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Marketing: Internet Content Design
 

Marketing: Internet Content Design

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Content is seen as a commodity. Everyone has content and words on their pages. Everyone has a bunch of web pages and information. But is this mindset creating a competitive advantage? Is it ...

Content is seen as a commodity. Everyone has content and words on their pages. Everyone has a bunch of web pages and information. But is this mindset creating a competitive advantage? Is it delivering your message and demonstrating your expertise in the most valuable ways?

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  • Instead of being considered part of the final deliverable, or as an extension to it, web content is simply viewed as a means for quick and economical distribution. If we post it, users will come is the common mantra.Given this mindset, content is seen as a commodity. Everyone has content and words on their pages. Everyone has a bunch of web pages and information. But is this mindset creating a competitive advantage? Is it delivering your message and demonstrating your expertise in the most valuable ways?

Marketing: Internet Content Design Marketing: Internet Content Design Presentation Transcript

  • Marketing: Internet ContentDesignIndependent StudyBMKT 2060Erica DipyaticMBA Candidateend8@pitt.eduFall 2009
  • ContentsEvolution of Content Marketing 2Scanning & Satisfying 5The Web is Content. Content is the Web 8Creating Valuable Web Content 12 • Who 13 • What 14 • When 15 • Where 16 • Why 17 • How 18References 191 Erica Dipyatic, Fall 2009, Marketing Independent Study
  • Evolution of Online ContentMarketing
  • Solving ProblemsEvolution of online content marketing Yesterday Today • Talk to corporate liaisons, account or sales • Google (search) representatives • Online portals, news or company specific sites • Product /service brochures and literature • Reading trusted advice and opinions (op-ed) • Seek information via ads • Blogger’s • B2B – Magazine, Newspaper, Airport signage • Corporate information • Case studies • Word-of-mouth ~ “Word-of-mouse”3 Erica Dipyatic, Fall 2009, Marketing Independent Study
  • Why web sites?Evolution of online content marketing Goal(s) Web content Inform user “Pull” technology • Answer question(s) • Available 24 x 7 x 365 • Help to do a specific task, job • Easy to share • Easy to find Start, and continue, to build relationship • Book marks • Issue/solution driven • Search Share knowledge, expertise First impression! • Thought leadership • Interested user, potential client • Shape market • Qualified lead • Develop trust Sell • Continue conversations • Learn more • Breadth and depth of services4 Erica Dipyatic, Fall 2009, Marketing Independent Study
  • Scanning & SatisfyingHow we read and use the Web
  • Scanning & SatisfyingHow we read and use the web. Examine your use of the web • Why did you go to the Web? • How did you get to your last visited web page? • Hyperlink • Book mark • Search result(s) • Once on a web page, how did you locate information? • What stood out to you? • What made you chose your next action? • The next page you visited?6 Erica Dipyatic, Fall 2009, Marketing Independent Study
  • Scanning & SatisfyingHow we read and use the web. Interactions on a web page (site) • Users scan first, then read • Grab information and go to next task • Short attention span • Ready for next “click” “Read” in an F shaped pattern • Predominant pattern • 2 horizontal passes • Vertical stripe 17 Erica Dipyatic, Fall 2009, Marketing Independent Study
  • The Web is Content. Contentis the Web2.Content is a Valuable Asset
  • The Web is Content. Content is the Web.Content is a valuable asset It starts with the content! The web is mostly made up of words. The words come together to provide a message, tell a story. The message/story provides information. • Details, values and benefits The information answers our questions. The questions lead us to the web. The web is content. Content is the web. Words Message CONTENT = Web Information Questions9 Erica Dipyatic, Fall 2009, Marketing Independent Study
  • The Web is Content. Content is the Web.Content is a valuable asset What makes content valuable? Valuable content can… • Timely, up-to-date • Build your brand • Reliable • Create a competitive advantage • Consistent • Generate conversations • Accessible • Start online (email, RSS, etc…) • Easy to find • Continue at events, meetings, etc • Usable/useful • Improve relationships and client retention • Informative • Help audience DO something • Enjoyable Obstacles to valuable content • Content isn’t easy to develop • Print vs online mindset • Is time-consuming • Content is seen as a commodity • The web has trillions of pages, information and content • Content standards are set really, really low • The web has trillions of pages, information and content10 Erica Dipyatic, Fall 2009, Marketing Independent Study
  • Most project schedules postpone content development until the eleventh hour. As a result, content quality is often seriously compromised. When we practice content strategy, we ensure that our web content is treated as a valuable business asset... …not an afterthought3.11 Erica Dipyatic, Fall 2009, Marketing Independent Study
  • Creating Valuable WebContentWriting for the Web
  • Creating Valuable Web ContentWriting for the Web Who? Action Focus on user, target audience Rethink approach • Show you care about users From corporate centric • Different questions = different answers • What do I / we want to tell you? • One answer doesn’t fit all needs • What do I / we want you to understand? • What do I / we wish you would do? • How can I / we make you care? To customer / user centric • What do YOU want to know? • What do YOU need to do? • What do YOU need to feel comfortable and smart? • What do YOU care about….really? People come to web sites for the content that they think (or hope) is there413 Erica Dipyatic, Fall 2009, Marketing Independent Study
  • Creating Valuable Web ContentWriting for the Web What? Action Deliver on promise (Titles) Stress issues & important topics • Tell me what I will find (on the page) • Don’t be cute or clever Satisfy users needs first Give useful, useable information for target audience • Looking for something • Answer users questions • Start of conversation • Develop relationship, trust • Create a conversation • Can sell, “market” to them later Cuts, cut & cut again Remove the fluff, “happy talk” and unnecessary filler • Less is more • Brief and to the point – get out of the way • Don’t bore user • Extra, related information deserves its own place14 Erica Dipyatic, Fall 2009, Marketing Independent Study
  • Creating Valuable Web ContentWriting for the Web When? Action Focus on delivering key information to user first to support the way users interact and read on the web. Inverted Pyramid5 Writing Information user MUST have 1. Key message/take away; conclusion 2. Supporting information 3. Background, about, technical details (if needed) Additional, useful, information, but not message critical Nice to have info.15 Erica Dipyatic, Fall 2009, Marketing Independent Study
  • Creating Valuable Web ContentWriting for the Web Where? Action Above the “fold”! • Use the Inverted Pyramid to guide online placement • Placement on screen before need to scroll down page • Essential message and information First! • Deliver value where user will find and pay attention to • Nice to have details – Last. details/information • Motivate to continue reading • Grab attention – don’t lose – by hiding valuable • Review web page on different computers information Most readers will read top most, first portion of the page. (Illustrative fold) Few readers will make it this far down on the page. Only the truly motivated will continue this far. Only the dedicate information seekers will continue to the end of the page.16 Erica Dipyatic, Fall 2009, Marketing Independent Study
  • Creating Valuable Web ContentWriting for the Web Why? Action Scan & satisfy Rethink approach • Develop web content that focuses on end user Grab & go (customer centric) • Less time spent reading online vs print/paper Deliver on promise (Titles) Come for information or document? • Stress issues & important topics • Including in documents (PDF attachments) Satisfy users needs first • Give useful, useable information for target audience • Answer users questions • Create a conversation Cuts, cut & cut again • Remove the fluff, “happy talk” and unnecessary filler • Brief and to the point – get out of the way Use the Inverted Pyramid to deliver above the fold • Essential message and information First! • Motivate to continue reading17 Erica Dipyatic, Fall 2009, Marketing Independent Study
  • Creating Valuable Web ContentWriting for the Web How? Action Continue conversation Use natural flow to deliver message • Message delivers and carries on dialogue • Advise on issue, topic and solution Avoid jargon Use your audiences/users words and questions • Online material available to broad audience • Titles and body content Short sentences and paragraphs Break down lengthy sentences. • Meet busy users needs (scan, grab & go) • Over use of commas in a sentence – consider creating • Avoid continuous walls of text separate sentences • Easily understood, and straight forward • Paragraphs, ideal 40-60 words for online reading • If need to read more than one time to understand – rewrite Visually appealing (enjoyable, useable, scan & go) Format online content differently than material • Body headings developed for print intended reading. • Short sentences and paragraphs • Outline key points and take aways from message into • Lists and tables bullets • Quotes (pull quotes) • Use page headings and subheadings to stress key material • Charts/diagrams Important to write and develop content for the web and not simply repurpose print developed content.18 Erica Dipyatic, Fall 2009, Marketing Independent Study
  • References Cited Additional Materials1 Redish, J., 2007, Letting Go of the Words Writing Web • Anderson, E., 2009, Word Perfect: Web Writing for Content that Works, San Francisco: Morgan Marketers, MarketingProfs* sponsored webinar. Kaufmann, 102-103. www.useit.com/eyetracking • English, W., 2009, Web Content Rx, Franklin Lakes: The Career Press, Inc.2 Halvorson, K., 2010, Content Strategy for the Web, Berkeley: New Rider, 15. www.newriders.com • Fideler, D., 2009, Write From Your Reader’s Perspective, MarketingProfs article.3 Halvorson, K., 2010, Content Strategy for the • Krug, S., 2006, Don’t Make Me Think! A Common Sense Web, Berkeley: New Rider, 3. www.newriders.com Approach to Web Usability, Second Edition, Berkeley: New Riders.4 Redish, J., 2007, Letting Go of the Words Writing Web Content that Works, San Francisco: Morgan • McKeon, P., 2009, Is Anybody Following Your Thought Kaufmann, 1. www.useit.com/eyetracking Leadership? Five Best-Practices, MarketingProfs article. • Pulizzi, J., 2008, Content Marketing: How to Position5 Redish, J., 2007, Letting Go of the Words Writing Web Your Company as a Trusted Expert Content that Works, San Francisco: Morgan Resource, MarketingProfs sponsored webinar. Kaufmann, 104. www.useit.com/eyetracking • Wuebben, J., 2008, Content Rich: Writing your Way to Wealth on the Web, Fallbrook: Encore Publishing Group.19 Erica Dipyatic, Fall 2009, Marketing Independent Study * www.marketingprofs.com