Haiti: Emergency Revision of the 2012 Consolidated Appeal - Needs arising from the impact of Hurricane Sandy
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Haiti: Emergency Revision of the 2012 Consolidated Appeal - Needs arising from the impact of Hurricane Sandy

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Assessments indicate that the new needs arising from Sandy will require US$139.9 million in additional funding over 2012 and 2013. Of this, $23.2 million will be required to finance the first phase of ...

Assessments indicate that the new needs arising from Sandy will require US$139.9 million in additional funding over 2012 and 2013. Of this, $23.2 million will be required to finance the first phase of the response until the end of the year, which is outlined in this Emergency Revision of the 2012 CAP. This first phase will immediately address the critical needs of 1.26 million people in food security and nutrition, shelter, health, WASH, and education. This brings the 2012 CAP's overall revised requirements to $151,080,810, and leaving unmet requirements of $95,344,094.

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Haiti: Emergency Revision of the 2012 Consolidated Appeal - Needs arising from the impact of Hurricane Sandy Haiti: Emergency Revision of the 2012 Consolidated Appeal - Needs arising from the impact of Hurricane Sandy Document Transcript

  • HAITIEMERGENCY REVISION OF THE 2012CONSOLIDATED APPEALNeeds arising from the impact of HurricaneSandy Hurricane Sandy passed to the west of Haiti October 25, 2012 causing heavy rains and winds, flooding homes and overflowing rivers.- Photo Logan Abassi UN/MINUSTAH
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012TABLE OF CONTENTS1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................................ 1 HUMANITARIAN DASHBOARD..................................................................................................... 2 Table I: Requirements and funding to date per sector and projects in the Emergency Revision ......... 3 Table II: Requirements and funding to date per organization in the Emergency Revision .................. 42. CONTEXT AND HUMANITARIAN CONSEQUENCES ......................................................... 5 2.1 Context ........................................................................................................................................... 5 2.2 Response to date ............................................................................................................................. 6 2.3 Funding to date ............................................................................................................................... 73. HUMANITARIAN CONSEQUENCES AND NEEDS ANALYSIS .......................................... 84. CLUSTER RESPONSE PLANS ................................................................................................... 9 4.1 Food security and Nutrition............................................................................................................ 9 4.2 CCCM and Shelter ....................................................................................................................... 13 4.3 Health and WASH ........................................................................................................................ 16 Health system .................................................................................................................................. 16 WASH .................................................................................................................................. 17 4.4 Education ...................................................................................................................................... 195. CONTACTS .................................................................................................................................. 21ANNEX I: LIST OF PROJECTS ....................................................................................................... 22ANNEX II: ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ...................................................................... 26 ii
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012 iii
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 20121. EXECUTIVE SUMMARYHurricane Sandy hit Haiti on 23 October. Three consecutive days of heavy rain caused severeflooding in the country, causing serious loss of life and damaging and destroying homes and publicinfrastructure. The Government of Haiti declared a state of emergency on 30 October.The impact of the hurricane has generated a number of 2012 Haiti Consolidated Appeal Emergency Revision for Hurricane Sandycritical humanitarian needs and exacerbated existing Duration October 2012 –ones. Of utmost concern are the 1.5 million people December 2012living in severe food insecurity in rural areas most Affected An estimated 2 millionaffected by the hurricane. This is due to the loss of Population peopleagricultural land, livelihoods and harvests, and the Areas targeted by 92 out of 140damage to the few agricultural areas spared by this Emergency communes in theyear’s drought and Tropical Storm Isaac in August. Up Revision South, South-East,to 450,000 people, including at least 4,000 children West, Artibonite (mainlyunder the age of five are at risk of severe acute north), Northeast, Centre and Grand’Ansemalnutrition as a result. With harvests destroyed in Departmentsmost of the country, the entire country’s food security Key sectors for Food Security &situation is threatened. response Nutrition CCCM &ShelterThe hurricane also destroyed at least 6,274 houses and Health & WASHdamaged a further 21,427 according to the Haitian EducationDirectorate for Civil Protection (DPC). Out of the Key target  426,000 for food,estimated 31,370 people who lost their houses, the beneficiaries agriculture, and (approximate nutritionmajority are now living with host families or in figures)improvised accommodation, while 2,949 are still living  10,000 for health  22,674 for shelterin 18 hurricane shelters where they took refuge during or  750,000 for WASHafter the storm. Hundreds of public buildings and  50,000 for educationfacilities, including cholera treatment facilities, hospitalsand schools, were destroyed, and infrastructure, notably Total additional funding requestedpotable water networks, suffered significant damage. Beneficiaries of this for thisNew cholera outbreaks in the coming weeks and months Emergency Revision Emergencyare feared as a result. In addition, roads and bridges Revisionwere destroyed or badly damaged; river banks collapsed, 23.2 million 1,26 million peoplewashing away arable lands.Assessments indicate that the new needs arising from Sandy will require US$ 1 39.9 million inadditional funding over 2012 and 2013. Of this, $23.2 million will be required to finance the firstphase of the response until the end of the year, which is outlined in this Emergency Revision of the2012 CAP. This first phase will immediately address the critical needs of 1.26 million people in foodsecurity and nutrition, shelter, health, WASH, and education. This brings the 2012 CAPs overallrevised requirements to $151,080,810, and leaving unmet requirements of $95,344,094.1 All dollar signs in this document denote United States dollars. Funding for this appeal should be reported tothe Financial Tracking Service (FTS, fts@un.org), which will display its requirements and funding on the current 1
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012HUMANITARIAN DASHBOARD 8.9m 22% 2
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012Table I: Requirements and funding to date per sector andprojects in the Emergency Revision Consolidated Appeal for Haiti 2012 – Emergency Revision for Hurricane Sandy as of 10 November 2012 http://fts.unocha.org Compiled by OCHA on the basis of information provided by donors and appealing organizations.Sector Original Revised Funding Unmet % Uncommitted requirements requirements requirements Covered pledges ($) ($) ($) ($) ($) A B C D=B-C E=C/B FAGRICULTURE 10,000,000 5,610,354 1,893,191 5,207,163 33% -CAMP COORDINATIONAND CAMP 2,520,574 8,560,946 - 8,560,946 0% -MANAGEMENT (CCCM)AND SHELTEREDUCATION 1,300,000 1,767,425 654,320 1,113,105 37% -FOOD AID - 5,565,000 - 5,565,000 0% -HEALTH 3,543,286 2,383,323 566,945 1,816,378 24% -NUTRITION 5,679,249 6,256,469 4,170,220 33% -WATER, SANITATION 7,273,860 9,852,448 3,780,397 6,072,051 38% -AND HYGIENETotal Emergency 30,316,969 39,995,965 8,981,102 32,504,863 22% -Revision projectsHaiti CAP – 200,227,853 111,084,845 46,755,614 62,839,231 42% 612,745non revised projectsGrand Total 2012 CAP 230,544,822 151,080,810 55,736,716 95,344,094 37% 612,745NOTE: "Funding" means Contributions + Commitments + Carry-overContribution: the actual payment of funds or transfer of in-kind goods from the donor to the recipient entity.Commitment: creation of a legal, contractual obligation between the donor and recipient entity, specifying the amount to be contributed.Pledge: a non-binding announcement of an intended contribution or allocation by the donor. ("Uncommitted pledge" on these tables indicates the balance of original pledges not yet committed.)The list of projects and the figures for their funding requirements in this document are a snapshot as of 10 November 2012. Forcontinuously updated information on projects, funding requirements, and contributions to date, visit the Financial Tracking Service(fts.unocha.org). 3
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012Table II: Requirements and funding to date perorganization in the Emergency Revision Consolidated Appeal for Haiti 2012 – Emergency Revision for Hurricane Sandy as of 10 November 2012 http://fts.unocha.org Compiled by OCHA on the basis of information provided by donors and appealing organizations.Appealing Original Revised Funding Unmet % Uncommittedorganization requirements requirements requirements Covered pledges ($) ($) ($) ($) ($) A B C D=B-C E=C/B FACF - 700,000 - 700,000 0% -ACTED - 845,000 - 845,000 0% -ActionAid - 200,000 - 200,000 0% -AMECON 2000 - 500,000 - 500,000 0% -CARE USA - 603,004 - 603,004 0% -CRS - 1,000,000 - 1,000,000 0% -FADA - 601,975 - 601,975 0% -FAO 10,000,000 4,500,000 1,893,191 4,096,809 42% -FHED-INC - 191,555 - 191,555 0% -HI - 353,813 - 353,813 0% -IOM - 3,220,385 - 3,220,385 0% -Malteser International 430,404 215,202 215,202 - 100% -OPREM-F - 400,000 - 400,000 0% -Solidarités - 100,000 - 100,000 0% -UN-HABITAT - 236,000 - 236,000 0% -UNICEF 14,253,109 14,030,036 6,520,966 7,509,070 46% -UNOPS 4,433,456 5,124,174 199,855 4,924,319 4% -WFP - 5,883,000 - 5,883,000 0% -WHO 1,200,000 941,821 151,888 789,933 16% -WVI - 350,000 - 350,000 0% -Total Emergency 30,316,969 39,995,965 8,981,102 31,014,863 22% -RevisionNOTE: "Funding" means Contributions + Commitments + Carry-overContribution: the actual payment of funds or transfer of in-kind goods from the donor to the recipient entity.Commitment: creation of a legal, contractual obligation between the donor and recipient entity, specifying the amount to be contributed.Pledge: a non-binding announcement of an intended contribution or allocation by the donor. ("Uncommitted pledge" on these tables indicates the balance of original pledges not yet committed.) 4
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 20122. CONTEXT AND HUMANITARIAN CONSEQUENCES2.1 ContextAlthough Haiti was not directly in Hurricane Sandy’s path, the storm triggered heavy rains and severeflooding in the West, South, Grand’Anse, Nippes and South-East Departments. Of the country’s 140communes, 70 were affected by the storm. Water levels are receding, but several areas remaininaccessible due to damaged bridges and highways.Haitian authorities and humanitarian actors were quick to respond to the needs identified. To date,assessments have been carried out in all affected communes and departments. Distributions ofmattresses, sleeping bags, hygiene kits and food rations have been carried out (see Response to date,below).Hurricane Sandy’s Impact (as of 23- 27 October 2012) TS Sandy’s impact Port-de-Paix NORD-OUEST Cap-Haitien Fort-Liberté NORD Blocked road reported NORD-EST Gonaives Landslide areas Areas affected by TS Sandy ARTIBONITE Road Hinche CENTRE Jérémie Port-au-Prince GRANDE -ANSE Miragoane OUEST NIPPES SUD SUD-EST Jacmel CayesAlthough main ports, airports, fuel storage facilities and electricity plants were spared major damage,there are serious concerns regarding key parts of the road network. Humanitarian organizations havesufficient transport and storage capacity, but road access to certain affected areas of the southernpeninsula (Grand’Anse and South Departments), near the Dominican border (Fond Verrets in WestDepartment) and in Baie D’Orange and Mapou in the South-East Department remains limited. Inparticular, it is paramount that a quick and stable solution is found for the repair of the Port–au-Princeto Malpasse road, one of the main arteries of the country.22 Infrastructure repair falls outside the scope of this appeal but international partners are encouraged to continue supporting theMinistry of Public Works (MoPW) to continue their quick road repair. Road repairs will also contribute in resuming the normalflow of economic exchanges and in facilitating market access for farmers. 5
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012 Bridge destroyed in Arcahaie (West) Road destroyed by the rising of sea water in the South department2.2 Response to dateThe Haitian Government released an emergency budget allocation of HTG 350 million ($8.4 million)for immediate life-saving response while humanitarian partners also provided assistance (see furtherdetails below). However, in-country resources are increasingly strained. For humanitarian partners,severe underfunding of the 2012 Consolidated Appeal has reduced emergency response capacity inthe country. Many of the critical needs resulting from the devastating passage of Sandy cannotcurrently be met. The table below reflects a number of interventions by the international communityin support of Government response efforts: Cluster/Sector Activities CCCM/ Preparedness activities Emergency  224 camps, comprising 64,812 families (69% of the camp population), were sensitized on shelter preparedness specifically for Hurricane Sandy. All camps sensitized on hurricane preparedness in general since the beginning of the hurricane season.  18 partners supported emergency activities in camps before and after the storm (type of activities: sensitization, evaluations, non-food item (NFI) support, response intervention). Coordination of assessments  300 camps, hosting 73% of the camp population, were contacted by telephone for initial assessments.  Field evaluations conducted of 184 camps in order to verify the initial telephone assessments.  Findings of field evaluations (as of 4 November 2012) - 115 camps (21% of the existing camps), housing 39,811 families, affected by the rains reporting mostly flooding, health-related issues, damages to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and shelter facilities. - 76 of the camps affected by Sandy were also affected by Isaac. - At least 5,200 emergency shelters, housing 21,840 people, in 88 camps, were destroyed or seriously damaged by the storm. - 676 additional families identified as in need of NFI and cholera-related items. Emergency response in camps  8,134 tarpaulins distributed as of 4 November, representing 65% coverage of urgent needs; remaining shelter needs will be covered in the following weeks.  Distribution of cholera-related items in 51 camps. Food Security  Distribution of emergency food kits and High Energy Biscuits (HEBs) in temporary and Nutrition shelters reached more than 15,000 people (South, Nippes, South-East, West, Artibonite, Nippes and North-West Departments).  5.6 metric tons (MTs) of HEBs and 0.74 MTs of mixed commodities distributed via World Food Programme (WFP) and partners such as International Organization for Migration (IOM), Catholic Relief Services (CRS), CARITAS, Directorate for Civil Protection (DPC), Haitian Red Cross.  Food kits have been provided by CRS, World Vision International (WVI), DPC, Ministry of 6
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012 Social Affairs.  Technical and logistical support provided to the Government to enhance monitoring of the nutritional status of children under five.  Eight tents provided to replace severe acute malnutrition (SAM) treatment centres.  Vitamin A capsules and de-worming tablets as well as technical and financial support provided to the Government for children under five. Health  Evacuation of patients from the Immaculate Conception Hospital in Camp Perrin in the South Department.  Handicap International (HI) donated two tents to replace a cholera treatment centre in the Nippes department.  World Health Organization (WHO) field teams deployed in 10 departments to evaluate the number of cases appearing after the storm. WASH  Evaluation of WASH needs in 71 affected communes out of 72.  Distribution of more than 11,000 hygiene kits for all highly vulnerable families (those who have lost all their items).  Provision of water and sanitation in 30 emergency shelters out of 136.  Hygiene promotion campaigns targeting all highly vulnerable families and neighbourhoods.  United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS) cholera response teams have reached through mass sensitization of 3,031people and 1,222 door-to-door sensitizations since Sandy. Education  100 school tents for 8,000 students to be distributed to enable damaged schools to continue functioning (ongoing).  40,000 affected students’ lost materials will be replaced by United Nations Childrens Fund (UNICEF) ongoing school kit distribution. Logistics  International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) carried out three reconnaissance flights in the affected areas.  United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) assistance to assessment teams through special helicopter flights. Mitigation  UNOPS support to the Ministry of Public Works to mitigate additional flooding risk in the areas of 4th Avenue, Carrefour (Zone de Mariani) and Cité Soleil. Actions taken: canal cleaning; water passages to stop houses from flooding, and debris removal.  A needs evaluation in the metropolitan area of Port-au-Prince and in the South Department was carried out; various areas at risk of flooding and major infrastructure damage in roads and bridges were identified. Government  HTG 350 million ($8.4 million) allocated for assistance to the affected population. of Haiti  Distribution of 36,800 food parcels and 20,000 food kits by the Prime Minister’s office.  Cholera treatment supplies were provided by the Ministry of Health in Artibonite.  Delivery of 25,000 hot meals and 40,000 bottles of water.  61,000 emergency vouchers will be distributed.2.3 Funding to dateAs of 10 November, humanitarian funding received against the 2012 CAP stood at $55.7 millionrepresenting only 37% of the critical humanitarian requirements identified. Shortfalls inhumanitarian funding throughout 2011 and 2012 have reduced response capacities to the extent thatthere is insufficient capacity under current conditions to meet the additional humanitarian needsresulting from Hurricane Sandy. This Emergency Revision seeks to mobilize additional fundingneeded to meet these requirements.The Emergency Relief and Response Fund (ERRF) for Haiti remains ERRF contactopen and may serve as a channel to allocate contributions against this Salvator Bijojoteappeal. Appeal projects for cholera response will be targeted for ERRF Email: salvator@un.org Tel: +509 3702-576allocations. 7
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 20123. HUMANITARIAN CONSEQUENCES AND NEEDS ANALYSISThe hurricane has generated a number of critical humanitarian needs. The impact on the agriculturalsector is a priority. In August, Tropical Storm Isaac destroyed some 40% of the harvest,compounding the effect of drought earlier in the year. Sandy then devastated agricultural lands in thesouth that Isaac had not affected, with over 90,000 hectares of agricultural land and crops in at least60 of the country’s 140 communes destroyed.3 The combined impact is alarming, with 1.5 millionseverely food insecure, and up to 450,000 people, including at least 4,000 children estimated to be atrisk of severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Destroyed Damaged A second area of concern is shelter. According to data Department houses houses collected by the DPC, 27,701 homes were either damaged Grande- or destroyed (see table). Out of the estimated 31,370 2,386 3,492 Anse people who lost their houses, the majority are now living Sud-Est 1,299 4,522 with host families or in improvised accommodations, Sud 1,062 8,995 while 2,949 are still living in 18 hurricane shelters. Nippes 1,037 2,242 Another 5,298 earthquake-displaced people in camps were Ouest 443 1,788 also left homeless by Sandy and are in the process of Artibonite 33 144 being assisted with emergency shelter distributions. Nord-Ouest 12 50 Centre 2 A number of critical public buildings and infrastructure 194 Nord 0 were severely damaged by the storm. As of 31 October, 0 Nord-Est 0 0 150 schools were destroyed or damaged, resulting in 100 TOTAL 6,274 21,427 schools being closed and which will require assistance to reopen. This affects an estimated 20,000 children. Healthstructures were also affected: 22 cholera treatment facilities were destroyed by Sandy, in addition tothe 39 facilities damaged by Tropical Storm Isaac, which have not yet been repaired. 30 potablewater supply systems were also damaged, affecting 830,000 people. An increase in cholera cases isbeing reported in the South and South-East Departments and there are fears of further outbreaks.Mitigation and clean up works will be required in camps, hurricane shelters and affected areas to re-establish decent living conditions3 Government of Haiti, Situation report No 8. 8
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 20124. CLUSTER RESPONSE PLANS4.1 Food security and NutritionLosses caused by Tropical Storm Sandy in the agricultural sector are estimated at $104 million.According to the National Committee for Food Security (CNSA), 1.5 million people in facing severe foodinsecurity, due to the loss of crops and livelihoods; at least 4,000 children under five are at risk of severeacute malnutrition.Immediate interventions required include prompt food rations to most affected populations; cash/foodfor work for households at highest risk of food insecurity; voucher distributions for the most vulnerable(disabled, elderly, etc.); key nutrition interventions for victims of severe acute malnutrition as well as forchildren at risk of malnutrition; and provision of agricultural inputs to allow immediate re-planting.Background and needs analysisThe combined impact of the drought earlier in 2012, Tropical Storm Isaac, and now Hurricane Sandyon the food security situation in Haiti has been devastating, with 1.5 million people, in 92 out of thecountry’s 140 communes, facing a situation of severe food insecurity. 4 5 This situation led theGovernment to decree a state of emergency on 30 October.. Maize farm completely flooded in Les Cayes (Sud) - Banana farm flooded in Jeremie (Grande-Anse)Evaluations carried out after the drought and Tropical Storm Isaac revealed that almost 50% ofcommunes, or 2.5 million people, were affected by food insecurity. Of these, an estimated 900,000people are severely food insecure. With the impact of Sandy, this number has increased to 1.5 million.There have been significant reductions in the availability of local food products, with consequentsignificant price increases (200% price increase in some communes were registered at the end ofSeptember 2012 compared to the prices in September 2011). By end of October 2012, cornproduction had declined by 42%; sorghum and rice by 33%; bananas by 37%; potatoes by 22% andvegetables by 6%. Commercial production of coffee, bananas, avocadoes, mangoes and oranges hasalso been severely affected. This has resulted in a greater dependence on imported food products andincreasing vulnerability to international price fluctuations.4 National Committee for Food Security (CNSA)5 A rapid food security assessment is on-going in the districts affected by Hurricane Sandy under the leadership of the CNSA. 9
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012Worsening an already serious situation, Sandy hit the few remaining productive areas in the country.The total losses are estimated at $104 million, mostly in the agricultural, fishing and pastoral sectors.The departments of Grand’Anse, Nippes, the South, the South-East, the West and the North-East areidentified as being the most affected areas, however the food crisis will affect the entire population.As a direct impact of the combined effects of the drought, Isaac and Sandy, the population in affectedareas is facing a triple threat of decreased job opportunities, reduced access to food and lessagricultural land to cultivate for the coming harvest season. Most vulnerable households havedepleted food stocks, at a time when the next harvest season is still months away (June 2013). Dry season and TS Isaac priority areas, prior to SandyThe household survey carried out in September 2012 by the CNSA found that up to 57% of ruralhouseholds were severely food-insecure.6 There is a high probability that households in areas affectedby the drought and by Isaac and Sandy are not meeting their basic calorific requirements. A worryingdeterioration of the nutritional status for the most vulnerable (children under five, lactating/pregnantwomen, the elderly and disabled, people living with AIDS) is likely. Preventive measures aretherefore increasingly urgent.Households interviewed prior to Sandy, in September-October 2012, were already relying on negativecoping mechanisms such as the sale of productive assets, increased wood cutting to produce charcoal(especially fruit trees), increased dependency on credit for food purchase, decreased number andquality of meals, reduction in school enrolment, and increased migration to urban areas. Non-agricultural employment opportunities are even more limited than before, in particular in rural areas.In addition, the fishing community has also been badly affected by Sandy.6 National Study on Food Security 10
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012Food Security response plan Objectives Results expected Key activities BeneficiariesReady to eat food to Improved food consumption over Distribution of HEBs 15,000 peoplesupport households in assistance period for targeted and food kits. (3,000temporary shelters. emergency-affected households in families) temporary shelters.Emergency food aid to Improved food consumption over Provision of in-kind 100,000support worst affected assistance period for targeted food assistance in the peoplefamilies who lost their emergency-affected households. form of dry rations - (20,000homes (totally/partially each covering 21 days families)destroyed/badly affected). for a family of five people.Immediate cash / income Strengthened food purchasing Cash/FfW activities in 90,000 peoplesafety net provided to power over assistance period for the form of high (18,000worst affected rural targeted emergency-affected Intensity labour families)households. households at risk of falling into programmes. Assets to acute hunger due to loss of income. be rehabilitated Support to rehabilitation of key identified and prioritized infrastructure for the poor rural with local communities. farmers.Immediate unconditional Adequate food consumption over Provision of N/Aassistance to most assistance period for targeted unconditionalvulnerable populations emergency-affected households at vouchers/cash for worst(status based: risk of falling into acute hunger. affected people whohandicapped, disabled, are already extremelyelderly, etc.). vulnerable (handicapped, elderly, etc.).Improve the food security 20,000 emergency-affected Provision of agricultural 100,000situation of affected households at risk of falling into materials (seeds and peoplefamilies through food insecurity have access to tools and small scale (20,000agricultural production. agricultural inputs and produce their livestock) through families) own food. vouchers. 11
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012Nutrition response plan Objectives Results expected Key activities Beneficiaries Prevent child malnutrition and Children under five suffering from Conduct early 1,000 children treat severe acute cases SAM have access to timely and identification and under five for effectively effective care. referral of children SAM with SAM. Pregnant and lactating women Ensure availability 12,000 have access to 16 counselling on of essential children under optimal infant feeding practices. commodities and five for equipment, diarrhoea including Children under five and women information have access to essential education and 8,300 children micronutrients. communication and 25,000 (IEC) tools. women for micronutrients Children suffering from diarrhoea Organize training receive adequate treatment. sessions for health and community Health and community workers’ workers. capacity is strengthened to ensure Organize 16 effective delivery of services. counselling sessions for lactating women. Distribute micronutrients to children and women. Prevention of a nutrition crisis Improved nutritional status of Nutritional 100,000 through targeted supplementary targeted children 6–59 months preventive support people feeding and preventive and of pregnant and lactating and targeted (including nutritional support. women, through targeted supplementary children under supplementary feeding/preventive feeding to treat five and support. moderate acute pregnant and malnutrition among lactating children aged 6–59 women) months and pregnant and lactating women as well as tuberculosis (TB) and anti- retroviral therapy (ART) patients. 12
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 20124.2 CCCM and ShelterHurricane Sandy destroyed 6,274 houses and damaged a further 21,427 according to the DPC. Out of theestimated 31,370 people who lost their houses, the majority are now living with host families or inimprovised accommodations, while 2,949 are still living in 18 hurricane shelters. Of these, at least 2,300are unable to return to their place of origin because their houses and/or lands have been destroyed bythe storm.Immediate Shelter and CCCM interventions will include: the distribution of repair and reconstruction kits,technical support and training, restocking of non-food items (NFIs), the provision of basic essentialservices for the 2,949 people still living in evacuation shelters, and mitigation and disaster risk reduction(DRR) works in affected areas.Background and needs analysis 1. Housing sectorA thorough field assessment conducted by E-Shelter and CCCM Cluster partners will be required toverify the damages estimated by the DPC at the time of the initial rapid assessment and to determinewhether reconstruction and repairs can take place, whether mitigation and DRR works are neededand/or whether relocation options are available.Once the assessments are completed, E-Shelter and CCCM Cluster partners will proceed with thedistribution of repair and reconstruction kits, accompanied by technical support, training andcommunications tools to promote a safer and sturdier reconstruction and repair process. In somecases, particularly in rural areas, it transitional shelters may be necessary, and in urban areas rentalsubsidies may be required. The Shelter support strategy will need to maintain a certain level offlexibility to adapt to the evolving needs on the ground. Partners will seek to integrate Shelterassistance with livelihood, agriculture and WASH activities. Damaged house in Marfranc /Jeremie (Grand Anse) 13
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012 2. At risk campsHeavy rains generated important flooding in camps causing the destruction of thousands of dwellingsand tents. Overall, 5,200 emergency shelters were destroyed in 88 camps. 78 out of the 115 campsaffected by Sandy were also affected by Isaac. Camps affected by ISAAC (218) Camps affected by both storms (78) Camps affected By SANDY (115) Source: IOMTo minimize the number of vulnerable IDPs exposed to floods and landslides the 115 campsidentified by Government as being most at risk will be prioritized for return projects, particularlyusing the rental subsidy approach.Immediate needs in camps include: (1) re-stocking contingency NFIs to replace those distributedafter the two storm crises in 2012 (Isaac and Sandy) and (2) mitigation and DRR works in and aroundthe most affected camps and areas of return, to ensure safe living conditions. 3. Evacuation shelters Number of A preventative evacuation of 19,000 at-risk people was People in hurricane organized by national authorities as Hurricane Sandy Department hurricane shelters approached (this number included 1,250 extremely shelters operational vulnerable IDPs evacuated from at-risk camps in Port-au- West 2,682 10 Prince). As of 31 October 2012, 2,949 individuals remain South-East 267 8 in 18 evacuation shelters scattered across the West and Total 2,949 18 South-East departments, according to information provided by the DPC. Of these, 2,298 people (78%) are believed tobe without return solutions, as their houses and/or land were washed away by the floods. Thesepeople are in need of immediate basic assistance including NFIs, clean water, basic sanitation andhygiene items. They will also need shelter assistance to return to their communities of origin orrelocate to a new area. 14
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012Shelter and CCCM response planObjectives Results expected Key activities BeneficiariesImmediate humanitarian 11,274 families who had their Provision of host 11,274assistance to 11,274 families homes destroyed or damaged family support, cash familieswho had their houses lost or receive host family support, cash grants for (approximatelydestroyed grants for reconstruction and/or reconstruction and/or 56,370 rent, construction of shelters rent, construction of people) sheltersBasic services for families in 2,949 people in evacuation Provision of essential 2,949 peopleevacuation shelters (duration: shelters receive basic services NFIs, shelter (approximatelytwo months) (duration: two months) maintenance, 580 families) security, WASH and health-related servicesSmall mitigation works Essential small mitigation and Cash for work, N/A clean up works in camps and provision of basic areas and neighbourhoods badly tools, equipment and affected by the storm are carried machinery to support out the beneficiaries if requiredReplenishment of contingency Contingency stocks for 9,000 Hygiene and kitchen 9,000 familiesstocks families are replenished kits, tarps, mosquito (approximately nets etc. are 45,000 provided for stocks people) Total beneficiaries 20,854 families 15
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 20124.3 Health and WASHIncreased numbers of cholera cases are being reported in various areas in the aftermath of Sandy whileresponse capacities are limited. 22 cholera treatment facilities were destroyed by the storm. Damage to30 potable water supply systems is a further concern. Immediate interventions required include therehabilitation of the 22 damaged cholera facilities, the pre-positioning of medical stocks to treat 10,000potential victims and the rehabilitation of the 30 water supply systems.Background and needs analysis Health systemDespite a significant decline in the incidence of cholera infections and fatalities in 2012 the choleraepidemic continues and the risk of outbreaks remains acute. With the passage of Tropical Storm Isaacand now Hurricane Sandy, several new outbreaks have been recorded by the national alert system,creating a spike in new cholera cases and fatalities. Between 28 October and 8 November 3,593 newcases of cholera were recorded. This is against a backdrop of previously increased infection rates:8,228 cases of cholera were recorded in October, in comparison to 7,500 in September.Some isolated areas in the country have been difficult to reach due to flooding following HurricaneSandy. Aerial transportation has been needed to respond to localized cholera outbreaks. The increaseof patients in treatment centres has required a draw-down of pre-positioned medical supplies ingovernment warehouses at departmental level. New materials are urgently needed to replenish stocksto respond to continuing anticipated caseload and outbreaks. Hurricane Sandy destroyed 22 choleratreatment facilities in the South, South East, Grand’Anse and West Departments. This compounds thedifficulties caused by the prior destruction of 39 facilities by Isaac, which had not yet been repaired. Exacerbating response challenges, over recent months there has been a sharp decrease in the number of international actors involved in the cholera response, while Government capacity to respond to cholera outbreaks faces important limitations. Thus, immediate financing is required for humanitarian partners to fill critical gaps in response.Les Cayes Hospital inaccessible as a result of flooding 16
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012 WASHThe 2,298 people still living in emergency shelters are in need of clean water, basic sanitation andaccess to basic hygiene items. the National Directorate for Potable Water and Sanitation (DINEPA)and WASH partners distributed approximately 4,000 hygiene kits to these people and are providingWASH services in 30 out of the 136 emergency shelters. Damage to WASH infrastructure has beenidentified across the country, with 30 water supply systems were damaged throughout the South,Grande Anse, Nippes and West Departments. In a country lacking basic sanitation of sewageinfrastructure, these systems are in need of immediate rehabilitation. Works will be implemented byDINEPA, with support from the UNICEF and other WASH partners.The drastic reduction in safe water coverage after Sandy as a result of the destruction of these watersupply systems sharply increases the risk of exposure to water-borne diseases. The localizedoutbreaks of cholera cases reported so far attest to heightened risks. Immediate measures are neededto protect and restore drinking water sources and to improve sanitation, as well as to restoredamaged and destroyed cholera treatment facilities. In addition, both for short-term shelter solutionsand in housing reconstruction, ensuring access to latrines and other basic sanitation facilities isessential.Additional contingency stocks are urgently required to deal with cholera outbreaks and emergenciesfor the remaining weeks of the hurricane season and to replenish severely depleted stocks. Finally,immediate support to the WASH Sector information management and coordination capacities ofDINEPA has to be maintained. Source: Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) 17
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012Health response planObjectives Results expected Key activities BeneficiariesIncrease capacities - 61 damaged - Support to the reconstruction of 61 10,000 peopleto respond to new cholera treatment damaged cholera treatment facilities.cholera cases. facilities are - Support Ministry of Health in rehabilitated, integrating cholera centres into the including 22 public health system. affected by Sandy - Support affectedcholera treatment and 39 affected by facilities through distributions of key Isaac. materials, mainly in areas with no or - 17,000 new difficult access. potential cholera - Provision of medical materials for cases can receive about 10,000 potential cholera cases, treatment. and pre-positioning of stock in risk areas. - Support the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) alert mechanism to coordinate the response at department level and the epidemiological monitoring of the health situation through its field teams. - Improving the water and sanitation situation in cholera treatment facilities. - Health promotion campaigns in affected communities.WASH response planObjectives Results expected Key activities BeneficiariesMitigate cholera Access to safe WASH is - Detailed assessment of cost of repairand other water- improved for all of WASH infrastructures damaged byborne diseases populations affected by Hurricane Sandy.amongst Hurricane Sandy.populations - Rehabilitation of 30 water supplyaffected by systems.Hurricane Sandy. 750,000 - Decontamination/ repair of water people sources and wells. - Desludging, maintenance and rehabilitation of latrines in flooded public buildings and emergency shelters. Technical support to affected families to access sanitation. - Provision of emergency response supplies (hygiene kits, jerry cans, etc.). - Hygiene and sanitation campaigns and distribution of hygiene promotion material.Reinforcement of Reinforcement of - Reinforcement of the capacities of the Nationwideemergency coordination and National Observatory and Emergencycapacities to information management Response Department of DINEPAcoordinate and in the WASH Sector. through coaching.respond toHurricane Sandy. - Support to coordination. - Reinforcement of SISKLOR SMS water quality monitoring system. 18
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012 4.4 EducationHurricane Sandy had a severe impact on basic public infrastructure: aside from health and waterfacilities, 150 schools and several key roads and bridges were damaged or destroyed. An infrastructurerecovery response plan is being developed by the Government and will be released shortly.Background and needs analysis The storm caused significant damage to public and private Number of schools destroyed or damaged schools in southern Haiti, many of which were constructed Department Destroyed Damaged in a makeshift manner using basic materials including Grand’Anse 23 12 tarpaulins and banana leaves. The initial Government South-East 10 30 assessment report suggests that more than 100 permanent or South 9 20 semi-permanent schools were damaged and more than 50 Nippes 7 18 light–structured schools were destroyed (see table). Where West 0 20 school infrastructures were not damaged, flooding damaged Total 49 100 the teaching and learning materials of more than 500schools throughout the country. The majority of affected rural schools do not have water andsanitation facilities exposing students and teachers to cholera risks. A flooded school in Les Cayes (South Department)The Ministry of Education and its partners have proposed a two-fold response strategy: ■ Immediate: repair damaged schools and set up temporary learning spaces with temporary measures, using tarpaulins, tents and tin sheets, targeting the schools which have not been able to re-open or properly function. ■ Medium-term: rehabilitate the destroyed schools with light-structured temporary learning schools in order to better resist cyclones. 19
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012 Destroyed temporary school structures in South-eastEducation response planObjectives Results expected Key activities BeneficiariesTo support the - 100 schools - Repair and rehabilitate 100 20,000continuation of rehabilitated or repaired. damaged or destroyed schools students andschooling in a safer - 50,000 students and with tin sheets, tarpaulins and 500 teachersenvironment for 1,250 teachers who lost tents. 50,000approximately their teaching and - Rehabilitate 40 schools with light students50,000 students learning materials semi-structured temporary 1,250 teacherswhose schooling receive textbooks, other learning spaces.has been materials, aquatabs and - Distribute teaching and learning 30,000interrupted because soap. materials to replace those studentsof damages caused - Students in 150 schools destroyed. 30,000by Hurricane in cholera-affected - Distribute aquatabs and soap for studentsSandy. zones practice hand schools to prevent the spread of washing with soap. cholera. - Set up hand washing stations in schools which have no water in the affected zones. 20
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 20125. Contacts Haiti Government Ministry of the Interior and Local Government H.E. Minister Leon Ronsard leonronsard@yahoo.com Directorate of Civil Protection Director Jean-Baptiste Alta altajeanbaptiste@yahoo.com International Humanitarian Community Nigel Fisher Johan Peleman Humanitarian Coordinator Head of OCHA – Haiti fishern@un.org peleman@un.org +509 3702 9079 +509 3702 8746 21
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012ANNEX I: LIST OF PROJECTS Consolidated Appeal for Haiti 2012 – Emergency Revision for Hurricane Sandy as of 10 November 2012 http://fts.unocha.org Compiled by OCHA on the basis of information provided by donors and appealing organizations.Project code Title Appealing Original Revised Funding Unmet %(click on hyperlinked project code agency requirements requirements requirements Coveredto open full project details) ($) ($) ($) ($)AGRICULTURE Intervention d’urgence dans le secteur de l’élevage et l’agriculture dansHTI-12/A/45480/R/123 les départements de la Grande Anse, de lOuest, des Nippes et du Sud, FAO 8,000,000 4,500,000 1,106,821 3,393,179 25% affectés par les inondationsHTI-12/A/51444/R/14558 Projet de soutien rapide aux éleveurs victimes du cyclone ISAAC et OPREM-F - 400,000 - 400,000 0% Sandy dans la commune de LéoganeHTI-12/A/56883/R/13790 Support Agriculture to foster AKA Culture Farmers Association in 11 FHED-INC - 95,049 - 95,049 0% Communal Section of Gros Morne, Léogane Projet d’appui à la conservation du sol de terres cultivable inondéeHTI-12/A/56885/R/14556 autour de la rivière de BAINET (8eme section oranger, 5eme bras FADA - 115,305 - 115,305 0% grandou et 7eme bras gauche)HTI-12/A/56896/R/13244 Assistance Agricole aux familles des sections communales de 1ère et AMECON - 500,000 - 500,000 0% 2ème Balan sévèrement touchées par le Cyclone Sandy 2000Total for AGRICULTURE 10,000,000 5,610,354 1,893,191 5,207,163 33%CAMP COORDINATION AND CAMP MANAGEMENT (CCCM) AND SHELTERHTI-12/CSS/45500/R/5767 Emergency preparedness and mitigation response for targeted and UNOPS 2,520,574 3,034,174 - 3,034,174 0% vulnerable communities of Haiti 22
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012Project code Title Appealing Original Revised Funding Unmet %(click on hyperlinked project code agency requirements requirements requirements Coveredto open full project details) ($) ($) ($) ($) Projet de réparations de 200 maisons endommagées dans cinq (5)HTI-12/S-NF/56865/R/14556 communes (Mapou, Bainet, Thiotte, Les Anglais, Harniquet) et dune FADA - 268,570 - 268,570 0% assistance technique pour la reconstruction de 300 maisons détruitesHTI-12/S-NF/56878/R/5349 Amélioration des conditions de vie de 300 familles vulnérables affectées HI - 353,813 - 353,813 0% par le passage de la tempête SandyHTI-12/S-NF/56880/R/298 Humanitarian and shelter response to Hurricane Sandy IOM - 3,220,385 - 3,220,385 0%HTI-12/S-NF/56886/R/6458 Emergency shelter assistance to vulnerable population affected by ACTED - 845,000 - 845,000 0% hurricane Sandy Appui technique et communication sur la réparation et réhabilitation desHTI-12/S-NF/56888/R/7039 logements post-cyclone pour l’amélioration des practices de construction UN-HABITAT - 236,000 - 236,000 0% paracycloniqueHTI-12/S-NF/56894/R/5585 Emergency response and NFI response to Sandy CARE USA - 603,004 - 603,004 0%Total for CAMP COORDINATION AND CAMP MANAGEMENT (CCCM) AND SHELTER 2,520,574 8,560,946 - 8,560,946 0%EDUCATIONHTI-12/E/45181/R/124 Quality basic education for vulnerable children in disaster affected areas UNICEF 1,300,000 1,289,119 654,320 634,799 51% and host communities in HaitiHTI-12/E/51211/R/14556 Construction de 26 structures de lavages des mains dans 26 écoles du FADA - 181,800 - 181,800 0% SUD et SUD EST frappées par louragan SANDYHTI-12/E/56838/R/5511 Safe Learning environment for children post-Hurricane Sandy ActionAid - 200,000 - 200,000 0% Fostering Wash promotion in 118 Destroyed and Damaged Schools byHTI-12/E/56871/R/13790 Sandy Hurricane in The West, South East, Nippes, South and FHED-INC - 96,506 - 96,506 0% GrandAnse of HaitiTotal for EDUCATION 1,300,000 1,767,425 654,320 1,113,105 37%FOOD AIDHTI-12/ER/56902/R/8502 Cash-for-work to support urban livelihoods in Ouest department following WVI - 350,000 - 350,000 0% Sandy 23
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012Project code Title Appealing Original Revised Funding Unmet %(click on hyperlinked project code agency requirements requirements requirements Coveredto open full project details) ($) ($) ($) ($) Immediate food assistance and cash safety net for most vulnerable ruralHTI-12/F/56899/R/561 households affected by the combined effects of the drought and WFP - 3,715,000 - 3,715,000 0% Isaac/Sandy HurricaneHTI-12/F/56900/R/5186 Integrated response for vulnerable population affected by food insecurity ACF - 500,000 - 500,000 0% due to the combined effects of the drought and Isaac/Sandy HurricaneHTI-12/F/56901/R/5146 Recovery from Hurricane Sandy in Southern Haiti CRS - 1,000,000 - 1,000,000 0%Total for FOOD AID - 5,565,000 - 5,565,000 0%HEALTH Assuring current and future care to cholera patients and preventing theHTI-12/H/45193/R/7560 Malteser disease on community level by provision of a sustainable treatment 430,404 215,202 215,202 - 100% International structureHTI-12/H/45446/R/122 Implementation of Multi-hazard Alert and Response System WHO 1,200,000 941,821 151,888 789,933 16%HTI-12/H/45498/R/5767 Immediate basic WASH response to cholera outbreaks in Haiti UNOPS 1,912,882 1,190,000 199,855 990,145 17%HTI-12/H/51270/R/14556 Implantation dun centre de traitement de cholera dans le centre de sante FADA - 36,300 - 36,300 0% de marcher CANA a MirbalaisTotal for HEALTH 3,543,286 2,383,323 566,945 1,816,378 24%NUTRITIONHTI-12/H/45168/R/124 Emergency Nutrition Services (preparedness and response) UNICEF 5,679,249 4,088,469 2,086,249 2,002,220 51% Nutritional Supplementary/Preventive Response targeting affectedHTI-12/H/56898/R/561 women/children low 5 years due to the combined effects of the drought WFP - 2,168,000 - 2,168,000 0% and Isaac and Sandy Hurricane.Total for NUTRITION 5,679,249 6,256,469 2,086,249 4,170,220 33%WATER, SANITATION AND HYGIENEHTI-12/WS/45152/R/124 UNICEF WASH Emergency and Recovery in Haiti UNICEF 7,273,860 8,652,448 3,780,397 4,872,051 44% 24
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012Project code Title Appealing Original Revised Funding Unmet %(click on hyperlinked project code agency requirements requirements requirements Coveredto open full project details) ($) ($) ($) ($)HTI-12/WS/51312/R/5767 Decentralisation DINEPA trucks in the Regions and Immediate basic UNOPS - 900,000 - 900,000 0% WASH response to cholera outbreaks in Haiti Rapid response to initial WASH needs of residents of a dozenHTI-12/WS/56879/R/5186 displacement camps affected by hurricane SANDY in the communes of ACF - 200,000 - 200,000 0% Port-au-Prince, Delmas and Cité Soleil. Réponse rapide aux flambées de choléra suite au passage de l’ouraganHTI-12/WS/56882/R/5633 SANDY dans 32 sites de déplacés de Pétion Ville, Delmas et Port au Solidarités - 100,000 - 100,000 0% PrinceTotal for WATER, SANITATION AND HYGIENE 7,273,860 9,852,448 3,780,397 6,072,051 38%Total for Emergency Revision 30,316,969 39,995,965 8,981,102 32,504,863 22%NOTE: "Funding" means Contributions + Commitments + Carry-overContribution: the actual payment of funds or transfer of in-kind goods from the donor to the recipient entity.Commitment: creation of a legal, contractual obligation between the donor and recipient entity, specifying the amount to be contributed.Pledge: a non-binding announcement of an intended contribution or allocation by the donor. ("Uncommitted pledge" on these tables indicates the balance of original pledges not yet committed.)The list of projects and the figures for their funding requirements in this document are a snapshot as of 10 November 2012. For continuously updated information on projects, funding requirements, and contributions todate, visit the Financial Tracking Service (fts.unocha.org). 25
  • HAÏTI CAP FLASH APPEAL NOVEMBER 2012ANNEX II: ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONSART anti-retroviral therapyCCCM camp coordination and camp managementCfW cash for workCNSA Comité National de Sécurité Alimentaire (National Committee for Food Security)CRS Catholic Relief ServicesDCP Direction de la Protection Civile (Civil Protection Department)DINEPA Direction Nationale de lEau potable et de lAssainissement (National Directorate for Potable Water and Sanitation)DRR disaster risk reductionERRF Emergency Relief and Response FundFfW food for workHEB high energy biscuitHI Handicap InternationalHTG Haiti Gourde (Haitian currency)IOM International Organization for MigrationMoPW Ministry of Public WorksMoSA Ministry of Social AffairsMSPP Ministry of Public Health and PopulationMTs metric tonsNFI non-food itemNGO non-governmental organizationPAHO Pan-American Health OrganizationSAM severe acute malnutritionTB tuberculosisUCLBP LUnité de Construction de Logements et de Bâtiments PublicsUNICEF United Nations Children’s FundUNOPS United Nations Office for Project ServicesWASH water, sanitation and hygieneWFP World Food ProgrammeWHO World Health OrganizationWVI World Vision International 26
  • OFFICE FOR THE COORDINATION OF HUMANITARIAN AFFAIRS (OCHA) United Nations Palais des Nations New York, N.Y. 10017 1211 Geneva 10 USA Switzerland