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From Intermediate to Advanced -
Taking Vocabulary Skills to the Next Level


by Olga Galperin
ETAI, Jerusalem
July 14, 2010
Outline
• Word Frequency Curve
• Vocabulary Size and Coverage
• Language Chunks
• Teaching Language Chunks
• Sample Lesson...
Word Frequency Curve
        ,-./"012-345-"67"4"#!"8699617:;13<"013=>?"1@"?=1A-7"47<"
                             ;36B-7"...
Vocabulary Size and Coverage

                                        Density of
       Vocab. Size      % Coverage      U...
Find Someone Who...
1. hopes to make new contacts at the conference
2. thinks conference participants should do their
best...
Types of Language Chunks

• collocations (make contacts)
• idioms (keep abreast of)
• phrasal verbs (take in)
• fixed expre...
Recognizing Language Chunks
• phonological unity (said fast and all in one go):
  //make the most of your time//


• pragm...
Chunks and Single Items
          From the Top 2,000
'&!!"
'%!!"
'$!!"
'#!!"
'!!!"
 &!!"
 %!!"
 $!!"
 #!!"
   !"




     ...
The 6,000 to 10,000 word band


• Chunks are salient
• Chunks become semantically opaque, or idiomatic
• Same word can hav...
Advanced Level Vocabulary
• develops in breadth (linear increase) and depth (sub-
  senses, relations to other words)
• re...
Why Language Chunks?
• create unique partnerships in English

  clear soup - clean driving record
  car accident - shipwre...
Why Language Chunks?

• help avoid wordier way of expression

The policeman told me to pull over. (instead of:
The policem...
Why Language Chunks?

• promote fluency,
• ready for use at any moment without reassembling
Why Language Chunks?

• increase comprehension, help anticipate what comes
 next


It went in one ear ...and out the other...
Why Language Chunks?

• reinforce grammatical structures

Would you mind holding the door?

On the other hand
Why Language Chunks?

• show how things are done and
• how thoughts, ideas, emotions are expressed in
 English
break ice
s...
Why Language Chunks?

• help recognize modified expressions

- One seller's loss is another cellar's gain in B.C.
- One wom...
Why Language Chunks?


• make feel belong, connected, secure, socially included
social phenomena: snowbird, sibling rivalr...
Teaching Chunks
• help notice and record language in chunks
• encourage lexical, not structural comparison between L1 and ...
Sample Lesson:
Slacking at the Office
• objectives and warm-up
• teacher input (presenting target language)
• guided and in...
Sample Lesson:
“Slacking at the Office” Audio
Conclusion
• advanced vocabulary is a prerequisite to successful integration
  into community and workplace

• thorough kn...
www.EnglishGateway.com

• over 300 pages of fully printable ESL vocabulary lessons
  featuring authentic stories, professi...
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From Intermediate to Advanced - Taking Vocabulary Skills to the Next Level

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Having reached intermediate level of English, many students are still at a loss for words in their daily interactions. The challenge to identify and use language chunks (collocations, phrasal verbs, idioms) in a native‐like manner along with
lack of cultural exposure are the main obstacles to advancing through the levels. The workshop will present a range of materials that help overcome these challenges

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  • Transcript of "From Intermediate to Advanced - Taking Vocabulary Skills to the Next Level "

    1. 1. From Intermediate to Advanced - Taking Vocabulary Skills to the Next Level by Olga Galperin ETAI, Jerusalem July 14, 2010
    2. 2. Outline • Word Frequency Curve • Vocabulary Size and Coverage • Language Chunks • Teaching Language Chunks • Sample Lesson Demonstration • Conclusion
    3. 3. Word Frequency Curve ,-./"012-345-"67"4"#!"8699617:;13<"013=>?"1@"?=1A-7"47<" ;36B-7"C7596?D"" +!" *%" *!" )!" (!" '!" &!" %!" $!" #!" '" %" $" #" !" !"#$%&'''$ %()$%&'''$ *+)$%&'''$ ,#-$%&'''$ .#-&$%&'''$ A. O’Keeffe, M. McCarthy, R. Carter From Corpus to Classroom, Cambridge University Press, 2007
    4. 4. Vocabulary Size and Coverage Density of Vocab. Size % Coverage Unknown Level Words 2, 000 words 83% 5 Basic 4, 000 words 88% 8 Low Interm. 5-6, 000 words 90% 10 Upper Interm. 9-10, 000 words 95% 20 Advanced In a 500-word text an upper-intermediate student has to look up 50 words. How motivating is this?
    5. 5. Find Someone Who... 1. hopes to make new contacts at the conference 2. thinks conference participants should do their best at reducing their carbon footprint 3. has bumped into an old acquaintance at the conference 4. always takes advantage of discounts on books at the conferences 5. enjoys hands-on workshops 6. agrees there’s a lot to take in at the conference of this magnitude What do the phrases in bold have in common? (handout page 1)
    6. 6. Types of Language Chunks • collocations (make contacts) • idioms (keep abreast of) • phrasal verbs (take in) • fixed expressions (...and the rest of it) • semi-fixed expressions (make the most of their/your/ our time/life/talents; love every minute/second of it)
    7. 7. Recognizing Language Chunks • phonological unity (said fast and all in one go): //make the most of your time// • pragmatic integrity, even if grammatically incomplete know if/whether
    8. 8. Chunks and Single Items From the Top 2,000 '&!!" '%!!" '$!!" '#!!" '!!!" &!!" %!!" $!!" #!!" !" 3"? ." 6" ." " 41 . 8 5 " ,. 3" ." " " 3" *5 " "-1 "*/" > " (3 ,* */" 6. 5 16"3 /+6 0 8. . . .; 34( .6 0( 3(18 4( 601< 5 ." 12- 75 .( 4. ." (- (-* 0 "7 "5 "34 00 ,- " 0 :. 4. + 5 6* 5 )* -"3 69 (" ." "> "34 *> .3 (3 :6 0* +" =* A. O’Keeffe, M. McCarthy, R. Carter From Corpus to Classroom, Cambridge University Press, 2007
    9. 9. The 6,000 to 10,000 word band • Chunks are salient • Chunks become semantically opaque, or idiomatic • Same word can have different frequencies based on its extended meanings compare: chair (table, sofa) vs. chair the meeting
    10. 10. Advanced Level Vocabulary • develops in breadth (linear increase) and depth (sub- senses, relations to other words) • requires understanding familiar words in unfamiliar surroundings (turn left vs. turn colors, turn a profit, take a turn for the worse/better, page-turner)
    11. 11. Why Language Chunks? • create unique partnerships in English clear soup - clean driving record car accident - shipwreck - plane crash turn on/off, hang up please help yourself, catch you later
    12. 12. Why Language Chunks? • help avoid wordier way of expression The policeman told me to pull over. (instead of: The policeman told me to bring my car to the side of the road.) I want to shop around before I decide to buy a new stove. (instead of: I want to go to different stores to compare the prices before... stove).
    13. 13. Why Language Chunks? • promote fluency, • ready for use at any moment without reassembling
    14. 14. Why Language Chunks? • increase comprehension, help anticipate what comes next It went in one ear ...and out the other. They worked from dawn ...to dusk.
    15. 15. Why Language Chunks? • reinforce grammatical structures Would you mind holding the door? On the other hand
    16. 16. Why Language Chunks? • show how things are done and • how thoughts, ideas, emotions are expressed in English break ice small talk bidding wars Do you think money grows on trees? Am I talking to a brick wall?
    17. 17. Why Language Chunks? • help recognize modified expressions - One seller's loss is another cellar's gain in B.C. - One woman's trash is another woman's treasure - GM Loss is Magna’s gain: Opel is coming to Canada (one man's trash is another man's treasure)
    18. 18. Why Language Chunks? • make feel belong, connected, secure, socially included social phenomena: snowbird, sibling rivalry, trail mix, open house, white collar crime, statutory holiday, pop quiz rituals: spring cleaning, cookie exchange, garage sale, bridal shower, pick-your-own farm everyday objects: Kleenex tissues, Ziploc bag, 3 ring binder, blue bin food: Oreo cookie, Eggs Benedict, chocolate fudge, Nanaimo bar
    19. 19. Teaching Chunks • help notice and record language in chunks • encourage lexical, not structural comparison between L1 and L2 • present thematically, based on phrase meanings (not key words) • explore collocational fields and phrase boundaries • expose to multiple encounters • teach through texts (stories and passages rather than sentences) by guided discovery, contextual guesswork
    20. 20. Sample Lesson: Slacking at the Office • objectives and warm-up • teacher input (presenting target language) • guided and independent practice (from most to least structured) • summary (recapping the experience)
    21. 21. Sample Lesson: “Slacking at the Office” Audio
    22. 22. Conclusion • advanced vocabulary is a prerequisite to successful integration into community and workplace • thorough knowledge of language chunks (awareness and ability to use) promotes students to advanced stages of learning English • cultural awareness significantly reduces chances of miscommunication • ‘talking the talk’ is an ability to connect with the native speakers of English that is rooted in learner linguistic and cultural competence
    23. 23. www.EnglishGateway.com • over 300 pages of fully printable ESL vocabulary lessons featuring authentic stories, professional audio, vocabulary and cultural enrichment exercises, covering hundreds of idioms, phrasal verbs and collocations • over 40 ESL vocabulary worksheets and lesson plans with teacher notes, based on real life topics • unlimited printing and downloads • new resources added monthly
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