The power of music when Teaching English to Very Young Learners

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The power of songs and music when teaching English, as a second language, to young learners. "You don’t need to be a musical expert to share singing and dancing with children. ENTHUSIASM is the key –hang loose and enjoy the experience- children will respond whole-heartedly!” Linda Adamson.

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  • Remember : Not only music and singing songs. Chants, rhymes, rhythms, poetry, short and easy tongue twisters... As a warm up...”I’m singing in the rain”, Gene Kelly. Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmCpOKtN8ME , Just to set the melody for the Tofa, Tafa song.
  • Reflection on these sentences: You don’t need to be a musical expert to share singing and dancing with children. ENTHUSIASM is the key –hang loose and enjoy the experience- children will respond whole-heartedly!”Linda Adamson. Elicit fears, worries and problems when singing songs in English not beeing an expert.
  • WHY USE SONGS IN TEYL (according to Annie Hughes) To introduce consolidate, recycle and revise the target language Ask “one whole thing” in the new language As a memory aid To introduce rhythm, stress and intonation of English Our learners enjoy and know about songs so they are motivating To aid class dynamic To encourage physical involvement To quickly revise language from previous lesson To change the pace of a lesson As inspiration for a topic or lesson To create a fun and enjoyable environment in which to learn Because teachers like songs, rhymes and chants! Why use songs with this age group? (According to www.onestopenglish.com web site. McMillan) Children like songs Songs can be integrated into language learning - listening, singing and doing activities around the songs In many cultures songs are used to introduce or practice mother tongue with young children, so this is a medium that children are very comfortable with Songs are memorable Songs often include a lot of repetition that helps to make language memorable Songs contain chunks of language that children can remember and use Because songs must be sung at a reasonably fast speed they encourage natural phonological features like linking and weak forms Children will be actively involved in their learning, even at a very young age, rather than passive Children have energy and want to make noise. Songs will channel these natural inclinations positively Parents will enjoy hearing their children singing in English Singing is a happy and stress-free activity that will add to a positive classroom learning environment
  • Elicit from teachers more “whys”. Do not stop on the importance of music/singing when teaching English or another language. Consider music and singing a very important resource for the whole child developement and every “capacity” from the Infantil curricula: Aprendre a ser i actuar d'una manera cada vegada més autònoma. “ Music builds self esteem”, “Music skills require discipline and concentration” 2. Aprendre a pensar i a comunicar. “ Music/singing builds language skills”, “Music is emotionally fulfilling ” 3. Aprendre a descobrir i tenir iniciativa. “ Music builds listening, playing, creating, moving, singing and later on reading skills ” 4. Aprendre a conviure i habitar el món. “ Music helps build social skills” , “Music helps to develop motor skills”, “Music can help develop warm and loving relationships”
  • What songs should we choose for the classroom? (According to www.onestopenglish.com web site. McMillan) Choose songs that: Contain simple, easily understood lyrics Link with a topic or vocabulary that you are studying in class Are repetitive Children can easily do actions to (to help emphasize meaning)  CHOOSING A SONG FOR THE YL LANGUAGE CLASS… THE QUESTIONS TO ASK Is it suitable for the age group? Is it suitable for the language level of the learners? Is it suitable for the cognitive level of the learners? Does it reflect your learners’ interests? Is there an easy melody? Is there too much new language? Is it a clear recording? Do you like it?
  • “ Most of us learnt our first words in our native language sat down on our parents knees and singing a song with the help of some movements or actions. Those words were learnt in a natural and funny way without anyone being conscious of it and, what's more, our parents weren't making a point of teaching the language”. This is just to have a little idea about those rhymes parents play with little babies; the ones we probably won’t sing in the class, but you never know! Each one of the rhymes links to a You tube video to show how it works. See lyrics in the handout. Wouldn’t be funny to bring one doll or a teddy per teacher to demonstrate how these rhymes work? Idea: split the class into 5 groups and give one rhyme per group. Prepare and peform in front of the class. Can we apply some of them in the classroom? In what way?
  • Real nursery rhymes are sometimes difficult to learn because of the language. We can always adapt them or find publisher’s adaptations to traditional ones See lyrics in handout. Incy wincy spider: see links in handout Five little ducks: see folder with materials
  • Join in and sing: (Tofa, tafa), Walking through the jungle (see folder with materials) Sing and do the actions: Hockey pokey, Alice the Camel, One little elephant balancing Poetry that works: “Two little blackbirds”. Can we adapt this poem with “farmers? With “witches”? With “pumpkins” Sing about a topic: Old McDonald, or adapt “head and shoulders” Using songs as stories: I know an old lady who swallowed a fly, We’re going on a bear hunt, The wheels on the bus For pronunciation input: The food train chant
  • Join in and sing: (Tofa, tafa), Walking through the jungle (see folder with materials) Sing and do the actions: Hockey pokey, Alice the Camel, One little elephant balancing Poetry that works: “Two little blackbirds”. Can we adapt this poem with “farmers? With “witches”? With “pumpkins” Sing about a topic: Old McDonald, or adapt “head and shoulders” Using songs as stories: I know an old lady who swallowed a fly, We’re going on a bear hunt, The wheels on the bus For pronunciation input: The food train chant
  • Join in and sing: (Tofa, tafa), Walking through the jungle (see folder with materials) Sing and do the actions: Hockey pokey, Alice the Camel, One little elephant balancing Poetry that works: “Two little blackbirds”. Can we adapt this poem with “farmers? With “witches”? With “pumpkins” Sing about a topic: Old McDonald, or adapt “head and shoulders” Using songs as stories: I know an old lady who swallowed a fly, We’re going on a bear hunt, The wheels on the bus For pronunciation input: The food train chant
  • Join in and sing: (Tofa, tafa), Walking through the jungle (see folder with materials) Sing and do the actions: Hockey pokey, Alice the Camel, One little elephant balancing Poetry that works: “Two little blackbirds”. Can we adapt this poem with “farmers? With “witches”? With “pumpkins” Sing about a topic: Old McDonald, or adapt “head and shoulders” Using songs as stories: I know an old lady who swallowed a fly, We’re going on a bear hunt, The wheels on the bus For pronunciation input: The food train chant
  • Join in and sing: (Tofa, tafa), Walking through the jungle (see folder with materials) Sing and do the actions: Hockey pokey, Alice the Camel, One little elephant balancing Poetry that works: “Two little blackbirds”. Can we adapt this poem with “farmers? With “witches”? With “pumpkins” Sing about a topic: Old McDonald, or adapt “head and shoulders” Using songs as stories: I know an old lady who swallowed a fly, We’re going on a bear hunt, The wheels on the bus. Five little monkeys jumping on the bed For pronunciation input: The food train chant, Apples and bananas
  • Join in and sing: (Tofa, tafa), Walking through the jungle (see folder with materials) Sing and do the actions: Hockey pokey, Alice the Camel, One little elephant balancing Poetry that works: “Two little blackbirds”. Can we adapt this poem with “farmers? With “witches”? With “pumpkins” Sing about a topic: Old McDonald, or adapt “head and shoulders” Using songs as stories: I know an old lady who swallowed a fly, We’re going on a bear hunt, The wheels on the bus For pronunciation input: The food train chant
  • You Tube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gVZ-Xrx4qY&feature=related: “The lion sleeps tonight” You tube channels: http://www.youtube.com/user/1stnurseryrhymes#p/u : “1st Nursery rhymes channel” http://www.youtube.com/user/SuperSimpleSongs#p/c/028565C616627F50 : Super simple songs channel” http://www.youtube.com/user/jamarookids : “Jamaroo kids channel” Songs for children on line http://www.bbc.co.uk/cbeebies/somethingspecial/songs/oldmacdonald/ : “Bbc web page for young children” http://www.supersimplesongs.com : “Super simple songs web page” http://www.britishcouncil.org/kids-songs-seasons.htm : “British Council web page”
  • Round up and sing a song agreed with teachers. You can sing from a karaoke on line : http://www.karaokeparty.com/en/
  • See handout: Links, web pages, bibliography...
  • The power of music when Teaching English to Very Young Learners

    1. 1. The Power of Music. Teaching English to Very Young Children
    2. 2. <ul><li>“ You don’t need to be a musical expert to share singing and dancing with children” </li></ul><ul><li>“ ENTHUSIASM is the key –hang loose and enjoy the experience- children will respond whole-heartedly!” </li></ul><ul><li>Linda Adamson </li></ul>
    3. 3. The power of music 1/2 <ul><li>Music truly is one of chilhoods’s most rewarding experiences. Here’s why: </li></ul><ul><li>Music is FUN! </li></ul><ul><li>Music/singing builds language skills: vocabulary, structures,... </li></ul><ul><li>Music builds self esteem </li></ul><ul><li>Music helps to develop motor skills </li></ul><ul><li>Music builds listening, playing, creating, moving, singing and later on reading skills </li></ul>
    4. 4. The power of music 2/2 <ul><li>Music skills require discipline and concentration </li></ul><ul><li>Music can help develop warm and loving relationships (songs can be soothing, humorous, interactive) </li></ul><ul><li>Music helps build social skills </li></ul><ul><li>Musical concepts such as volume; tempo; beat and rhythm; pitch and melody; harmony and mood; and tone can be learnt. </li></ul><ul><li>Music is emotionally fulfilling </li></ul><ul><li>MUSIC HELPS TO LEARN A NEW LANGUAGE </li></ul>
    5. 5. What songs should we choose for the classroom? <ul><li>The question to ask </li></ul>
    6. 6. Start from the beginning… <ul><li>Knee-Jogging rhymes : </li></ul><ul><li>Trot, trot or This is the way the ladies ride </li></ul><ul><li>Bouncing and Dancing Rhymes : </li></ul><ul><li>Dance, little Baby </li></ul><ul><li>Patting and Clapping Rhymes : </li></ul><ul><li>Shoe a little horse </li></ul><ul><li>Lullabies and Rocking Rhymes : </li></ul><ul><li>Bye baby bunting </li></ul><ul><li>Finger play Rhymes : </li></ul><ul><li>Round and round the garden, </li></ul><ul><li>Slowly, Slowly </li></ul>
    7. 7. Some steps beyond... <ul><li>Nursery Rhymes: </li></ul><ul><li>The Muffin Man </li></ul><ul><li>Little Jack Horner </li></ul><ul><li>Once I caught a fish alive </li></ul><ul><li>Incy wincy spider </li></ul><ul><li>Five little ducks </li></ul><ul><li>... </li></ul>
    8. 8. And a bit of everything... Some activities to carry out with songs <ul><li>1. Join in and sing: </li></ul><ul><li>Walking through the jungle </li></ul>
    9. 9. And a bit of everything... Some activities to carry out with songs <ul><li>2. Sing and do the actions: </li></ul><ul><li>Alice the camel </li></ul>
    10. 10. And a bit of everything... Some activities to carry out with songs <ul><li>3. Poetry that works: </li></ul><ul><li>Two little blackbirds </li></ul>
    11. 11. And a bit of everything... Some activities to carry out with songs <ul><li>4. Sing about a topic: </li></ul><ul><li>“ Animal boogie” </li></ul>
    12. 12. And a bit of everything... Some activities to carry out with songs <ul><li>5. Using songs as stories: </li></ul><ul><li>I know an old lady who swallowed a fly </li></ul>
    13. 13. And a bit of everything... Some activities to carry out with songs <ul><li>6. For pronunciation input: </li></ul><ul><li>The food train chant </li></ul>
    14. 14. Tools for singing <ul><li>You Tube </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gVZ-Xrx4qY&feature=related </li></ul><ul><li>some You tube channels: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/user/1stnurseryrhymes#p/u </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/user/SuperSimpleSongs#p/c/028565C616627F50 </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/user/jamarookids </li></ul><ul><li>... </li></ul><ul><li>Songs for children on line http://www.bbc.co.uk/cbeebies/somethingspecial/songs/oldmacdonald/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.supersimplesongs.com </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.britishcouncil.org/kids-songs-seasons.htm </li></ul>
    15. 15. <ul><li>“ Singing fills my heart </li></ul><ul><li>with warmth and laughter. </li></ul><ul><li>May your lives be filled </li></ul><ul><li>with songs ALWAYS! ” </li></ul><ul><li>Linda Adamson </li></ul>
    16. 16. http://delicious.com/enriccalvet/songs

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