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  • --Outreach and Engagement: Meets immediate and basic needs for food, clothing, and shelter. Nonthreatening, flexible approach to engage and connect people to services. --Housing with Appropriate Supports Options from Safe Havens to transitional and permanent supportive housing. Combines affordable, independent housing with flexible, supportive services. --Multidisciplinary Treatment Teams/Intensive Case Management Provides or arranges for an clinical, housing, and other rehabilitation needs. Features low caseloads (10-15:1) and 24-hour service availability. --Integrated Treatment for Co-occurring Disorders Coordinated clinical treatment of both mental illnesses and substance use. Reduces AODA, homelessness, and the severity of mental health problems. --Motivational Interventions/Stages of Change Helps prepare individuals for active treatment; incorporates relapse prevention strategies. Must be matched to an individual’s stage of recovery.

Path Path Presentation Transcript

  • PATH—Projects to Assist in the Transition From Homelessness Surviving Homlessness: Vicki -- Homeless Survivor Brad Munger – Previous PATH Provide In Rock County First Unitarian Society
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness U.S. Capitol
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness White House
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness Supreme Court
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness In the land of abundance . . .
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness Many citizens are trapped in homelessness . . .
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness . . . But not in our community . . . Everyone has someplace to stay . . . It might not be posh, but even the worst accommodations are adequate . . .
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness For example, consider the following dwelling place with it’s grand entrance . . .
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness The Foyer
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness Wright-Style Organic Architecture
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness Turtle Flats: 8-Unit Apartments
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness Classic Stone Flooring Throughout
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness All Natural Carpeting
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness Running Water . . . sometimes
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness The Living Room
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness Fireside Chat at the Hearth
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness The Study
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness The Kitchen
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness Efficiency w/Fridge
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness Mason Room—Art’s Bunk . . . Word on the street is that he hanged himself
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness Deluxe Efficiency!
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness Stone Toilet
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness Turtle Flats--The “Bunk”
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness Human Cold Storage
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness Airy Bedroom
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness “ Bunk”er Under the Recruiting Station
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness Cold Feet
  • PATH: Projects to Assist in the Transition from Homelessness Frozen Feet
  • Serving People Who are Mentally Ill and Homeless
    • Mental illness accounts for more disease burden in the United States than cancer and is just edged out by cardio-vascular disease.
    • 5.4% of the US population suffer from a major mental illness.
    • 2.6% of the US citizens suffer from a severe and persistent mental illness.
    • 0.5% of the US population receive Social Security Benefits for mental health reasons.
    • Schizophrenia is more prevalent than epilepsy (1.3%)
    • Nearly a third of all homeless people are estimated to have a severe and persistent mental illness.
    • 5% are homeless at any given time.
    • Half of homeless have a substance use issue.
    • 16% of jail populations are mentally ill--20% of prisons.
  • Serving People Who are Mentally Ill and Homeless System-Level Values (and last but not least)
  • Serving People Who are Mentally Ill and Homeless
    • Chapter 2: The Population: Understanding the characteristics of people with serious mental illnesses and/or co-occurring substance use disorders who become homeless, and the barriers they face to residential stability and sobriety.
    • Person-Related Risk Factors:
    • Acute symptoms of illness (largely “ positive” symptoms such as: paranoia, anxiety, hallucinations, formal thought disorder, depression, etc.).
    • Residual symptoms (such as asociability, poor hygiene and apartment upkeep, inability to budget money, isolation, amotivation, sleep disturbance, dependency, impaired practical judgment, etc.).
  • Serving People Who are Mentally Ill and Homeless
    • Chapter 2: Population: Understanding people with serious mental illnesses and the barriers they face to residential stability and sobriety.
    • Complicating Factors:
    • Unpredictable nature of mental illnesses with waxing and waning of symptoms.
    • Substance abuse.
    • Victimization to physical or sexual abuse is correlated with homelessness, particularly if perpetrated by a family member.
    • Sexual abuse trauma in is found to be highly prevalent among homeless women.
  • Serving People Who are Mentally Ill and Homeless
    • Chapter 2: Population: Understanding people with serious mental illnesses and the barriers they face to residential stability and sobriety.
    • Environmental Risk Factors:
    • Discharge plans at hospitals & jails being inadequate.
    • Community support services lacking.
    • Inattention to consumer preferences , especially involving autonomy and privacy.
    • Lack of affordable housing.
    • Insufficient disability benefits: Nationwide 80% of one’s SSI check is required to get a one-bedroom in 1990
    • Lack of coordination between mental health and substance abuse systems.
  • Serving People Who are Mentally Ill and Homeless Person-Centered Values
    • Choic e --giving real choices!
    • Voice --’Nothing about us without us!”
    • Empowermen t --e ducated and empowered to make choices right down to setting goals in their treatment plan!
    • Dignity and Respec t --and person-first language!
    • Hop e -- recovery of hope is essential for recovery from any illness!
  • Serving People Who are Mentally Ill and Homeless System-Level Values
    • Believe in Recover y --prosthetic hope and optimism essential!
    • “ Any Door is the Right Door”-- homeless rarely show up at the door.
    • Mainstream Resources Preferred the only real long-term solution.
    • Be Flexible & Offer Low-Demand Services --safety and survival are priority.
    • Tailor Services to Individual Needs --strengths, preferences, needs, and personal motivations.
  • Serving People Who are Mentally Ill and Homeless System-Level Values (continued)
    • Develop Culturally Competent Services --Race, ethnicity, and culture influence everything. Providers should be multicultural and multilingual.
    • Involve Consumers and Recovering Persons -- valuable contributions as agency staff and as active members of planning councils and advisory boards.
    “ Hey, there’s that hybrid again! Man, check out the mileage! And ‘super-ultra low emissions’! Let’s save the world together!”
  • Serving People Who are Mentally Ill and Homeless: Essential Services-- Evidence Based
    • Outreach and Engagement:
    • Meets immediate and basic needs for food, clothing, and shelter.
    • Non-threatening, flexible approach to engage and connect people to services.
    • Housing with Appropriate Supports
    • Options from Safe Havens to transitional and permanent supportive housing.
    • Combines affordable, independent housing with flexible, supportive services.
    • Multidisciplinary Treatment Teams/Intensive Case Management
    • Provides or arranges for an clinical, housing, and other rehabilitation needs.
    • Features low caseloads (8:1) and 24-hour service availability.
    • Integrated Treatment for Co-occurring Disorders
    • Coordinated clinical treatment of both mental illnesses and substance use.
    • Reduces AODA, homelessness, and the severity of mental health problems.
    • Motivational Interventions/Stages of Change
    • Helps prepare individuals for active treatment; incorporates relapse prevention strategies.
    • Must be matched to an individual’s stage of recovery.
  • Serving People Who are Mentally Ill and Homeless: Essential Services-- Evidence Based (continued)
    • Modified Therapeutic Communities
    • Views the community as the therapeutic method for recovery from substance use.
    • Have been successfully adapted for people who are homeless and people with co-occurring disorders.
    • Self-Help Programs
    • Often includes the 12-step method, with a focus on personal responsibility.
    • May provide an important source of support for people who are homeless.
    • Involvement of Consumers and Recovering Persons
    • Can serve as positive role models, help reduce stigma, and make good team members.
    • Should be actively involved in the planning and delivery of services.
    • Prevention Services
    • Reduces risk factors and enhance protective factors.
    • Includes supportive services in housing, discharge planning, and additional support during transition periods.
  • Serving People Who are Mentally Ill and Homeless: Other Essential Services
    • Primary Health Care: Includes outreach and case management to provide access to a range of comprehensive health services.
    • Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment: Provides access to a full range of outpatient and inpatient services (e.g., counseling, detox, self-help/peer support).
    • Psychosocial Rehabilitation: Helps individuals recover functioning and integrate or re-integrate into their communities.
    • Income Support and Entitlement Assistance: Outreach and case management to help people obtain, maintain, and manage their benefits.
    • Employment, Education, and Training: Requires assessment, case management, housing, supportive services, job training and placement, and follow-up.
    • Services for Women: Programs focus on women’s specific needs, e.g., trauma, childcare, parenting, ongoing domestic violence, etc.
    Gr “ Yeah, but how do you get a haircut without any income!”
  • Serving People Who are Mentally Ill and Homeless: Other Essential Services (continued)
    • Low-Demand Services: Helps engage individuals who initially are unwilling or unable to engage in more formal treatment.
    • Crisis Care: Responds quickly with services needed to avoid hospitalization and homelessness.
    • Family Self-Help/Advocacy: Helps families cope with family members’ illnesses and addictions to prevent homelessness.
    • Cultural Competence: Accepts differences, recognizes strengths, and respects choices through culturally adapted services.
    • Criminal Justice System Initiatives: Features diversion, treatment, and re-entry strategies to help people remain in or re-enter the community.
  • Serving People Who are Mentally Ill and Homeless Quality of Life! Tallest Peace Pole in the World Vicki’s Apartment!