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British and english culture, behaviour Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Liliana María Maturana Patarroyo
  • 2. General facts
    • Working in Britain
    • The Working Day: The usual working day starts at 9am and finishes by 5pm. Most people work a five-day week.
    • The working week is, on average, the longest of any country in Europe. In 1998 a new law was passed saying that workers do not have to work more than 48 hours a week if they don't want to. However, about 22% of British workers do work more than a 48-hour a week.
    • British employers must give their workers 24 days paid holiday a year.
  • 3.
    • The English are said to be reserved in manners, dress and speech. We are famous for our politeness, self-discipline and especially for our sense of humour. Basic politeness (please, thank you, excuse me) is expected.
    • You may be called by many different 'affectionate' names, according to which part of the England you are visiting. Do not be offended, this is quite normal. For example, you may be called dear, dearie, flower, love, chick, chuck, me duck, me duckie, mate, guv, son, ma'am, madam, miss, sir, or treacle, according to your sex, age and location. 
  • 4.
    • Greetings in Britain
    • The Handshake
    • A handshake is the most common form of greeting among the English and British people and is customary when you are introduced to somebody new.
    • The Kiss
    • It is only when you meet friends, whom you haven't seen for a long time, that you would kiss the cheek of the opposite sex. In Britain one kiss is generally enough.
  • 5.
    • Formal greetings
    • The usual formal greeting is a 'How do you do?' and a firm handshake, but with a lighter touch between men and women.
    • ‘ How do you do?’ is a greeting not a question and the correct response is to repeat ‘How do you do?' You say this when shaking hands with someone.
    • First person "How do you do?" Second person " How do you do?"
    • 'How are you?' is a question and the most common and polite response is "I am fine thank you and you?"
    • First person "How are you?" Second person "I am fine thank you and you?"
    • Nice to meet you – Nice to meet you too. (Often said whilst shaking hands)
    • Delighted to meet you– Delighted to meet you too.
    • Pleased to meet you – Pleased to meet you too. .
    • Glad to meet you - Glad to meet you too
    • Good Morning / Good Afternoon / Good Evening
  • 6.
    • Informal greetings
    • Hi - Hi or hello
    • Morning / Afternoon / Evening ( We drop the word 'Good' in informal situations).
    • How's you? - Fine thanks. You?
    • Thank you / thanks / cheers
    • We sometime say 'cheers' instead of thank you. You may hear 'cheers' said instead of 'good bye', what we are really saying is 'thanks and bye'.
  • 7.
    • Social Customs
    • British people place considerable value on punctuality. If you agree to meet friends at three o'clock, you can bet that they'll be there just after three. Since Britons are so time conscious, the pace of life may seem very rushed. In Britain, people make great effort to arrive on time. It is often considered impolite to arrive even a few minutes late. If you are unable to keep an appointment, it is expected that you call the person you are meeting.
  • 8.
    • You should arrive:
    • * At the exact time specified – for dinner, lunch, or appointments with professors, doctors, and other professionals.
    • * Any time during the hours specified for teas, receptions, and cocktail parties.
    • * A few minutes early: for public meetings, plays, concerts, movies, sporting events, classes, church services, and weddings.
    • If you are invited to someone's house for dinner at half past seven, they will expect you to be there on the dot. An invitation might state "7.30 for 8", in which case you should arrive no later than 7.50. However, if an invitation says "sharp", you must arrive in plenty of time.
  • 9.
    • Invitations
    • “ Drop in anytime” and “come see me soon” are idioms often used in social settings but seldom meant to be taken literally. It is wise to telephone before visiting someone at home. If you receive a written invitation to an event that says “RSVP”, you should respond to let the person who sent the invitation know whether or not you plan to attend.
    • Never accept an invitation unless you really plan to go. You may refuse by saying, “Thank you for inviting me, but I will not be able to come.” If, after accepting, you are unable to attend, be sure to tell those expecting you as far in advance as possible that you will not be there.
    • Although it is not necessarily expected that you give a gift to your host, it is considered polite to do so, especially if you have been invited for a meal. Flowers, chocolate, or a small gift are all appropriate. A thank-you note or telephone call after the visit is also considered polite and is an appropriate means to express your appreciation for the invitation.
  • 10.
    • Dress
    • Everyday dress is appropriate for most visits to peoples' homes. You may want to dress more formally when attending a holiday dinner or cultural event, such as a concert or theatre performance.
    • Introduction and Greeting
    • It is proper to shake hands with everyone to whom you are introduced, both men and women. An appropriate response to an introduction is "Pleased to meet you". If you want to introduce yourself to someone, extend you hand for a handshake and say "Hello, I am....". Hugging is only for friends.
  • 11.
    • Dining
    • When you accept a dinner invitation, tell your host if you have any dietary restrictions. He or she will want to plan a meal that you can enjoy. The evening meal is the main meal of the day in most parts of Britain.
    • Food may be served in one of several ways: "family style," by passing the serving plates from one to another around the dining table; "buffet style," with guests serving themselves at the buffet; and "serving style," with the host filling each plate and passing it to each person. Guests usually wait until everyone at their table has been served before they begin to eat. Food is eaten with a knife and fork and dessert with a spoon and fork.
  • 12. DOs and DON'TS (Taboos) in England
    • Do stand in line:  text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com
    • In England we like to form orderly queues (standing in line) and wait patiently for our turn e.g. boarding a bus. It is usual to queue when required, and expected that you will take your correct turn and not push in front. 'Queue jumping' is frowned upon.
    • Do take your hat off when you go indoors  (men only)
    • It is impolite for men to wear hats indoors especially in churches.
    • Nowadays, it is becoming more common to see men wearing hats indoors. However, this is still seen as being impolite, especially to the older generations. 
  • 13.
    • Do say "Excuse Me":  text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com
    • If someone is blocking your way and you would like them to move, say excuse me and they will move out of your way.
    • Do Pay as you Go:
    • Pay for drinks as you order them in pubs and other types of bars.
    • Do say "Please" and "Thank you":
    • It is very good manners to say "please" and "thank you". It is considered rude if you don't. You will notice in England that we say 'thank you' a lot.
  • 14.
    • Do cover your Mouth:
    • When yawning or coughing always cover your mouth with your hand.
    • Do Shake Hands:
    • When you are first introduced to someone, shake their right hand with your own right hand.
    • Do say sorry:
    • If you accidentally bump into someone, say 'sorry'. They probably will too, even if it was your fault! This is a habit and can be seen as very amusing by an 'outsider'.
    • Do Smile:  text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com
    • A smiling face is a welcoming face.
    • Do Drive on the left side of the road
    • Do open doors for other people
    • Men and women both hold open the door for each other. It depends on who goes through the door first.
  • 15.
    • Do not greet people with a kiss:  We only kiss people who are close friends and relatives.
    • Avoid talking loudly in public
    • It is impolite to stare at anyone in public. Privacy is highly regarded. text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com
    • Do not ask a lady her age It is considered impolite to ask a lady her age
    • Do not pick your nose in public:   We are disgusted by this. If your nostrils need de-bugging, use a handkerchief.
  • 16.
    • Avoid doing gestures such as backslapping and hugging  This is only done among close friends.
    • Do not spit.  Spitting in the street is considered to be very bad mannered.
    • Do not burp in public   You may feel better by burping loudly after eating or drinking, but other people will not! If you can not stop a burp from bursting out, then cover your mouth with your hand and say 'excuse me' afterwards.
    • Do not pass wind in public  text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com Now how can we say this politely? Let's say that you want to pass wind. What do you do? Go somewhere private and let it out. If you accidentally pass wind in company say 'pardon me'.
    • Avoid doing gestures such as backslapping and hugging  This is only done among close friends.
    • Do not spit.  Spitting in the street is considered to be very bad mannered.
    • Do not burp in public   You may feel better by burping loudly after eating or drinking, but other people will not! If you can not stop a burp from bursting out, then cover your mouth with your hand and say 'excuse me' afterwards.
    • Do not pass wind in public  text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com Now how can we say this politely? Let's say that you want to pass wind. What do you do? Go somewhere private and let it out. If you accidentally pass wind in company say 'pardon me'.
  • 17.
    • In all countries in Britain ...
    • Women in Britain are entitled to equal respect and status as men (and indeed vice versa) in all areas of life and tend to have more independence and responsibility than in some other cultures. Women are usually independent and accustomed to entering public places unaccompanied. It is usual for women to go out and about on their own as well as with friends. Men and women mix freely.
    • It is ok for women to eat alone in a restaurant.
    • It is ok for women to wander around on their own.
    • It is ok for women to drink beer.
  • 18. Language
    • BOBBY  n. 1. Policeman
    • BLOODY HELL  (blud-ee-el) Expletive. 1. This blasphemous expression may be used to voice one's incredulity about something just said. This is equivalent to the American phrase "Why, Gosh. Who would have thought!“
    • BOOK  v. 1. To reserve. The British never reserve a table at a restaurant or a room at an hotel, they always BOOK it.
    • CATS EYES  n. 1. The reflectors that are imbedded in the middle of the road to make it easier to see the middle line at night.
    • CHEERS  phrase. 1. A typical English drinking toast. 2.Thanks. .3. Good bye.
  • 19.
    • CHEERIO  phrase. 1. Good bye.
    • CHUFFED  adv. 1. Happy, as in, "I was really CHUFFED when I passed my exams.“
    • DOUBLE DECKER  n. 1. A two-level bus.
    • DRAWING ROOM  n. 1. Living room.
    • FATHER CHRISTMAS.   n.  British name for Santa Claus.
    • HOLIDAY(S).   n.  Vacation trip; vacation time period.
    • KICK THE BUCKET  v. 1. Die 
    • LOO  n. 1. Toilet. Also called lav, lavatory or bog
    • LORRY  n. 1. Truck.
    • MUM.   n.  Mother; equivalent to the American "mom."
  • 20.
    • NOUGHTS AND CROSSES  n. 1. The game of tic tac toe.
    • OVER THE MOON  phrase. 1. Very pleased.
    • PITCH.   n.  A playing field for sports, as in the "Football pitch.“
    • POST.   n.  The mail.
    • RUBBER  n. 1. Eraser.
    • RUBBISH  n. 1. Trash.
    • SPEND A PENNY  phrase. 1. To go to the toilet. From the days when public conveniences required a penny to be put in the slot to enter.
    • SLEEPING POLICEMAN.   n . A speed hump or speed bump.
    • TELLY  n. 1. A television (Also called 'the box')
    • UNDERGROUND   n  (With a capital letter) the London subway system. Also called The Tube
    • WAY OUT  n. 1. Exit.
    • WHACKED  adj. 1. Tired. Exhausted.
  • 21. PUBS
  • 22.
    • The word pub is short for public house. There are over 60,000 pubs in the UK (53,000 in England and Wales, 5,200 in Scotland and 1,600 in Northern Ireland). One of the oldest pubs, Fighting Cocks in St. Albans, Herts, is located in a building that dates back to the eleventh century.
    • Pubs are an important part of British life. People talk, eat, drink, meet their friends and relax there.
    • Pubs often have two bars, one usually quieter than the other, many have a garden where people can sit in the summer. Children can go in pub gardens with their parents.
  • 23.
    • Groups of friends normally buy 'rounds' of drinks, where the person whose turn it is will buy drinks for all the members of the group. It is sometimes difficult to get served when pubs are busy: people do not queue, but the bar staff will usually try and serve those who have been waiting the longest at the bar first. If you spill a stranger's drink by accident, it is good manners (and prudent) to offer to buy another drink.
    • British pubs are required to have a licence, which is difficult to obtain, and allows the pub to operate for up to 24 hours. Most pubs are open from 11 to 11.
  • 24.
    • Pubs have traditional names which date back over 600 years.
    • Some typical names are The Chequers, The White Swan, The Crown, The King's Arms, The Red Lion and The White Horse. People often refer to the pub by its name when giving directions: Turn left at the Rose and Crown. There is usually a sign outside the pub showing the pub's name with a picture.
    • Pubs have traditional names which date back over 600 years.
    • Some typical names are The Chequers, The White Swan, The Crown, The King's Arms, The Red Lion and The White Horse. People often refer to the pub by its name when giving directions:Turn left at the Rose and Crown. There is usually a sign outside the pub showing the pub's name with a picture.
  • 25.
    • The legal age for drinking in one's home is 5 provided parental consent is given. Children under 5 must not be given alcohol unless under medical supervision in an emergency.
    • Customs in British pubs differ from those in American bars. In most pubs in Britain, you must go to the bar to order drinks and food and pay for your purchase immediately, there is no table service. Bartenders are called "barmen" and "barmaids" and they do not expect frequent tipping. To tip a barman or barmaid, it is customary to tell him to "would you like a drink yourself?"
    • Some pubs have a waiting service, where orders are taken by waiters at the tables and not paid for immediately. There is usually a sign in the pub which tells you that diners will be served at the table. It is customary to tip your waiter/waitress at the end of the meal (approx 10%). Sometimes this is included in the bill.
  • 26. Important Landmarks in London Buckingham Palace is one of the most popular landmarks in London. It is the London home of the British Royal Family. The 600 room palace is surrounded by a 40 acre garden .
  • 27. The Palace of Westminster
    • The Palace of Westminster, known also as the Houses of Parliament, is where the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons) conduct their sittings. The Palace lies on the north bank of the River Thames in the London borough of the City of Westminster.
  • 28. Big Ben
  • 29. Thames River – The House of Parliament
  • 30. Tower of London This royal fortress, on the north banks of the River Thames, was built by William the Conqueror, following his successful invasion in 1066. It has been added to over the years by the various monarchs. The Tower, or Bloody Tower as it is known, has been host to many famous executions and imprisonments, including those of Anne Boleyn, Catherine Howard, Lady Jane Grey and Sir Walter Raleigh. The Jewel House, which houses the Crown Jewels, lies within the confines of the Tower of London.
  • 31. The London Eye The London Eye, next to County Hall, is another of London’s most modern landmarks. It is the world’s biggest ferries wheel, and will carry 800 passengers at a time on a thirty-minute ride. From its highest point of 450 feet, it promises views of up to 25 miles.
  • 32. Windsor Windsor Castle has been a royal residence for over 900 years and today is one of the homes of Queen Elizabeth ll. The royal standard flies from the round tower of the Castle when the Queen is in residence.
  • 33.  
  • 34. Trafalgar Square
  • 35. Highgate Cemetery (East)
  • 36. Peter Pan Sculpture in Kensington
  • 37. Pembroke College in Cambridge
  • 38. Covent Garden
  • 39.  
  • 40. The British Museum
  • 41. Kensington Palace
  • 42. The Serpentine – Kensington Garden
  • 43. St Martin in the Fields