THREE STEPS TOWARDS GLOBAL DISASTER RESILIENCE in 2014

1,743 views

Published on

THREE STEPS TOWARDS GLOBAL DISASTER RESILIENCE in 2014. Continuation of a renewed emphasis on promoting our 2014 paradigm of global disaster resilience.
Step 1: Integrating Today’s Global Knowledge Into Global Books of Knowledge
Step 2: From Today’s Books of Knowledge to Innovative Capacity Building
Step 3: From Today’s Paradigm to Tomorrow’s
Presentation courtesy of Dr. Walter Hays, Global Alliance for Disaster Reduction

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,743
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
312
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
87
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

THREE STEPS TOWARDS GLOBAL DISASTER RESILIENCE in 2014

  1. 1. GLOBAL DISASTER RISKS THAT BECOME ECONOMIC LOSSES
  2. 2. GLOBAL DISASTER RESILIENCE The Paradigm for 2014 That Makes Our Tomorrows Better STEP 1
  3. 3. TOWARDS GLOBAL DISASTER RESILIENCE • Step 1: Integrating Today’s Global Knowledge Into Global Books of Knowledge • Step 2: From Today’s Books of Knowledge to Innovative Capacity Building • Step 3: From Today’s Paradigm to Tomorrow’s
  4. 4. LACK OF EARTHQUAKE RESILIENCE HAS RESULTED IN DEATHS REACHING HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS ECONOMIC LOSSES REACHING HUNDREDS OF BILLIONS
  5. 5. STEP 1 Integrating Today’s Global Knowledge Into Global Books of Knowledge
  6. 6. WHAT DO WE KNOW? • Floods, hurricanes, tropical storms, typhoons, cyclones, tornadoes, nor'easters, earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, wildfires, and landslides will recur during 2014 and ad infinitum.
  7. 7. GLOBAL NATURAL HAZARDS • FLOODS • SEVERE WINDSTORMS • EARTHQUAKES • TSUNAMIS • DROUGHTS • VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS • LANDSLIDES • WILDFIRES
  8. 8. GLOBAL DISASTER RISKS THAT BECOME ECONOMIC LOSSES
  9. 9. WHAT DO WE KNOW? • All natural hazards test the disaster resilience of our governments, our institutions, and our communities.
  10. 10. LIVING WITH NATURAL HAZARDS NO DISASTERS: DEMANDS ON COMMUNITY CAPABILITIES OF COMMUNITY
  11. 11. WHAT DO WE KNOW? • Some natural hazards will cause a disaster.
  12. 12. LIVING WITH NATURAL HAZARDS A DISASTER: INSUFFICIENT CAPABILITIES OF COMMUNITY INCREASED DEMANDS ON COMMUNITY
  13. 13. EVERY TIME A DISASTER OCCURS, WE HAVE NEW KNOWLEDGE TO ADD TO THE “GLOBAL BOOKS OF KNOWLEDGE”
  14. 14. ICELAND’S HAZARDS • VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS
  15. 15. EUROPE’S HAZARDS • • • • • • EARTHQUAKES FLOODS DROUGHTS LANDSLIDES TSUNAMIS VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS • WILDFIRES
  16. 16. MEDITERRANEAN REGION’S HAZARDS • • • • • • EARTHQUAKES FLOODS DROUGHTS LANDSLIDES TSUNAMIS VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS • WILDFIRES
  17. 17. EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN REGION’S HAZARDS • • • • • EARTHQUAKES FLOODS DROUGHTS LANDSLIDES TSUNAMIS
  18. 18. EUROPE’S HAZARDS: TURKEY • • • • • EARTHQUAKES TSUNAMIS FLOODS DROUGHTS LANDSLIDES
  19. 19. EUROPE’S HAZARDS: IRAN • • • • • FLOODS EARTHQUAKES DUST STORMS LANDSLIDES DROUGHTS
  20. 20. AFRICA’S HAZARDS: NORTHERN AFRICA • • • • FLOODS EARTHQUAKES DUST STORMS DROUGHTS
  21. 21. AFRICA’S HAZARDS: SUBSAHARA • FLOODS • DROUGHTS • VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS • DESERTIFICATION
  22. 22. AFRICA’S HAZARDS: EGYPT • • • • • FLOODS EARTHQUAKES DUST STORMS DROUGHTS DESERTIFICATION
  23. 23. ASIA’S HAZARDS: JAPAN • • • • • • • FLOODS EARTHQUAKES TSUNAMIS TYPHOONS VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS LANDSLIDES DROUGHTS
  24. 24. ASIA’S HAZARDS: INDIA • • • • • FLOODS EARTHQUAKES CYCLONES LANDSLIDES DROUGHTS
  25. 25. ASIA’S HAZARDS: CHINA • • • • • • • FLOODS EARTHQUAKES TYPHOONS ERUPTIONS LANDSLIDES DROUGHTS ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
  26. 26. EUROPE/ASIA’S HAZARDS: RUSSIA • • • • • • • FLOODS EARTHQUAKES WINDSTORMS VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS WILDFIRES LANDSLIDES DROUGHTS
  27. 27. PACIFIC RING OF FIRE HAZARDS • SEVERE WINDSTORMS • FLOODS • EARTHQUAKES • TSUNAMIS • VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS
  28. 28. PACIFIC RING OF FIRE HAZARDS: THE PHILIPPINES • • • • • FLOODS TYPHOONS EARTHQUAKES TSUNAMIS VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS • LANDSLIDES
  29. 29. INDIAN OCEAN’S HAZARDS • SEVERE WINDSTORMS • FLOODS • EARTHQUAKES • TSUNAMIS • VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS
  30. 30. NORTH AMERICA’S HAZARDS • • • • • • FLOODS HURRICANES EARTHQUAKES TORNADOES WILDFIRES VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS • LANDSLIDES
  31. 31. UNITED STATE’S HAZARDS • • • • • • FLOODS HURRICANES EARTHQUAKES TORNADOES WILDFIRES VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS • LANDSLIDES
  32. 32. CANADA’S HAZARDS • • • • • FLOODS HURRICANES EARTHQUAKES LANDSLIDES WINTER STORMS
  33. 33. MEXICO’S HAZARDS • • • • FLOODS HURRICANES EARTHQUAKES VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS • LANDSLIDES
  34. 34. LATIN AMERICA/CARIBBEAN’S HAZARDS • • • • • • HURRICANES EARTHQUAKES TSUNAMIS FLOODS LANDSLIDES VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS • ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
  35. 35. THE CARIBBEAN’S HAZARDS • • • • • • HURRICANES EARTHQUAKES TSUNAMIS FLOODS LANDSLIDES VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS
  36. 36. SOUTH AMERICA’S HAZARDS • • • • • EARTHQUAKES TSUNAMIS FLOODS LANDSLIDES VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS
  37. 37. SOUTH AMERICA’S HAZARDS: PERU • • • • • EARTHQUAKES TSUNAMIS FLOODS LANDSLIDES VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS
  38. 38. SOUTH AMERICA’S HAZARDS: CHILE • • • • • EARTHQUAKES TSUNAMIS FLOODS LANDSLIDES VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS • WILDFIRES
  39. 39. NEW ZEALAND’S HAZARDS • EARTHQUAKES • FLOODS • LANDSLIDES
  40. 40. AUSTRALIA’S HAZARDS • • • • CYCLONES EARTHQUAKES FLOODS WILDFIRES
  41. 41. •MONITORING •HAZARD MAPS •INVENTORY •VULNERABILITY •LOCATIONR ACCEPTABLE RISK RISK UNACCEPTABLE RISK BOOKS OF KNOWLEDGE DATA BASES AND INFORMATION YOUR COUNTRY POLICIES FOR DISASTER RESILIENCE HAZARDS: GROUND SHAKING GROUND FAILURE SURFACE FAULTING TECTONIC DEFORMATION TSUNAMI RUN UP AFTERSHOCKS •EDUCATION •PREPAREDNESS •PROTECTION •EARLY WARNING •EM RESPONSE •RECOVERY
  42. 42. BOOKS OF KNOWLEDGE ARE TOOLS TO FACILITATE A COUNTRY’S MOVEMENT TOWARDS DISASTER RESILIENCE
  43. 43. THE PROCESS RISK ASSESSMENT • VULNERABILITY • COST • EXPOSURE NATURAL HAZARDS • EVENT EXPECTED LOSS • BENEFIT •CONSEQUENCES POLICY ASSESSMENT POLICY ADOPTION
  44. 44. Flooding occurs when the local river channels, floodplains, wetlands, and water tables are not able to contain, store, or transmit local precipitation and runoff.
  45. 45. CAUSES OF RISK BUILDING IN FLOOD PLAIN INUNDATION INTERACTION WITH HAZARDOUS MATERIALS FLOODS CASE HISTORIES EFFECTS OF WATER ON STRUCTURE & CONTENTS INCREASED POTENTIAL FOR HEALTH PROBLEMS, DEATH AND INJURY LOSS FUNCTION OF INFRASTRUCTURE VULNERABILITY OF NONSTRUCTURAL ELEMENTS
  46. 46. BOOK OF KNOWLEDE SEVERE WINDSTORMS
  47. 47. CAUSES OF RISK WIND AND WATER INSIDE BUILDING ENVELOPE UPLIFT OF ROOF SYSTEM FLYING DEBRIS SEVERE WINDSTORMS CASE HISTORIES UNDERESTIMATING WIND SPEEDS AND STORM SURGE FLOODING FROM STORM SURGE AND RAIN QUALITY OF WORKMANSHIP IGNORING NON-STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS
  48. 48. CAUSES OF RISK INADEQUATE RESISTANCE TO HORIZONTAL GROUND SHAKING SOIL AMPLIFICATION PERMANENT DISPLACEMENT (SURFACE FAULTING & GROUND FAILURE) EARTHQUAKES IRREGULARITIES IN ELEVATION AND PLAN CASE HISTORIES TSUNAMI WAVE RUNUP LACK OF DETAILING AND CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS INATTENTION TO NONSTRUCTURAL ELEMENTS
  49. 49. • BUILDINGS UNABLE TO WITHSTAND LATERAL GROUND SHAKING • LIFELINE SYSTEMS UNABLE TO WITHSTAND PERMANENT DISPLACEMENT ASSOCIATED WITH FAULT RUPTURE, LANDSLIDES, AND LIQUEFACTION
  50. 50. BOOK OF KNOWLEDGE TSUNAMIS
  51. 51. CAUSES OF RISK HIGH VELOCITY OF INCOMING WAVES DISTANCE OF WAVE RUNUP AND RUNOFF VERTICAL HEIGHT OF WAVE RUNUP TSUNAMIS CASE HISTORIES INADEQUATE RESISTANCE OF BUILDINGS FLOODING INADEQUATE WARNING SYSTEMS PROXIMITY TO SOURCE OF TSUNAMI
  52. 52. BOOK OF KNOWLEDGE VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS
  53. 53. CAUSES OF RISK PROXIMITY TO LATERAL BLAST IN PATH OF PYROCLASTIC FLOWS IN PATH OF FLYING DEBRIS (TEPHRA) VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS CASE HISTORIES IN PATH OF VOLCANIC PLUME AND ASH (AVIATION) IN PATH OF LAVA FLOWS IN PATH OF LAHARS INADEQUATE WARNING ANO EVACUATION
  54. 54. CAUSES OF RISK BUILDING ON UNSTABLE SLOPES SOIL AND ROCK SUCEPTIBLE TO FALLS SOIL AND ROCK SUCEPTIBLE TO TOPPLES LANDSLIDES SOIL AND ROCK SUCEPTIBLE TO SPREADS CASE HISTORIES SOIL AND ROCK SUSCEPTIBLE TO FLOWS EXCESSIVE PRECIPITATION OR GROUND SHAKING BARE, OVERSTEEPENED SLOPES
  55. 55. BOOK OF KNOWLEDGE WILDFIRES
  56. 56. CAUSES OF RISK LIGHTNING MANMADE FIRES PROXIMITY OF URBANWILDLANDS INTERFACE WILDFIRES CASE HISTORIES WIND SPEED AND DIRECTION CUTTING FORESTS DENUDED SLOPES HOT, DRY WEATHER
  57. 57. CAUSES OF RISK PROLONGED LACK OF PRECIPITATION LOSS OF SOIL MOSTURE LOSS OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTIVITY DROUGHTS CASE HISTORIES DEPLETION/POLLUTION OF GROUND WATER LOSS OF VEGETATION INSECT INFESTATION PROGRESSIVE LOSS OF LAND BY DESERTIFICATION
  58. 58. STEP 2 From Today’s Books of Knowledge to Innovative Capacity Building Go to next file

×