Threatened Species The Northern Bog Turtle
Description of Species <ul><li>Smallest member of the genus  Clemmys  and one of North America’s smallest turtles </li></u...
Habitat <ul><li>Small, discrete populations, generally occupying open-canopy, herbaceous sedge meadows and ferns bordered ...
Location <ul><li>Currently known to live in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and Penn...
Management Problems <ul><li>Wetland drainage basins are vulnerable to a number of factors </li></ul><ul><ul><li>subdivisio...
Why is it Threatened? <ul><li>Adverse Changes to Bog Turtle Habitat </li></ul><ul><li>Inadequacy of Existing Regulatory Me...
Save the Northern Bog Turtle! <ul><li>Plants and animals hold value </li></ul><ul><ul><li>medicinal, agricultural, ecologi...
Resources <ul><li>Bog Turtle (Clemmys muhlenbergii) Northern Population Recovery Plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.fws...
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Save the Northern Bog Turtle

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Save the Northern Bog Turtle

  1. 1. Threatened Species The Northern Bog Turtle
  2. 2. Description of Species <ul><li>Smallest member of the genus Clemmys and one of North America’s smallest turtles </li></ul><ul><li>Recognized by a light brown to ebony carapace and a bright yellow, orange, or red blotch on each side of the head </li></ul><ul><li>Limbs are dark brown; the feet are weakly webbed </li></ul>
  3. 3. Habitat <ul><li>Small, discrete populations, generally occupying open-canopy, herbaceous sedge meadows and ferns bordered by wooded areas. </li></ul><ul><li>Wetlands that include dry pockets, saturated areas, and areas that are periodically flooded. </li></ul><ul><li>Beaver, deer, and cattle may be instrumental in maintaining the open-canopy wetlands essential </li></ul><ul><li>for this species’ survival. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Location <ul><li>Currently known to live in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania </li></ul><ul><li>Along with New Jersey and Maryland, eastern Pennsylvania has been considered the stronghold of this species. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Management Problems <ul><li>Wetland drainage basins are vulnerable to a number of factors </li></ul><ul><ul><li>subdivisions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>wells </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>road construction activities. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In some areas, fire may have played a role in maintaining the nature of wetlands. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The extent of these wetlands has declined significantly since this routine burning was discontinued in the late 1960s. </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Why is it Threatened? <ul><li>Adverse Changes to Bog Turtle Habitat </li></ul><ul><li>Inadequacy of Existing Regulatory Mechanisms </li></ul><ul><li>Illegal Collection and Trade </li></ul><ul><li>Disease and Predation </li></ul>
  7. 7. Save the Northern Bog Turtle! <ul><li>Plants and animals hold value </li></ul><ul><ul><li>medicinal, agricultural, ecological, aesthetic </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Future generations should experience their presence and value </li></ul><ul><li>New York and Pennsylvania have both conducted more extensive and ongoing programs to manage turtle populations. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Resources <ul><li>Bog Turtle (Clemmys muhlenbergii) Northern Population Recovery Plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.fws.gov/northeast/nyfo/es/bogturtle.pdf </li></ul></ul><ul><li>http://www.endangeredspecie.com/Why_Save_.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.environmentaldefense.org/article.cfm?ContentID=153 </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.environmentaldefense.org/documents/3732_Species_Bog%20Turtle.pdf </li></ul>

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