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Business Writing Style Guide Your Writing Companion
 

Business Writing Style Guide Your Writing Companion

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The reference book is a comprehensive and easy to use reference book that answers all the frequently asked questions about business writing style. ...

The reference book is a comprehensive and easy to use reference book that answers all the frequently asked questions about business writing style.



Compact and user-friendly, covering all the right topics - with just the right amount of information to be helpful. This is precisely what you want, at your elbow, at the ready, when you can\'t for the life of you remember which bit of punctuation goes where. (Ruth Wajnryb, Author and Columnist)



Business today is more complex and changes at a faster pace than ever before. This trend will only accelerate in the future. In this environment, one of a CEO\'s most important tasks is to provide clarity to the company and its stakeholders. In doing so, the ability to communicate clearly is a critical skill. In the Business Writing Style Guide, you will find great insights into improving your written communication skills. I strongly recommend it to any serious business person. (Julian Segal, ex CEO of Incitec Pivot)



I have been searching A LOT of bookstores to find something that is an easy reference yet comprehensive enough to use for my writing and your book is just that - clear, simple, precise and relevant. So thank you for putting your book out there. (Anna Fowler, Lawyer)

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    Business Writing Style Guide Your Writing Companion Business Writing Style Guide Your Writing Companion Presentation Transcript

    • BusinessWritingSTYLE GUIDE HEADINGSBy Verne Ordman i
    • Business Writing Style GuideHEADINGSEnglishWriting.bizA division of Verne Ordman & Associates Pty LtdSuite 30335 Spring StreetBondi Junction NSW 2022Web: www.EnglishWriting.bizCopyright © 2011 Verne Ordman & Associates Pty LtdAll rights reserved. Reproduction or translation of any part of this work is unlawful. Requests for permission touse as sales promotions or for use in corporate training programs should be addressed to Verne Ordman &Associates Pty Ltd.ISBN 978-0-9805266-0-8Disclaimer: The Business Writing Style Guide is provided as a general guide only and does not claim to belegal advice. Readers should seek legal advice in relation to particular legal issues arising from their writing. i
    • ContentsHEADINGS 1Wording 2Parallel construct 3Case 4Spacing 5Punctuation 5 ii
    • This guide promotes… INDIVIDUAL consistency GROUP consistency ORGANIZATIONAL consistency iii
    • Do you have a style question?Please contact us E: sales@EnglishWriting.biz T: +612 9130 6856 W: www.EnglishWriting.biz iv
    • THE DECIMAL SYSTEM1 HEADING 1 1.1 Heading 2 1.2 Heading 2 HEADINGS 1.3 Heading 2 1.3.1 Heading 3 1.3.2 Heading 32 HEADING 1 2.1 Heading 2 2.2 Heading 2 2.3 Heading 2 2.3.1 Heading 3 2.3.2 Heading 3 2.3.2.1 Heading 4 2.3.2.2 Heading 4 2.3.2.3 Heading 4 1
    • HEADINGSWordingThe goal of headings and subheadings is to indicate the scope and structure of information in an outline. Theoutline of any document essentially becomes the document’s table of contents.You should take extra care when deciding on the final wording of a document’s headings and subheadings.There are two choices when deciding on the wording of headings, topic or talking headings.Topic headings Talking headingsTopic headings are short and are made up of a Talking (or meaningful) headings also identifyfew words only. They do nothing but identify the the topic, but in addition they cover what istopics of discussion. Topic headings are more said about the content. They are moreconventional, with many companies choosing descriptive, and their popularity is increasingthem for formal reports. as they promote scanability and readability. HIERARCHY OF TOPIC HEADINGS HOW COMPANIES CAN HELP THE PURPOSE ENVIRONMENT BACKGROUND Install water saving rainwater tanks Past situation Switch to energy saving light sensors Current situation Distribute waste reduction recycling bins DISCUSSION RECOMMENDATIONS CONCLUSION 2
    • HEADINGSDIRECT AND INDIRECT QUESTIONSDirect and indirect questions are often used effectively as talking headings.Direct questions actually pose a question. Where did the incident take place?Indirect questions sound like they’re questions, but they are statements.They don’t pose an actual question. Where the incident took placeParallel constructTo ensure you don’t violate a fundamental concept of balance, you need to check for parallel constructin all your headings. Parallel construct is achieved when all headings in the same level of the headinghierarchy are of the same grammatical construction. This means they are written as either all topic or alltalking headings. Mixing the different grammatical forms in the same heading level is usually viewed asviolating parallel construct.You can mix topic and talking headings within a document. For example, you can use topic headings forall Heading 1 level headings and use talking headings for Heading 2 level headings. 3
    • HEADINGSCaseThe readability of lower case letters is greater than that of capital letters. Therefore, it is recommendedthat instead of using full capitals for headings that are longer than half a line, you use title case[AMERICAN ENGLISH RULES] or sentence case [BRITISH ENGLISH RULES]. Use full capitals forbrief and higher order topic headings. A consistent approach is vital when writing headings.Even when using AMERICAN ENGLISH rules, it is recommended you use sentence case for headingsthat are direct or indirect questions, full sentences or phrases. This ensures a neater appearance.We have used sentence case for headings in our Style Guide.SENTENCE CASEWith sentence case, use capital letters for the first word, proper nouns and titles only.TITLE CASETitle case in writing occurs when each major word is a capital letter with the exception of shortprepositions (of, to in, for, on); coordinating conjunctions (and, but, or, for, nor, yet, so);subordinating conjunctions (after, although, if, unless, because); correlative conjunctions (both …and, either … or, neither … nor) and the articles the, a or an if they are not the first word. 4
    • HEADINGSCase Spacing Request for agenda items (sentence case) There are two options for line spacing around headings. You can consistently use a slightly Request for Agenda Items (title case) larger line space above headings than below them. Alternatively, and the preferred option for consistency purposes, is to use one line BACKGROUND INFORMATION (all capitals) space above and one line space below all headings except chapter headings. Background information (sentence case) Chapter headings should preferably begin at Background Information (title case) the top of a new page. The following is a suggested format. The fontPunctuation size will vary depending on your preferred typeface and font.Avoid using terminal punctuation (periods/full Heading 1 (chapter heading)stops or colons) in headings. However, when HEADING 2headings are written as direct questions, they Heading 3need to end with question marks. Heading 4 What does personal coaching involve? Heading 5 5
    • HEADINGSEXCEPTIONUse a colon to link a heading (or title) with a follow-on subheading (or subtitle). Used in this way,the colon shows a subordinate relationship between the heading and the subheading. When usedin a heading, an initial capital letter after the colon is recommended. Planning: A guide to planning for structure and content Editing: A guide to editing for style and presentation ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- Stage 1: Pre-program competency review Stage 2: Introduction to the rules of business writing Stage 3: Personal coaching and ongoing editorial support Stage 4: Program evaluation Stage 5: Reporting and recommendationsUse a colon after a heading or title when it is directly followed by related information. It is alsoacceptable to use a period (or full stop) instead of a colon. Lack of support for Widget: It appears that the Widget software system has little or no support from our internal Help Desk or the IT Department in general.Use an initial upper case letter after the colon when the text is a complete sentence (as is thecase in the above example). Use an initial lower case letter after the colon when the text is not acomplete sentence. Lack of support for Widget: little or no support from internal Help Desk or IT Department 6
    • Interested in eLearning?Business Writing eLearning Courseware for your company FLEXIBLE: Custom-design an online program or select a pre-designed program COMPATIBLE: SCORM compliant courseware to upload onto your LMS or use our system as your virtual system AFFORDABLE: One fixed price to purchase the courseware and no hidden charges – for unlimited users! VITAL: Business writing is a core business skill GUARANTEED: 100% money back guarantee! ACCREDITED: Designed by experts with industry endorsementW: www.EnglishWriting.bizT: +612 9130 6856E: sales@BusinessWriting.biz 7
    • Do you want to try before you buy? FREE CORPORATE TRIAL: Sign up now! E: sales@EnglishWriting.biz T: +612 9130 6856 W: www.EnglishWriting.biz 8
    • eLearning CoursewareONLINE COURSES: STYLISTIC CLARITY ONLINE COURSES: STRUCTURAL CLARITY COMMON GRAMMATICAL ERRORS PLANNING YOUR DOCUMENT WORD CHOICE AND SPELLING WRITING INTRODUCTIONS AND CLOSINGS PUNCTUATION AND CASE WRITING THE OUTLINE AND BODY SENTENCE CONSTRUCTION WRITING WITH TONE IN MIND LISTS AND BULLET POINTS SENTENCE SPRAWL AND PARAGRAPHS NUMBERS AND SYMBOLS LAYOUT AND VISUALSTUTORIALS: STYLISTIC CLARITY TUTORIALS: STRUCTURAL CLARITY GRAMMAR PAYROLL PROCEDURE PLAIN ENGLISH BUSINESS CASE OVERDUE ACCOUNT DISPUTEWRITING RESOURCES CHECKLISTS, NOTES, DOCUMENT TEMPLATES, EXAMPLE DOCUMENTS, GENERIC WORKSHEETS 9