LEARNING FROM GLOBAL
DISASTER LABORATORIES
PART 1: TYPHOONS
WIND AND WATER
PENETRATE BUILDING
ENVELOPE
TYPHOONS
UPLIFT OF ROOF SYSTEM
FLYING DEBRIS PENETRATES
WINDOWS
STORM SURGE
HEA...
EXAMPLE:
SUPER TYPHOON HAIYAN
- - -A DISASTER LABORATORY FOR
THE PHILIPPINES IN 2013- - -
PAID OFF IN 2014
SUPER TYPHOON HAIYAN
DEVASTATED THE PHILIPPINES
NOVEMBER 8-10, 2013
HAIYAN REACHED THE
PHILIPPINES: FRIDAY, NOV. 8
HAIYAN: A SUPER TYPHOON
WE BELIEVE A FLAWED PREMISE:
TYPHOON DISASTERS, WHICH
OCCUR ANNUALLY,
SHOULD BE ENOUGH TO MAKE
ANY NATION SUSCEPTIBLE TO
T...
FACT: IT USUALLY TAKES
MULTIPLE DISASTERS BEFORE A
STRICKEN NATION WILL ADOPT
POLICIES TO MOVE TOWARDS
DISASTER RESILIENT
FACT:
MOST UNAFFECTED NATIONS
DON’T EVEN TRY TO LEARN
ANYTHING NEW FROM ANOTHER
NATION’S DISASTERS AND
CERTAINLY DON’T CHA...
2014 TYPHOON SEASON
TYPHOON RAMMASUN
Tuesday, July 15, 2014
TYPHOON RAMMASUN
(a Thai term for “God of
Thunder”)
(AKA GLENDA locally)
IMPACTED THE PHILIPPINES
Wednesday, July 16, 2014
Rammasun (CAT 3) was the
strongest storm to threaten the
country since Haiyan, a Cat-5
"super typhoon" that wiped
out near...
TYPHOON RAMMASUN
JULY 14
• Typhoon Rammasun (the 7th storm
of 2014 to hit the Philippines)
arrived at Rapu-Rapu island in the
eastern provi...
RAMMASUN WAS HEADED
FOR MANILLA—THE FIRST
DIRECT HIT ON THE CAPITOL
IN FOUR YEARS—ON JULY 14,
2014
TYPHOON RAMMASUN’S
PREDICTED PATH
THE PREMISE:
BY NOW, THE PHILIPPINES
SHOULD HAVE LEARNED THE
LESSONS ON WHAT TO DO
BEFORE, DURING, AND AFTER A
TYPHOON DIS...
- - - (AND THEY DID!!)
THE PEOPLE OF THE PHILIPPINES
APPLIED THE
VITAL LESSONS LEARNED
8 MONTHS EARLIER FROM
HAIYAN, AND M...
TIMELY ANTICIPATORY
ACTIONS
• At least 300,000 people had
already fled from their homes
in Albay province alone.
• However...
TIMELY ANTICIPATORY
ACTIONS
• Schools were closed.
• International flights were
cancelled.
• The army was placed on high
a...
PHYSICAL DETAILS
• Typhoon Rammasun, with
gusts of up to 160 kph (99 mph)
and sustained winds of 130 kph
(81 mph) near its...
JULY 15,TYPHOON RAMMASUN
WAS HEADED TOWARDS MANILLA
GOOD NEWS ON JULY 16:
The eye of Typhoon
Rammasun made a late shift
away from Manila,
significantly reducing the
damage to...
LESSON: THE TIMING OF
ANTICIPATORY ACTIONS IS VITAL
• The people who know: 1) what to
expect (e.g., high-velocity winds,
r...
JULY 14-16: TRACKING THE
STORM IN MANILA OFFICE
LESSON: TIMELY EARLY WARNING
AND EVACUATION SAVES LIVES
• The people who have timely early
warning in conjunction with a
c...
A MAJOR FACTOR:
FORTUNATELY, GOOD
COMMUNICATIONS HAD
MOTIVATED OVER 400,000
PEOPLE TO EVACUATE
AN EVACUATION CENTER:
LEGAZPI CITY
LESSON: EMERGENCY RESPONSE
SAVES LIVES
• The “Uncontrollable and
Unthinkable” events will always
hinder the timing of emer...
LESSON: EMERGENCY MEDICAL
PREPAREDNESS SAVES LIVES
• Damaged hospitals and medical
facilities combined with lack of
clean ...
SOCIOECONOMIC IMPACTS
• Flooded streets
• Bridges washed out or
impassible
• Sea wall damaged
• Airport closed; planes
dam...
STRANDED AT INTERNATIONAL
AIRPORT: MANILA
Typhoon Rammasun’s peak
winds of 150 kilometers (93
miles) per hour and gusts up
to 185 kph (115 mph) caused
major socio-e...
SOCIOECONOMIC IMPACTS
• The Capital’s functions were
shut down for a time
• Downed trees
• Power outages
• 20,000+ Roofs r...
MANILA BAY: TRYING TO
REINFORCE FRAGILE HOUSES
LESSON: WIND ENGINEERED
BUILDINGS SAVE LIVES
• Buildings engineered to withstand
the risks from a typhoon’s high
velocity ...
SOCIOECONOMIC IMPACTS
• Damage to crops (rice and
corn) was estimated at around
668 million pesos, or about $15
million.
Good News: According to the
Mayor of Manila, no deaths.
However, 77 deaths were
ultimatedly reported in other
locations..
MANILA BAY: EXAMPLE OF
DAMAGE TO FRAGILE HOUSES
REPLACING LIQUID GAS IN
HOME
FLOODED STREETS:
QUEZON CITY
FLOODED STREETS: QUEZON
CITY, GREATER MANILA
LOCAL “S AND R”
Search and Rescue and Relief
Efforts Will be Hampered by
Landslides and Damaged Road
Systems
LESSON: All Kinds of Things W...
DOWNED TREE: MANILA
STRENGTHENING A
DAMAGED SEA WALL
DAMAGED BRIDGE
DAMAGED BRIDGE
LESSON: THE INTERNATIONAL
COMMUNITY ALWAYS PROVIDES AID
• The International Community
provides millions to billions of
dol...
WEDNESDAY, JULY 2014
• A weakened Rammasun
heading toward China's Hainan
Island and northern Vietnam.
• WARNING: It could ...
FACT:
TYPHOON DISASTER RESILIENCE
POLICIES BASED ON LESSONS
LEARNED FROM PAST TYPHOON
LABORATORIES ARE NEEDED BY
MANY NATI...
PILLARS OF TYPHOON DISASTER
RESILIENCE
Preparedness
Adoption and Implementation of a Modern Wind
Engineering Building Code...
COMMUNITIES
DATA BASES
AND INFORMATION
HAZARDS:
GROUND SHAKING
GROUND FAILURE
SURFACE FAULTING
TECTONIC DEFORMATION
TSUNAM...
THE CHALLENGE:
POLICY CHANGES: CREATE, ADJUST, AND
REALIGN PROGRAMS, PARTNERS AND
PEOPLE UNTIL YOU HAVE CREATED THE
KINDS ...
CREATING TURNING POINTS FOR
TYPHOON DISASTER
RESILIENCE
 USING EDUCATIONAL SURGES CONTAINING
THE PAST AND PRESENT LESSONS...
CREATING TURNING POINTS FOR
TYPHOON DISASTER
RESILIENCE
INTEGRATION OF SCIENTIFIC AND
TECHNICAL SOLUTIONS WITH POLITICAL
...
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Part 1 Typhoons. Learning from Global Disaster Laboratories in 2014

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We believe a flawed premise. Typhoon disasters, which occur annually, should be enough to make any nation susceptible to typhoons adopt and implement policies that will lead to their typhoon disaster resilience. Fact: it usually takes multiple disasters before a stricken nation will adopt policies to move towards disaster resilient. Creating turning points for typhoon disaster resilience. Integration of scientific and technical solutions with political solutions for policies on preparedness, protection, early warning, emergency response, and recovery. Presentation courtesy of Dr. Walter Hays, Global Alliance for Disaster Reduction

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Part 1 Typhoons. Learning from Global Disaster Laboratories in 2014

  1. 1. LEARNING FROM GLOBAL DISASTER LABORATORIES PART 1: TYPHOONS
  2. 2. WIND AND WATER PENETRATE BUILDING ENVELOPE TYPHOONS UPLIFT OF ROOF SYSTEM FLYING DEBRIS PENETRATES WINDOWS STORM SURGE HEAVY PRECIPITATION FLASH FLOODING (MUDFLOWS) LANDSLIDES (MUDFLOWS) CAUSES OF RISK GLOBAL DISASTER LABORATORIES
  3. 3. EXAMPLE: SUPER TYPHOON HAIYAN - - -A DISASTER LABORATORY FOR THE PHILIPPINES IN 2013- - - PAID OFF IN 2014
  4. 4. SUPER TYPHOON HAIYAN DEVASTATED THE PHILIPPINES NOVEMBER 8-10, 2013
  5. 5. HAIYAN REACHED THE PHILIPPINES: FRIDAY, NOV. 8
  6. 6. HAIYAN: A SUPER TYPHOON
  7. 7. WE BELIEVE A FLAWED PREMISE: TYPHOON DISASTERS, WHICH OCCUR ANNUALLY, SHOULD BE ENOUGH TO MAKE ANY NATION SUSCEPTIBLE TO TYPHOONS ADOPT AND IMPLEMENT POLICIES THAT WILL LEAD TO THEIR TYPHOON DISASTER RESILIENCE
  8. 8. FACT: IT USUALLY TAKES MULTIPLE DISASTERS BEFORE A STRICKEN NATION WILL ADOPT POLICIES TO MOVE TOWARDS DISASTER RESILIENT
  9. 9. FACT: MOST UNAFFECTED NATIONS DON’T EVEN TRY TO LEARN ANYTHING NEW FROM ANOTHER NATION’S DISASTERS AND CERTAINLY DON’T CHANGE THEIR EXISTING POLICIES
  10. 10. 2014 TYPHOON SEASON TYPHOON RAMMASUN Tuesday, July 15, 2014
  11. 11. TYPHOON RAMMASUN (a Thai term for “God of Thunder”) (AKA GLENDA locally) IMPACTED THE PHILIPPINES Wednesday, July 16, 2014
  12. 12. Rammasun (CAT 3) was the strongest storm to threaten the country since Haiyan, a Cat-5 "super typhoon" that wiped out nearly everything in its path when it crossed over the central Philippines in November, 2013.
  13. 13. TYPHOON RAMMASUN
  14. 14. JULY 14 • Typhoon Rammasun (the 7th storm of 2014 to hit the Philippines) arrived at Rapu-Rapu island in the eastern province of Albay with gusts of up to 160 kph (99 mph) and sustained winds of 130 kph (81 mph) near its centre.,
  15. 15. RAMMASUN WAS HEADED FOR MANILLA—THE FIRST DIRECT HIT ON THE CAPITOL IN FOUR YEARS—ON JULY 14, 2014
  16. 16. TYPHOON RAMMASUN’S PREDICTED PATH
  17. 17. THE PREMISE: BY NOW, THE PHILIPPINES SHOULD HAVE LEARNED THE LESSONS ON WHAT TO DO BEFORE, DURING, AND AFTER A TYPHOON DISASTER FROM PAST TYPHOONS
  18. 18. - - - (AND THEY DID!!) THE PEOPLE OF THE PHILIPPINES APPLIED THE VITAL LESSONS LEARNED 8 MONTHS EARLIER FROM HAIYAN, AND MANY OTHERS
  19. 19. TIMELY ANTICIPATORY ACTIONS • At least 300,000 people had already fled from their homes in Albay province alone. • However, many people were unwilling to evacuate.
  20. 20. TIMELY ANTICIPATORY ACTIONS • Schools were closed. • International flights were cancelled. • The army was placed on high alert.
  21. 21. PHYSICAL DETAILS • Typhoon Rammasun, with gusts of up to 160 kph (99 mph) and sustained winds of 130 kph (81 mph) near its centre, hit land over Rapu-Rapu island in the eastern province of Albay,
  22. 22. JULY 15,TYPHOON RAMMASUN WAS HEADED TOWARDS MANILLA
  23. 23. GOOD NEWS ON JULY 16: The eye of Typhoon Rammasun made a late shift away from Manila, significantly reducing the damage to the capitol city of 17 million people.
  24. 24. LESSON: THE TIMING OF ANTICIPATORY ACTIONS IS VITAL • The people who know: 1) what to expect (e.g., high-velocity winds, rain, flash floods, landslides, and storm surge), 2) where and when it will happen, and 3) what they should (and should not) do to prepare will survive.
  25. 25. JULY 14-16: TRACKING THE STORM IN MANILA OFFICE
  26. 26. LESSON: TIMELY EARLY WARNING AND EVACUATION SAVES LIVES • The people who have timely early warning in conjunction with a community evacuation plan that facilitates getting out of harm’s way from the risks associated with storm surge, high winds, flooding, and landslides will survive.
  27. 27. A MAJOR FACTOR: FORTUNATELY, GOOD COMMUNICATIONS HAD MOTIVATED OVER 400,000 PEOPLE TO EVACUATE
  28. 28. AN EVACUATION CENTER: LEGAZPI CITY
  29. 29. LESSON: EMERGENCY RESPONSE SAVES LIVES • The “Uncontrollable and Unthinkable” events will always hinder the timing of emergency response operations.
  30. 30. LESSON: EMERGENCY MEDICAL PREPAREDNESS SAVES LIVES • Damaged hospitals and medical facilities combined with lack of clean drinking water, food, and medicine, and high levels of morbidity and mortality will quickly overrun the local community’s capacity for emergency health care.
  31. 31. SOCIOECONOMIC IMPACTS • Flooded streets • Bridges washed out or impassible • Sea wall damaged • Airport closed; planes damaged on the runway • Landslides
  32. 32. STRANDED AT INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT: MANILA
  33. 33. Typhoon Rammasun’s peak winds of 150 kilometers (93 miles) per hour and gusts up to 185 kph (115 mph) caused major socio-economic impacts
  34. 34. SOCIOECONOMIC IMPACTS • The Capital’s functions were shut down for a time • Downed trees • Power outages • 20,000+ Roofs ripped off • Major roads blocked by debris
  35. 35. MANILA BAY: TRYING TO REINFORCE FRAGILE HOUSES
  36. 36. LESSON: WIND ENGINEERED BUILDINGS SAVE LIVES • Buildings engineered to withstand the risks from a typhoon’s high velocity winds will maintain their function and protect occupants and users from death and injury.
  37. 37. SOCIOECONOMIC IMPACTS • Damage to crops (rice and corn) was estimated at around 668 million pesos, or about $15 million.
  38. 38. Good News: According to the Mayor of Manila, no deaths. However, 77 deaths were ultimatedly reported in other locations..
  39. 39. MANILA BAY: EXAMPLE OF DAMAGE TO FRAGILE HOUSES
  40. 40. REPLACING LIQUID GAS IN HOME
  41. 41. FLOODED STREETS: QUEZON CITY
  42. 42. FLOODED STREETS: QUEZON CITY, GREATER MANILA
  43. 43. LOCAL “S AND R”
  44. 44. Search and Rescue and Relief Efforts Will be Hampered by Landslides and Damaged Road Systems LESSON: All Kinds of Things Will go Wrong During the Emergency Response Period When the Uncontrollable and Unthinkable Happen.
  45. 45. DOWNED TREE: MANILA
  46. 46. STRENGTHENING A DAMAGED SEA WALL
  47. 47. DAMAGED BRIDGE
  48. 48. DAMAGED BRIDGE
  49. 49. LESSON: THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY ALWAYS PROVIDES AID • The International Community provides millions to billions of dollars in relief to help “pick up the pieces, ” but this strategy is not enough by itself to ensure disaster resilience.
  50. 50. WEDNESDAY, JULY 2014 • A weakened Rammasun heading toward China's Hainan Island and northern Vietnam. • WARNING: It could strengthen again in the open water- - - • (and it did!)
  51. 51. FACT: TYPHOON DISASTER RESILIENCE POLICIES BASED ON LESSONS LEARNED FROM PAST TYPHOON LABORATORIES ARE NEEDED BY MANY NATIONS
  52. 52. PILLARS OF TYPHOON DISASTER RESILIENCE Preparedness Adoption and Implementation of a Modern Wind Engineering Building Code Time,y Early Warning and Evacuation Timely Emergency Response (including Emergency Medical Services) Cost-Effective Recovery
  53. 53. COMMUNITIES DATA BASES AND INFORMATION HAZARDS: GROUND SHAKING GROUND FAILURE SURFACE FAULTING TECTONIC DEFORMATION TSUNAMI RUN UP AFTERSHOCKS • TYPHOON HAZARDS •INVENTORY •VULNERABILITY •LOCATION TYPHOON RISK RISK ACCEPTABLE RISK UNACCEPTABLE RISK TYPHOON DISASTER RESILIENCE •PREPAREDNESS •PROTECTION •FORECASTS/SCENARIOS •EMERGENCY RESPONSE •RECOVERY and RECONSTRUCTION POLICY OPTIONS
  54. 54. THE CHALLENGE: POLICY CHANGES: CREATE, ADJUST, AND REALIGN PROGRAMS, PARTNERS AND PEOPLE UNTIL YOU HAVE CREATED THE KINDS OF TURNING POINTS NEEDED FOR MOVING TOWARDS TYPHOON RESILIENCE
  55. 55. CREATING TURNING POINTS FOR TYPHOON DISASTER RESILIENCE  USING EDUCATIONAL SURGES CONTAINING THE PAST AND PRESENT LESSONS TO FOSTER AND ACCELERATE THE CREATION OF TURNING POINTS
  56. 56. CREATING TURNING POINTS FOR TYPHOON DISASTER RESILIENCE INTEGRATION OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL SOLUTIONS WITH POLITICAL SOLUTIONS FOR POLICIES ON PREPAREDNESS, PROTECTION, EARLY WARNING, EMERGENCY RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY

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