Thirty forms of money blog version

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Thirty forms of money blog version

  1. 1. cash = paper and coin moneycoins = metal moneynotes (UK) / bills (US) = paper moneycheque (UK) / check (US) = basically, a note to a bank to pay a certain amount to a certainperson or companyIOU / Note of Hand = given when a person doesnt have sufficient cash to meet a bill.Literally: I owe you.credit cards and debit cards = with credit cards the amount spent (or charged to the card)can be paid in instalments (i.e. the total sum can be divided into smaller amounts to be paidover time). With debit cards, however, the amount must be paid in full at the end of themonth. Amex green card is an example.capital = amount of total assetsreserves = money put aside for future usefunds = amount of money held or expectedcurrencies = the medium of exchange of countriesdeposit = the money held by banks on behalf of their customersmonies = various forms of moneyloan = money borrowed from whatever sourcedebt = money owed to whatever sourcesubsidy = financial assistance given (sometimes) by governments to help some industriessalary = remuneration (money) paid monthly to professional workers (like solicitors (UK) /attorneys (US), doctors, etc.) Salary comes from the fact that Roman soldiers were paid partof their money in a monthly salt (sal) allowance.wages = the weekly payment to manual workersincome = money from all sourcesfinance = matters concerning moneypension = money paid to the retired. Note that in English you cannot use this for any othertype of payment, i.e. child support, ex-wives, etc.maintenance = the money paid to support children and ex-wivesallowance = money paid by fathers to teenage children to allow them to buy things forthemselvesrebate = a form of refund, often associated with tax adjustmentsbudget = a formal projection of income and spendingaid = financial assistance to less fortunate countriesfees = how self-employed / free-lance professionals receive their money. Salaries are fixed,whereas fees in a month can vary hugely.instalment (UK) / installment (US) = a small monthly payment to reduce a larger debtgift = money given freely as a favour to another persondonation = freely given money to a charity or political partyfinancial statement = a formal document showing a companys fiscal situationshares (UK) / stocks (US) = issued by a company, and sold on the stock market, to raise cashstake = a financial holding in a company. If you have shares in a company, then you have a stakein the companys future.voucher = any form of pre-paid ticket that allows you to buy somethingbonds = issued by a company to raise cash. The bond is redeemable after a fixed period at afixed rate of interest.gilts (UK) / Treasury bills (US) = simply put, government bondsUS=American English GB=British English

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