LEARNING FROM GLOBAL
DISASTER LABORATORIES
PART 3: HURRICANES
TRACKS OF MORE THAN 1325 HURRICANE
DISASTER LABORATORIES FOR LEARNING
• EACH HURRICANE
TEACHES
IMPORTANT
TECHNICAL AND
POL...
COMMUNITY
DATA BASES
AND INFORMATION
•SEVERE
WINDSTORMS
•INVENTORY
•VULNERABILITY
•LOCATION
RISK ASSESSMENT
RISK
ACCEPTABL...
NATIONS THAT NEED TO BECOME
HURRICANE DISASTER RESILIENT
• CANADA
• USA
• MEXICO
• CENTRAL AMERICA NATIONS
• JAIMAICA AND ...
WE CONTINUE TO OPERATE WITH
A FLAWED PREMISE:
KNOWLEDGE FROM HURRICANE
DISASTERS, WHICH OCCUR
ANNUALLY IN THE ATLANTIC AND...
FACT: IT USUALLY TAKES
MULTIPLE HURRICANE
DISASTERS BEFORE A STRICKEN
NATION WILL ADOPT AND
IMPLEMENT POLICIES THAT
MOVE I...
FACT:
MOST UNAFFECTED NATIONS DON’T
EVEN TRY TO LEARN ANYTHING NEW
FROM ANOTHER NATION’S
HURRICANE DISASTERS AND
CERTAINLY...
WIND AND WATER
PENETRATE BUILDING
ENVELOPE
HURRICANES
UPLIFT OF ROOF SYSTEM
FLYING DEBRIS PENETRATES
WINDOWS
STORM SURGE
H...
TYPICAL SOCIOECONOMIC
IMPACTS
• A community’s (worst case--the
Capital) functions are shut down
for a time
• Downed trees
...
TYPICAL SOCIOECONOMIC
IMPACTS
• Major roads blocked by debris
• Bridges washed out or
impassible
• Sea wall, levees, etc.,...
TYPICAL SOCIOECONOMIC
IMPACTS
• Region- and locale-specific
damage to food crops and
“money crops” (i.e., exportable
goods)
EXAMPLES OF PAST
HURRICANE DISASTER
LABORATORIES THAT
TAUGHT MANY LESSONS
SOME OF THE “BAD” HURRICANES:
1989-2013
• Hugo Sept 1989
• Andrew Aug
1992
• Opal Oct 1995
• Floyd Sept
1999
ANDREW: One of the most
intense and the last of the three
Category 5 hurricanes to make
US landfall in the 20th century,
A...
HURRICANE ANDREW:
CAT 5; AUG 24, 1992
HURRICANE ANDREW: FLORIDA
CITY, FL; AUG 25, 1992
SOME OF THE “BAD” HURRICANES:
1989-2013 (Continued)
• Mitch Nov 1998
• Charley Aug
2004
• Ivan Sept 2004
• Dennis 2005
• K...
KATRINA: Nearly every levee in
the Federal Protection System
of New Orleans’ was breached,
eventually causing 80 percent o...
HURRICANE KATRINA: NEW
ORLEANS; CAT 3, AUG 30, 2005
“BAD” HURRICANES: 1989-2013
(Continued)
• Rita Sept 2005
• Stan Sept 2005
• Wilma Oct 2005
• NONE 2006
HURRICANE RITA: EVACUATION
CENTER, SEPT 21, 2005
RITA: In addition to a record
evacuation of over 1 million
people that took evacuees to
places like the First Baptist
Chur...
HURRICANE WILMA: NAPLES,
FL; CAT 5, OCT 24, 2005
WILMA: A CAT 5 storm, Wilma
was the most intense hurricane
ever recorded in the Atlantic
basin, but it was a Category 3
wh...
SOME OF THE “BAD” HURRICANES:
1988-2013 (Continued)
• Dean 2007
• Felix 2007
• Noel, 2007
HURRICANE DEAN: CATEGORY 4
STORM ON AUGUST 18
HURRICANE DEAN: A CATEGORY
2-3 STORM ON AUGUST 17
• The eye of hurricane Dean, the first of
the North Atlantic season, pas...
SOME OF THE “BAD” HURRICANES:
1988-2013 (Continued)
• Gustav Sept
2008
• Ike 2008
• Paloma 2008
• NONE 2009
GUSTAV: Gustav prompted the
largest evacuation in USA
history-- 3 million people-- who
fled the oncoming hurricane,
after ...
HURRICANE GUSTAV: 3 MILLION
EVACUATING LA, SEPT 1, 2008
SOME OF THE “BAD” HURRICANES:
1989-2013 (Continued)
• Igor 2010
• Tomas 2010
• Irene 2011
• None 2012
• Sandy 2013
SANDY: A $300 BILLION
STORM; OCTOBER 24, 2012
Sandy, 2012’s ninth hurricane, became a
huge storm with wind and rain bands
...
CAT I HURRICANE SANDY:
OCTOBER 24
SUPER STORM SANDY:
OCT. 29-30, 2012
SANDY: RAIN IN HAITI
SANDY: RAIN IN CUBA
NOW SUPER STORM SANDY;
OCT. 29-30, 2013
NEW JERSEY: ATLANTIC
CITY UNDER WATER
NEW JERSEY: OCEAN
FRONT FLOODING
NEW JERSEY: STREETS
FLOODED
FLOODING IN BROOKLYN,
NY
$360 MILLION STORM SURGE,
NEW HAVEN, CT: OCT. 30
LESSON: THE TIMING OF
ANTICIPATORY ACTIONS IS VITAL
• The people who know: 1) what to
expect (e.g., storm surge, high-
vel...
LESSON: TIMELY EARLY WARNING
AND EVACUATION SAVES LIVES
• The people who have timely early
warning in conjunction with a
c...
TRACKING THE STORM
THREE MAJOR FACTORS:
GOOD COMMUNICATIONS
GOOD MESSAGING
SAFE HAVENS FOR
EVACUEES
“SAFE HAVENS” (I.E., EVACUATION
CENTERS)
LESSON: WIND ENGINEERED
BUILDINGS SAVE LIVES
• Buildings engineered to withstand
the risks from a hurricane’s high
velocit...
THE HURRICANE SAFE ROOM IS
A RECENT CONSTRUCTION
INNOVATION THAT SAVES LIVES
LESSON: EMERGENCY RESPONSE
SAVES LIVES AND PROTECTS
• The timing of emergency response
operations is vitally important for...
LESSON: EMERGENCY MEDICAL
PREPAREDNESS SAVES LIVES
• The local community’s capacity for
emergency health care offsets the
...
LESSON: THE INTERNATIONAL
COMMUNITY ALWAYS PROVIDES AID
• The International Community
provides millions to billions of
dol...
FACT:
HURRICANE DISASTER
RESILIENCE POLICIES BASED
ON LESSONS LEARNED FROM
PAST HURRICANE
LABORATORIES ARE NEEDED BY
MANY ...
PILLARS OF HURRICANE DISASTER
RESILIENCE
Preparedness
Adoption and Implementation of a Modern Wind
Engineering Building Co...
THE CHALLENGE:
POLICY CHANGES: CREATE, ADJUST, AND
REALIGN PROGRAMS, PARTNERS AND
PEOPLE UNTIL YOU HAVE CREATED THE
KINDS ...
CREATING TURNING POINTS FOR
HURRICANE DISASTER
RESILIENCE
 USING EDUCATIONAL SURGES CONTAINING
THE PAST AND PRESENT LESSO...
CREATING TURNING POINTS FOR
HURRICANE DISASTER
RESILIENCE
INTEGRATION OF SCIENTIFIC AND
TECHNICAL SOLUTIONS WITH POLITICA...
PART 3 HURRICANES  LEARNING FROM GLOBAL DISASTER LABORATORIES 2014
PART 3 HURRICANES  LEARNING FROM GLOBAL DISASTER LABORATORIES 2014
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PART 3 HURRICANES LEARNING FROM GLOBAL DISASTER LABORATORIES 2014

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Each Hurricane Teaches Important Technical And Political Lessons About Hurricane Disaster Resilience. Knowledge From Hurricane Disasters, Which Occur Annually In The Atlantic And Eastern Pacific Basins,Is Enough To Make Any Nation Susceptible To Hurricanes Adopt And Implement Policies That Will Facilitate Its Disaster Resilience. Integration Of Scientific And Technical Solutions With Political Solutions For Policies On Preparedness, Protection, Early Warning, Emergency Response, And Recovery Presentation Courtesy Of Dr. Walter Hays, Global Alliance For Disaster Reduction

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PART 3 HURRICANES LEARNING FROM GLOBAL DISASTER LABORATORIES 2014

  1. 1. LEARNING FROM GLOBAL DISASTER LABORATORIES PART 3: HURRICANES
  2. 2. TRACKS OF MORE THAN 1325 HURRICANE DISASTER LABORATORIES FOR LEARNING • EACH HURRICANE TEACHES IMPORTANT TECHNICAL AND POLITICAL LESSONS ABOUT HURRICANE DISASTER RESILIENCE.
  3. 3. COMMUNITY DATA BASES AND INFORMATION •SEVERE WINDSTORMS •INVENTORY •VULNERABILITY •LOCATION RISK ASSESSMENT RISK ACCEPTABLE RISK UNACCEPTABLE RISK HURRICANE DISASTERR RESILIENCE •PREPAREDNESS •PROTECTIONS •EARLY WARNING •EMERGENCY RESPONSE •RECOVERY and RECONSTRUCTION POLICY OPTIONS Wind profile Storm Hazards: -Wind pressure -Surge -Rain -Flood -Waves -Salt water -Missiles -Tornadoes Ocean Gradient Wind
  4. 4. NATIONS THAT NEED TO BECOME HURRICANE DISASTER RESILIENT • CANADA • USA • MEXICO • CENTRAL AMERICA NATIONS • JAIMAICA AND WEST INDIES • CARIBBEAN BASIN NATIONS
  5. 5. WE CONTINUE TO OPERATE WITH A FLAWED PREMISE: KNOWLEDGE FROM HURRICANE DISASTERS, WHICH OCCUR ANNUALLY IN THE ATLANTIC AND EASTERN PACIFIC BASINS, IS ENOUGH TO MAKE ANY NATION SUSCEPTIBLE TO HURRICANES ADOPT AND IMPLEMENT POLICIES THAT WILL FACILITATE ITS DISASTER RESILIENCE
  6. 6. FACT: IT USUALLY TAKES MULTIPLE HURRICANE DISASTERS BEFORE A STRICKEN NATION WILL ADOPT AND IMPLEMENT POLICIES THAT MOVE IT TOWARDS HURRICANE DISASTER RESILIENCE
  7. 7. FACT: MOST UNAFFECTED NATIONS DON’T EVEN TRY TO LEARN ANYTHING NEW FROM ANOTHER NATION’S HURRICANE DISASTERS AND CERTAINLY DON’T CONSIDER THEM TO BE A BASIS FOR CHANGING EXISTING POLICIES
  8. 8. WIND AND WATER PENETRATE BUILDING ENVELOPE HURRICANES UPLIFT OF ROOF SYSTEM FLYING DEBRIS PENETRATES WINDOWS STORM SURGE HEAVY PRECIPITATION IN A SHORT TIME FLASH FLOODING (MUDFLOWS) LANDSLIDES (MUDFLOWS) CAUSES OF RISK GLOBAL DISASTER LABORATORIES
  9. 9. TYPICAL SOCIOECONOMIC IMPACTS • A community’s (worst case--the Capital) functions are shut down for a time • Downed trees • Flooded streets • Power outages • Roofs ripped off
  10. 10. TYPICAL SOCIOECONOMIC IMPACTS • Major roads blocked by debris • Bridges washed out or impassible • Sea wall, levees, etc., damaged • Airport closed; planes damaged on the runway • Landslides
  11. 11. TYPICAL SOCIOECONOMIC IMPACTS • Region- and locale-specific damage to food crops and “money crops” (i.e., exportable goods)
  12. 12. EXAMPLES OF PAST HURRICANE DISASTER LABORATORIES THAT TAUGHT MANY LESSONS
  13. 13. SOME OF THE “BAD” HURRICANES: 1989-2013 • Hugo Sept 1989 • Andrew Aug 1992 • Opal Oct 1995 • Floyd Sept 1999
  14. 14. ANDREW: One of the most intense and the last of the three Category 5 hurricanes to make US landfall in the 20th century, Andrew had sustained winds of 165 mi/hr and caused catastrophic damage in Florida.
  15. 15. HURRICANE ANDREW: CAT 5; AUG 24, 1992
  16. 16. HURRICANE ANDREW: FLORIDA CITY, FL; AUG 25, 1992
  17. 17. SOME OF THE “BAD” HURRICANES: 1989-2013 (Continued) • Mitch Nov 1998 • Charley Aug 2004 • Ivan Sept 2004 • Dennis 2005 • Katrina Aug 2005
  18. 18. KATRINA: Nearly every levee in the Federal Protection System of New Orleans’ was breached, eventually causing 80 percent of the city to be flooded, and 1,836 people to lose their lives. .
  19. 19. HURRICANE KATRINA: NEW ORLEANS; CAT 3, AUG 30, 2005
  20. 20. “BAD” HURRICANES: 1989-2013 (Continued) • Rita Sept 2005 • Stan Sept 2005 • Wilma Oct 2005 • NONE 2006
  21. 21. HURRICANE RITA: EVACUATION CENTER, SEPT 21, 2005
  22. 22. RITA: In addition to a record evacuation of over 1 million people that took evacuees to places like the First Baptist Church in Tyler, TX, Rita’s winds, waves, and storm surge caused damage to the oil industry and flooding in New Orleans again.
  23. 23. HURRICANE WILMA: NAPLES, FL; CAT 5, OCT 24, 2005
  24. 24. WILMA: A CAT 5 storm, Wilma was the most intense hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic basin, but it was a Category 3 when it made landfall in several places, causing devastation in the Yucatan Peninsula, Cuba, and Florida.
  25. 25. SOME OF THE “BAD” HURRICANES: 1988-2013 (Continued) • Dean 2007 • Felix 2007 • Noel, 2007
  26. 26. HURRICANE DEAN: CATEGORY 4 STORM ON AUGUST 18
  27. 27. HURRICANE DEAN: A CATEGORY 2-3 STORM ON AUGUST 17 • The eye of hurricane Dean, the first of the North Atlantic season, passed between the Caribbean islands: St. Lucia and Martinique, on Friday, August 17. • The two islands, less than 80 km (50 mi) apart were, were struck with winds of 165 - 200 km per hour (100 - 125 mi per hour), storm surge, and heavy rain.
  28. 28. SOME OF THE “BAD” HURRICANES: 1988-2013 (Continued) • Gustav Sept 2008 • Ike 2008 • Paloma 2008 • NONE 2009
  29. 29. GUSTAV: Gustav prompted the largest evacuation in USA history-- 3 million people-- who fled the oncoming hurricane, after it had made landfall in Haiti and Cuba, crossed the Gulf of Mexico, and made landfall again in Cocodrie, La., on Sept. 1, 2008.
  30. 30. HURRICANE GUSTAV: 3 MILLION EVACUATING LA, SEPT 1, 2008
  31. 31. SOME OF THE “BAD” HURRICANES: 1989-2013 (Continued) • Igor 2010 • Tomas 2010 • Irene 2011 • None 2012 • Sandy 2013
  32. 32. SANDY: A $300 BILLION STORM; OCTOBER 24, 2012 Sandy, 2012’s ninth hurricane, became a huge storm with wind and rain bands reaching out 500 km or more from the storm center, producing 15-50 cm of rain and flooding in Jamaica, Bermuda, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Cuba, New Jersey, and New York
  33. 33. CAT I HURRICANE SANDY: OCTOBER 24
  34. 34. SUPER STORM SANDY: OCT. 29-30, 2012
  35. 35. SANDY: RAIN IN HAITI
  36. 36. SANDY: RAIN IN CUBA
  37. 37. NOW SUPER STORM SANDY; OCT. 29-30, 2013
  38. 38. NEW JERSEY: ATLANTIC CITY UNDER WATER
  39. 39. NEW JERSEY: OCEAN FRONT FLOODING
  40. 40. NEW JERSEY: STREETS FLOODED
  41. 41. FLOODING IN BROOKLYN, NY
  42. 42. $360 MILLION STORM SURGE, NEW HAVEN, CT: OCT. 30
  43. 43. LESSON: THE TIMING OF ANTICIPATORY ACTIONS IS VITAL • The people who know: 1) what to expect (e.g., storm surge, high- velocity winds, rain, flash floods, and landslides,), 2) where and when it will happen, and 3) what they should (and should not) do to prepare will survive.
  44. 44. LESSON: TIMELY EARLY WARNING AND EVACUATION SAVES LIVES • The people who have timely early warning in conjunction with a community evacuation plan that facilitates getting out of harm’s way from the risks associated with storm surge, high winds, flooding, and landslides will survive.
  45. 45. TRACKING THE STORM
  46. 46. THREE MAJOR FACTORS: GOOD COMMUNICATIONS GOOD MESSAGING SAFE HAVENS FOR EVACUEES
  47. 47. “SAFE HAVENS” (I.E., EVACUATION CENTERS)
  48. 48. LESSON: WIND ENGINEERED BUILDINGS SAVE LIVES • Buildings engineered to withstand the risks from a hurricane’s high velocity winds will maintain their function and protect occupants and users from death and injury.
  49. 49. THE HURRICANE SAFE ROOM IS A RECENT CONSTRUCTION INNOVATION THAT SAVES LIVES
  50. 50. LESSON: EMERGENCY RESPONSE SAVES LIVES AND PROTECTS • The timing of emergency response operations is vitally important for search and rescue and provision of emergency services to save lives and protect property.
  51. 51. LESSON: EMERGENCY MEDICAL PREPAREDNESS SAVES LIVES • The local community’s capacity for emergency health care offsets the crisis caused by damaged hospitals and medical facilities, lack of clean drinking water, food, and medicine, and high levels of morbidity and mortality.
  52. 52. LESSON: THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY ALWAYS PROVIDES AID • The International Community provides millions to billions of dollars in relief to help “pick up the pieces, ” but this strategy is not enough by itself to ensure disaster resilience.
  53. 53. FACT: HURRICANE DISASTER RESILIENCE POLICIES BASED ON LESSONS LEARNED FROM PAST HURRICANE LABORATORIES ARE NEEDED BY MANY NATIONS
  54. 54. PILLARS OF HURRICANE DISASTER RESILIENCE Preparedness Adoption and Implementation of a Modern Wind Engineering Building Code Time,y Early Warning and Evacuation Timely Emergency Response (including Emergency Medical Services) Casualty insurance to underwrite losss Cost-Effective Recovery
  55. 55. THE CHALLENGE: POLICY CHANGES: CREATE, ADJUST, AND REALIGN PROGRAMS, PARTNERS AND PEOPLE UNTIL YOU HAVE CREATED THE KINDS OF TURNING POINTS NEEDED FOR MOVING TOWARDS HURRICANE RESILIENCE
  56. 56. CREATING TURNING POINTS FOR HURRICANE DISASTER RESILIENCE  USING EDUCATIONAL SURGES CONTAINING THE PAST AND PRESENT LESSONS TO FOSTER AND ACCELERATE THE CREATION OF TURNING POINTS
  57. 57. CREATING TURNING POINTS FOR HURRICANE DISASTER RESILIENCE INTEGRATION OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL SOLUTIONS WITH POLITICAL SOLUTIONS FOR POLICIES ON PREPAREDNESS, PROTECTION, EARLY WARNING, EMERGENCY RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY
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