Part 5: Recovery The Five Pillars Of Disaster Resilience

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WHAT IS RECOVERY, THE FIFTH PILLAR? Recovery is A period of up to ten years marked by an all out effort to restore essential services to normal, to repair and reconstruct damaged buildings and infrastructure, and to revive the economy. IT IS AN INTENSE PERIOD: Up to 10 years are required to plan, fund, and implement the kinds of multi-faceted restoration, repair, and reconstruction activities that are needed to restore life in the community to normal again.

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Part 5: Recovery The Five Pillars Of Disaster Resilience

  1. 1. THE FIVE PILLARS OF DISASTER RESILIENCE Part 5: Recovery
  2. 2. •MONITORING •HAZARD MAPS •INVENTORY •VULNERABILITY •LOCATIONR DATA BASES AND INFORMATION ACCEPTABLE RISK RISK UNACCEPTABLE RISK YOUR BOOKS OF KNOWLEDGE NATION 5 PILLARS OF DISASTER RESILIENCE HAZARDS: GROUND SHAKING GROUND FAILURE SURFACE FAULTING TECTONIC DEFORMATION TSUNAMI RUN UP AFTERSHOCKS •PREPAREDNESS •PROTECTION •EARLY WARNING •EM RESPONSE •RECOVERY
  3. 3. DISASTER RESILIENCE IS A FAILED POLICY WITHOUT THE ADOPTION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF FIVE INTEGRATED POLICIES (i.e., The Five Pillars of Disaster Resilience)
  4. 4. WHAT IS PREPAREDNESS, THE FIRST PILLAR? (Preparedness is a state of readiness on individual, urban, sub-regional, and national scales that is sufficient to keep the disaster agents of a natural hazard from causing a disaster
  5. 5. WHAT IS PROTECTION, THE SECOND PILLAR? Protection is a mandated state of robustness and strength for important buildings and essential - critical infrastructure to prevent loss of function when a natural hazard ocurs
  6. 6. WHAT IS EARLY WARNING, THE THIRD PILLAR? Early Warning is a state of monitoring and messaging “in the moment” that activates evacuation plans to save lives and accelerates site-specific preparedness to protect property
  7. 7. WHAT IS EMERGENCY RESPONSE, THE FOURTH PILLAR? Emergency Response is a myriad of scripted and unscripted heroic and historic responses during a twenty-four hour and twenty-one day “race against time” to save lives and protect property
  8. 8. WHAT IS RECOVERY, THE FIFTH PILLAR? Recovery is A period of up to ten years marked by an all out effort to restore essential services to normal, to repair and reconstruct damaged buildings and infrastructure, and to revive the economy
  9. 9. KEY ELEMENTS OF RECOVERY • IT IS AN INTENSE PERIOD: Up to 10 years are required to plan, fund, and implement the kinds of multi-faceted restoration, repair, and reconstruction activities that are needed to restore life in the community to normal again.
  10. 10. KEY ELEMENTS OF RECOVERY • PUBLIC PRESSURE: The political priority is to meet the urgent needs of the people IMMEDIATELY, but the default position is AS QUICKLY AS POSSIBLE.
  11. 11. KEY ELEMENTS OF RECOVERY • SELF INSURANCE AND CASUALTY INSURANCE: When available, money from loss indemnification casualty insurance helps to start the repair and reconstruction quickly. • LIMITS OF PROTECTION: Insured buildings and infrastructure are usually USUALLY restored to the pre-event level of protection; SOMETIMES MORE.
  12. 12. KEY ELEMENTS OF RECOVERY • INTERNATIONAL ASSISTANCE: Available in many cases, but not all cases. • POLICY CHANGES: Public officials use the recovery period as a “Window of Opportunity” to adopt and implement new policies based on the lessons on preparedness, protection, early warning, and emergency response learned from the event.
  13. 13. THE GOAL DISASTER RESILIENCE: DEMANDS ON COMMUNITY CAPABILITIES OF COMMUNITY
  14. 14. REALITY LACK OF DISASTER RESILIENCE UNANTICIPATED DEMANDS ON COMMUNITY INSUFFICIENT CAPACITY FOR RECOVERY AFTER A NATURAL HAZARD STRIKES
  15. 15. ANY COMMUNITY CAN INCREASE ITS CAPABILITY FOR COSTEFFECTIVE RECOVERY DURING THE INTENSE PERIOD OF UP TO TEN YEARS AFTER A NATURAL HAZARD STRIKES
  16. 16. THE CAPABILITY FOR RECOVERY INCREASES AS A COMMUNITY’S CAPABILITY TO PREPARE, PROTECT, WARN, AND RESPOND INCREASES
  17. 17. EXAMPLE: KOBE, JAPAN EARTHQUAKE: JANUARY 17, 1995
  18. 18. KOBE, JAPAN • ?
  19. 19. ANTICIPATION IS THE KEY TO PREPAREDNESS AND PROTECTION • WHERE AND WHEN WILL THE EARTHQUAKE LIKELY OCCUR? • HOW BIG OR STRONG IS IT LIKELY TO BE? • HOW STRONG ARE THE POTENTIAL DISASTER AGENTS LIKELY TO BE?
  20. 20. WHAT NEEDS TO BE ANTICIPATED (Continued)? • WHAT KINDS OF BUILDINGS ARE AT RISK? • WHAT KINDS OF BASIC, ESSENTIAL, AND CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE ARE AT RISK? • WHAT ARE THEIR PHYSICAL VULNERABILITIES
  21. 21. CONCLUSION: KOBE NEEDED TO BE READY FOR: • STRONG GROUND SHAKING, LIQUEFACTION, LANDSLIDES, AND POSSIBLE TSUNAMI WAVES • POSSIBLE FIRES • DAMAGE TO BUILDINGS AND INFRASTRUCTURE • WIDE-SPREAD LOSSES OF FUNCTION • DEATHS AND INJURIES • ECONOMIC LOSSES IN BILLIONS
  22. 22. CONCLUSION KOBE WAS A “PREPAREDNESS” AND “PROTECTION” FAILURE “EMERGENCY RESPONSE” AND “RECOVERY” SUCCESSES
  23. 23. EXAMPLE: NATIONS ADJACENT TO INDIAN OCEAN TSUNAMI DECEMBER 26, 2004
  24. 24. NATIONS AT RISK FROM TSUNAMIS
  25. 25. THE INDIAN-OCEAN NATIONS NEEDED TO BE READY FOR: • TSUNAMI WAVE RUN UP • COASTAL AREAS INUNDATED AND ERODED • BUILDINGS AND INFRASTRUCTURE IN COASTAL AREAS DAMAGED WITH LOSSES OF FUNCTION • 200,000 + DEATHS AND INJURIES • ECONOMIC LOSSES IN BILLIONS
  26. 26. DECEMBER 26, 2004 INDONESIA EARTHQUAKE-TSUNAMI DISASTER • TRIGGERED BY A SHALLOW, M 9.0 EARTHQUAKE LOCATED 155 MILES FROM SUMATRA • 10 M TSUNAMI WAVES WITH RUNUP OF ABOUT 2 MILES DEVASTATED SHORE LINES OF 12 NATIONS • NO EARLY WARNING • 0VER 200,000 PEOPLE KILLED
  27. 27. DECEMBER 26, 2004 INDONESIA EARTHQUAKE-TSUNAMI DISASTER • MILLIONS DISPLACED FROM HOMES • BILLIONS OF DOLLARS NEEDED FOR RECONSTRUCTION • INTERNATIONAL AID COORDINATED BY INDIA, AUSTRALIA, JAPAN, AND USA
  28. 28. CONCLUSION THE INDIAN-OCEAN NATIONS WERE “EARLY WARNING” AND “EMERGENCY RESPONSE” FAILURES “RECOVERY” SUCCESSES?? (due to limited areas of impact in each nation)
  29. 29. EXAMPLE: THE PHILIPPINES 2013 TYPHOON SEASON
  30. 30. THE PHILIPPINES
  31. 31. THE PHILIPPINES NEEDED TO BE READY FOR: • LANDFALL OF TROPICAL STORMS, TYPHOONS, AND A POSSIBLE SUPER TYPHOON, WHICH HAPPENED 11/08/13 • FLOODING AND LANDSLIDES • BUILDINGS AND INFRASTRUCTURE DAMAGED WITH LOSSES OF FUNCTION • DEATHS AND INJURIES • ECONOMIC LOSSES IN BILLIONS
  32. 32. LANDFALL ON FRIDAY MORNING, NOV. 8, 2013
  33. 33. FOUR HOURS OF FEAR AND DESTRUCTION • Winds flattened hundreds of homes, • Heavy rainfall triggered mudslides and flash flooding. • A storm surge with waves of up to 10 m (30 feet) destroyed everything, sweeping people away and drowning thousands. • Authorities said almost 800,000 people were evacuated to emergency shelters.
  34. 34. INITIAL IMPACTS IN THE PHILIPPINES • Wide spread flooding, mudslides, and power outages • Winds of 380 kph (290 mph) • TACLOBAN hit very hard by the storm surge with many deaths • Tacloban’s airport destroyed
  35. 35. INITIAL IMPACTS IN THE PHILIPPINES • Loss of communication • Estimates of up to 10,000 people dead • Economic losses in the billions
  36. 36. AN EVACUATION CENTER
  37. 37. DESTRUCTION EVERYWHERE
  38. 38. DESTRUCTION EVERYWHERE
  39. 39. USA MILITARY FORCES DISPATCHED TO ASSIST THE PHILIPPINES IN WHAT HAS BECOME A HISTORIC RELIEF EFFORT
  40. 40. CONCLUSION THE PHILIPPINES WERE “EARLY WARNING” SUCCESSES, BUT “PREPAREDNESS” AND “EMERGENCY RESPONSE” FAILURES** “RECOVERY” IS STILL UNDERWAY
  41. 41. **RATED AS PROBABLY THE STRONGEST TYPHOON EVER TO STRIKE THE PHILIPPINES SO, COST-EFFECTIVE “EMERGENCY RESPONSE” PROBABLY IMPOSSIBLE FOR ANY NATION
  42. 42. CONCLUSION EVERY YEAR, EVERY NATION HAS DOZENS OF “WINDOWS OF OPPORTUNITY” AFTER A NATURAL HAZARD STRIKES TO USE THE UPDATED BOOKS OF KNOWLEDGE FOR INNOVATIVE CAPACITY BUILDING OF ALL FIVE PILLARS

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