3 хирами

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  • Briefly share our successes
  • You can see the fire is backing into the wind, as we planned it.
  • Foundation behind why cross boundary relationship is effective. September 1970 – Severe fires in California. Many local, state and federal agencies responded but we had many problems (coordination, communication, and terminology) .
  • Adopted as the international standard at the 3 rd International Wildland Fire Conference in Sydney, Australia in 2003.
  • Briefly share our successes and seek your thoughts on our future work.
  • 3 хирами

    1. 1. U.S. Forest Service Fire and Aviation Management Cross Boundary Fires U.S. and Canada Patti Hirami Director, Eastern Region Fire and Aviation Management
    2. 2.
    3. 3. Common Elements for Cross Boundary Fire Fighting <ul><li>Agreements for Initial and Extended fire firefighting </li></ul><ul><li>Share ground and aviation resources </li></ul><ul><li>Joint Training </li></ul><ul><li>Border crossing issues </li></ul>
    4. 4. US/Canada Elements of Success <ul><li>Similar land objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Prescribed fire as a vegetation management tool </li></ul><ul><li>Incident Command System </li></ul>
    5. 5. Superior National Forest/Province of Ontario
    6. 6.
    7. 7.
    8. 8.
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    10. 10. Fire Behavior under Planned Conditions
    11. 11. <ul><li>National Interagency Incident Management System </li></ul>
    12. 12. <ul><li>Flexible for incidents of any kind and size. </li></ul><ul><li>Agencies use the same system on normal situations as well as major emergencies. </li></ul><ul><li>Must be sufficiently standard to allow personnel from a variety of agencies and diverse geographic locations to rapidly meld into a common management structure. </li></ul><ul><li>The system must be cost effective. </li></ul>
    13. 13. <ul><li>Incident Management </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Incident Command System (ICS) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unified Command </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Training </li></ul><ul><li>Qualifications and Certifications </li></ul><ul><li>Publication Management </li></ul><ul><li>Supporting Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Multi-Agency Coordination System </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MACS and MAC Groups </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>1985 - NIMS/ICS adopted by all federal, state and local wildland fire agencies. </li></ul><ul><li>2001 – Terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon </li></ul><ul><li>2003 – Presidential mandate that ICS to be used nationally for management of all hazards </li></ul><ul><li>2004 – Development of the National Incident Management System ( NIMS) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>NIMS is based upon the Wildland Fire Community National Interagency Incident Management System ( NIIMS). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Revised in 2008. </li></ul>
    15. 15. <ul><li>ICS was adopted by the International Wildland Fire Summit in 2005. </li></ul><ul><li>United States </li></ul><ul><li>Canada </li></ul><ul><li>Australia </li></ul><ul><li>New Zealand </li></ul><ul><li>United Arab Emirates </li></ul><ul><li>Mexico </li></ul><ul><li>South Africa (for wildland fire) </li></ul><ul><li>India (in transition) </li></ul><ul><li>Sri Lanka (in transition) </li></ul><ul><li>Philippines (in transition) </li></ul><ul><li>Indonesia (in transition) </li></ul><ul><li>ASEAN (in transition) </li></ul>
    16. 16. U.S. Forest Service/Canada Relationship Continues to Grow <ul><li>Lessons learned </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Training is very important after quiet seasons. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scientists are needed for new information and applications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strive to improve </li></ul></ul>

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