7,050 $19.99 $41,580 Motion Picture and Video Industries6,880 $23.85 $49,610 Cable and Other Subscription Programming1,390 $28.86 $60,020 Federal Executive Branch (OES designation)470 $29.89 $62,170 Accounting, Tax Preparation, Bookkeeping, and Payroll Services450 $28.59 $59,470 Camera Operators: Industries with the highest employment
    • 18. The Entertainment Economy Institute Industry Employment Hourly mean wage Annual mean wage Motion Picture and Video Industries 12,650 $33.17 $68,980 Radio and Television Broadcasting 2,760 $22.93 $47,690 Advertising, Public Relations, and Related Services 450 $29.65 $61,670 Manufacturing and Reproducing Magnetic and Optical Media 430 $19.08 $39,690 Independent Artists, Writers, and Performers 320 $26.27 $54,650 Film and Video Editors Industries with the Highest Employment
    • 19. The Entertainment Economy Institute Occupation Employment (Nationwide) Hourly mean wage Annual mean wage Art Directors 1800 $48.93 $101,78 0 Fine Artists, Including Painters, Sculptors, and Illustrators 550 36.74 76,420 Multi-Media Artists and Animators 9050 34.57 71,910 Artists and Related Workers, All Other 520 32.51 67,630 Fashion Designers 150 43.16 89,760 Graphic Designers 4800 29.87 62,130 Set and Exhibit Designers 1470 29.84 62,070 Producers and Directors 24160 47.56 98,930 Music Directors and Composers 230 (8)- (8)- Musicians and Singers 140 37.70 (4)- Editors 3110 31.79 94,940 Writers and Authors 2340 47.51 66,130 Camera Operators, Television, Video, and Motion Picture 6880 23.85 60,600 Film and Video Editors 12650 33.17 80,870
    • 20. The Entertainment Economy Institute Industry Annual Median Wages Motion Picture and Video Industries $58,900 Advertising and Related Services $46,520 Software Publishers $58,290 Specialized Design Services $45,080 Internet Publishing and Broadcasting $48,830 Radio and Television Broadcasting $39,250 Computer Systems Design and Related Services $44,040 Cable and Other Subscription Programming $49,360 Internet Service Providers and Web Search Portals $51,310 Other Information Services $46,080 Manufacturing and Reproducing Magnetic and Optical Media $47,870 Top U. S. Industries Employing Multimedia Artists and Animators
    • 21. The Entertainment Economy Institute New Arts, Media and Entertainment Web Portal www. amecareers.org
    • 22. The Entertainment Economy Institute Thank you! Kathleen A. Milnes President and CEO Entertainment Economy Institute 15332 Antioch Street #411 Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 310-459-9177 kmilnes@entertainmentecon.org www.entertainmentecon.org www.amecareers.org Q uestions?