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Sonnets
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Sonnets

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Form and structure of sonnets, context and close analysis.

Form and structure of sonnets, context and close analysis.

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  • 1. Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? FORM – WhatThou art more lovely and more temperate. kind of poem isRough winds do shake the darling buds of May, this? How do youAnd summer’s lease hath all too short a date. know?Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, 1.And often is his gold complexion dimmed, 2. 3.And every fair from fair sometime declines, 4.By chance or nature’s changing course untrimmed;But thy eternal summer shall not fadeNor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st,Nor shall death brag thou wander’st in his shadeWhen in eternal lines to time thou grow’st.So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
  • 2. The Shakespearean Sonnet:‘The Little Black Dress of Poetry’Learning Objective:AO2: Demonstrate detailed criticalunderstanding in analysing the ways inwhich structure and form shape meaning.A: Insightful and conceptual with extremelydetailed reference to texts.B: Relevant and analytical with detailedreference to text.C: Appropriate and effective with worthwhilereference to text.
  • 3. Shakespearean Sonnet Form and Structure__________________ Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate. Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer’s lease hath all too short a date. Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed, And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance or nature’s changing course untrimmed;__________ But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st, Nor shall death brag thou wander’st in his shade When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st. So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. Lines
  • 4. Shakespearean Sonnet Form and Structure Rhyme can also be: ABBA/ CDDC/ EFFE/ GGIambic_________pentameter_________ Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? A Thou art more lovely and more temperate. B Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, A Quatrain And summer’s lease hath all too short a date. B octave Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, C And often is his gold complexion dimmed, D And every fair from fair sometime declines, C Quatrain By chance or nature’s changing course untrimmed; Dvolta__________ But thy eternal summer shall not fade E F Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st, Quatrain Nor shall death brag thou wander’st in his shade E sestet When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st. F So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, G14 Lines! G Couplet So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
  • 5. But that’s just a load of terminology? How do we make it: A: Insightful and conceptual with extremely detailed reference to texts. B: Relevant and analytical with detailed reference to text. C: Appropriate and effective with worthwhile reference to text.We need to understand why awriter would use a sonnet form andhow it effects a reader.
  • 6. Conflict between Content and FormOverwhelming/ Contradictory/ Confusing Emotion VS Tight/ organised/ Rule-driven/ Pedantic Form
  • 7. Fill in the grid on whether this sonnet meets the regular form and structure of a Shakespearean sonnet. Tick/ cross initially. Choose at least five sections to find a detailed quote from and explain effect. The Kaleidoscope
  • 8. The Kaleidoscope – Douglas Dunn Is this typical To climb these stairs again, bearing a tray, Look closely atimagery? Might be to find you pillowed with your books, this rhyme – what’s unusual? Your inventories listing gowns and frocks As if preparing for a holiday. How has the Or, turning from the landing, I might find rhyme scheme Who iswatching My presence watched through your kaleidoscope, changed sincewho? Is it A symmetry of husbands, each redesigned the previous typical? quatrain? In lovely forms of foresight, prayer and hope. I climb these stairs a dozen times a day And, by the open door, wait, looking in What has What At where you died. My hands become a tray happened to thechanges at sentences here? Offering me, my flesh, my soul, my skin.the volta? Grief wrongs us so. I stand, and wait, and cry How many For the absurd forgiveness, not knowing why. syllables are in this line?
  • 9. The Kaleidoscope – Douglas DunnTo climb these stairs again, bearing a tray,Might be to find you pillowed with your books,Your inventories listing gowns and frocksAs if preparing for a holiday.Or, turning from the landing, I might findMy presence watched through your kaleidoscope,A symmetry of husbands, each redesignedIn lovely forms of foresight, prayer and hope.I climb these stairs a dozen times a dayAnd, by the open door, wait, looking inAt where you died. My hands become a trayOffering me, my flesh, my soul, my skin.Grief wrongs us so. I stand, and wait, and cryFor the absurd forgiveness, not knowing why.
  • 10. What is the significance ofthe title ‘The Kaleidoscope’? What is the relationship between the kaleidoscope and Dunn’s choice of an irregular sonnet as his form?
  • 11. Choose your best comment on structure or form in the poem. Does it? A: Sophisticated and perceptive with extremely detailed reference to texts. B: Secure and systematic with detailed reference to text. C: Appropriate and effective with worthwhile reference to text. Remember the focus is on why a writer would use a sonnet form and how it effects a reader.
  • 12. Your Turn!In pairs, read your new sonnet in the pack...Fill in the grid on structure and form – commenting on at least 4 moments.In 20 minutes you will present your poem back to the class! Explaining how the poet uses form and structure to shape meaning.
  • 13. Success Criteria A: Sophisticated and perceptive with extremely detailed reference to texts. B: Secure and systematic with detailed reference to text. C: Appropriate and effective with worthwhile reference to text.Remember the focus is on why awriter would use a sonnet form andhow it effects a reader.
  • 14. Thomas Wyatt – I find no peace – c. 1520I find no peace, and all my war is done.I fear and hope, I burn and freeze like ice,I fly above the wind, yet can I not arise,And naught I have, and all the world I season.That loosest nor locket, holdeth me in prison,And holdeth me not, yet can I scape no wise,Nor letteth me live, nor die at my device,And yet of death it giveth me occasion.Without eyen I see, and without tongue I plain,I desire to perish, and yet I ask health,I love another, and thus I hate myself,I feed me in sorrow and laugh in all my pain,Likewise displeaseth me both death and life,And my delight is causer of this strife.
  • 15. Shakespeare – My mistress’ eyes- Sonnet 130 – c.1600 My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips’ red. If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. I have seen roses damasked, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks, And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound. I grant I never saw a goddess go: My mistress when she walks treads on the ground. And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare.
  • 16. John Keats – When I have fears - 1819. When I have fears that I may cease to be Before my pen has gleand my teeming brain, Before high piled books, in charactry, Hold like rich garners the full-ripend grain; When I behold, upon the nights starrd face, Huge cloudy symbols of a high romance, And think that I may never live to trace Their shadows, with the magic hand of chance; And when I feel, fair creature of an hour, That I shall never look upon thee more, Never have relish in the faery power Of unreflecting love!—then on the shore Of the wide world I stand alone, and think Till Love and Fame to Nothingness do sink.
  • 17. Am I To Lose You? - Louise Bevington - 1881 ‘Am I to lose you now?’ The words were light; You spoke them, hardly seeking a reply, That day I bid you quietly ‘Good-bye,’ And sought to hide my soul away from sight. The question echoes, dear, through many a night,— My question, not your own—most wistfully; ‘Am I to lose him?’ asked my heart of me; ‘Am I to lose him now, and lose him quite?’ And only you can tell me. Do you care That sometimes we in quietness should stand As fellow-solitudes, hand firm in hand, And thought with thought and hope with hope compare? What is your answer? Mine must ever be, ‘I greatly need your friendship: leave it me.’
  • 18. The Last Things – Gavin Ewart – c.1980Of course there’s always a last everything.The last meal, the last drink, the last sex.The last meeting with a friend. The laststroking of the last cat, the lastsight of a son or daughter. Some would be morecharged with emotion than others – if one knew.It’s not knowing that makes it all so piquant.A good many lasts have taken place already.Then there are last words, variously reported,such as: Let not poor Nelly starve. Or:I think I could eat one of Bellamy’s veal pies.If there were time I’d incline to a summary:Alcohol made my life shorter but more interesting.My father said (not last perhaps): Say goodbye to Gavin.
  • 19. Homework: Due ThursdayChoose any 2 sonnets in this booklet (can be Kaleidoscope and the one you specialised in) and answer the following question. Read the two poems (Item A and Item B) carefully, bearing in mind that they were written at different times by different writers and are open to different interpretations. Compare the ways that the poets present unrequited love. In your answer you should consider the ways in which the poets use form, structure and language to present their thoughts and ideas. You should make relevant references to your wider reading in the poetry of love.
  • 20. How to Answer• This is an exam style question – try and compare the two poems in form/ structure/ language (I will be paying particular attention to form and structure in light of today’s lessons).• I want you to spend no longer than 1 hour 30 minutes writing (even that is longer than you will have in the exam: ideal time 50 minutes). Please handwrite your answers to practice exam technique. Spend the time planning your answer at this stage, not writing it.
  • 21. Wider Reading TipsTry and bring in brief references to your wider reading (it can be absolutely anything!). Potential examples from our reading...• Victorian Literature: Tess of the D’urbervilles, John Clare’s nature sonnets, Rossetti or Browning’s poetry (and anything else you may have read!)• A View From The Bridge: Eddie Carbone’s passion?• Othello and Desdemona• Romeo and Juliet – use of sonnets at meeting/ parodied love for Rosaline• Novel pack (from last year!): Darcy’s proposal// Mr Elton’s proposal// Gatsby.• Chaucer: Troilus and Criseyde, parody in Miller’s Tale• GCSE Anthology• Courtly Lover: Wyatt ‘They Flee From Me That Sometime did they seek’, Greensleeves• And anything else you have ever read! Whatever books you like to read

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