Nineteenth century literature

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Nineteenth century literature

  1. 1. Literature in the Nineteenth Century
  2. 2. Literary Scene in the 19 th Cen. <ul><li>Romanticism </li></ul><ul><li>Victorian Novel </li></ul><ul><li>Sentimental and Domestic Literature </li></ul><ul><li>Popular Poetry </li></ul>
  3. 3. Romanticism <ul><li>Valuing of self as subjectmatter </li></ul><ul><li>Valuing of emotion </li></ul><ul><li>Interest in the exotic, bizarre and extraordinary </li></ul><ul><li>Nature as the catalyst for visionary or transcendent experience </li></ul>
  4. 4. Gothic Novel <ul><li>The Gothic form, named for the Medieval architectural style of cathedrals and castles of the period, emerged in the 18 th century </li></ul><ul><li>Gothic tales were set in dark castles, crypts, and churches </li></ul><ul><li>Gothic fiction was written with the intention of providing audiences with a good scare </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Gothic novels and tales were very popular through the 19 th century, but not considered “high art.” </li></ul><ul><li>Examples include the works of Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe </li></ul><ul><li>We see Gothic settings and other elements influencing later literature, for example, Shelley’s Frankenstein, Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown,” and Edgar Allen Poe’s fiction. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Rise of the Novel <ul><li>The genre of novel-writing emerged during the 18 th century: </li></ul><ul><li>Samuel Richardson’s Pamela </li></ul><ul><li>Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones </li></ul><ul><li>Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders </li></ul><ul><li>Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko , which is usually credited with being the first real English novel (1689). </li></ul>
  7. 7. Sentimental Fiction <ul><li>Sentimental, sensationalist or “scandal” fiction were tremendously popular </li></ul><ul><li>The female authors who wrote them found ample means of supporting themselves through this kind of writing </li></ul><ul><li>These novels usually include the tale of “fallen women” </li></ul><ul><li>Illicit sexuality was their main focus </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>These novels usually include the tale of “fallen women” </li></ul><ul><li>Illicit sexuality was their main focus </li></ul><ul><li>Examples include the works of Delarivier Manley and Eliza Haywood </li></ul>
  9. 9. Novels of Virtue <ul><li>Novels of virtue also emerged as instructional texts for female behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Their authors saw them as countering the looser morals of scandal fiction heroines </li></ul><ul><li>Examples include the works of Jane Barker, Penelope Aubin and Mary Davys </li></ul><ul><li>These too provided women with the means to be self-supporting authors </li></ul>
  10. 10. Victorian Novels <ul><li>The novel as a form reached a peak in popularity during the 19 th century (often referred to as the Victorian period, after Queen Victoria). </li></ul><ul><li>The novel gained artistic respect in the 19 th century as well, expanding the form thematically and artistically. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Some Victorian Novelists <ul><li>Charles Dickens </li></ul><ul><li>Jane Austen </li></ul><ul><li>George Eliot </li></ul><ul><li>Emily Bronte </li></ul><ul><li>Charlotte Bronte </li></ul><ul><li>Lewis Carroll </li></ul><ul><li>Rudyard Kipling </li></ul><ul><li>Robert Louis Stevenson </li></ul><ul><li>William Thackeray </li></ul><ul><li>Anthony Trollope </li></ul>

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