2002
THE AUTHOR AND THE BOOK´S ORIGEN        Lee Ann Carroll writes about the results of a case study she participated in as th...
THEORETICAL QUESTIONS ADDRESSED IN THE              CHAPTERS    What is the writing development in college? a)      The re...
THE RESEARCH QUESTION AND THE AUTHOR´               STANCE         How students’ experiences in their first two         ye...
THE RESEARCH DESINGCompressive portfolios with college writing samples ofstudents in junior and senior years (textual anal...
FINDINGS                                          regarding students´ perspectivesThe college students in freshman year fe...
FINDINGS                                        regarding students´ perspectivesThe senior students recognize that in the ...
FINDINGS                                            regarding students´ perspectives     The less meaningful texts selecte...
THEORETHICAL CONCLUSIONSThe student development does not follow a neat and linearprogression.The rhetorical sophistication...
DEBATESCritical thinking is demanded and graded by professor in general educationcourses (first and second years), but it ...
DEBATES  What expectations could have the institutions anduniversity teachers in terms of developments after first        ...
DEBATES      What might students expect reasonably to learn about               writing in the freshman courses?What is th...
DEBATES          regarding assessment and writingregarding disciplinary teachers and compositionists
MY INSIGHTS …                    Practical implications in training experiences for university                    teachers...
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Presentation 1 Elizabeth Narváez Cardona

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Lee Ann Carroll writes about the results of a case study she participated in as the director of the Pepperdine University writing center. She is part of a movement called Writing-Across-the-Curriculum (WAC) that works toward having more writing in college. Not just in English, but in Engineering, Business, and the Sciences.

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Presentation 1 Elizabeth Narváez Cardona

  1. 1. 2002
  2. 2. THE AUTHOR AND THE BOOK´S ORIGEN Lee Ann Carroll writes about the results of a case study she participated in as the director of the Pepperdine University writing center. She is part of a movement called Writing-Across-the-Curriculum (WAC) that works toward having more writing in college. Not just in English, but in Engineering, Business, and the Sciences. She and several other professors wanted to find some answers for the common complaint of faculty “why can’t these kids write?”. A team of mathematicians and compositions decided to study a group of students for all their four years at college and see how their writing developed.Information retrieved literally from: http://adventurerightlyconsidered11.wordpress.com/lee-ann-carrolls-rehearsing-new-roles/
  3. 3. THEORETICAL QUESTIONS ADDRESSED IN THE CHAPTERS What is the writing development in college? a) The result of a maturation that is embedded in a larger process in time (years). b) The “value added”: the growth promoted by the efforts of the institutions, professors, and students themselves. How this type of development "looks"? How we can explore it?
  4. 4. THE RESEARCH QUESTION AND THE AUTHOR´ STANCE How students’ experiences in their first two year of college could affect their development as writers? The author recognizes that the first year composition courses are only a piece of a larger picture of the college writing development. Consequently, it also represents a transitional moment within such development.
  5. 5. THE RESEARCH DESINGCompressive portfolios with college writing samples ofstudents in junior and senior years (textual analysis ofinstructors’ comments, grades obtained andargumentative and rhetoric strategies used by thewriters).Interviews with students to identify beliefs and valueson writing according to their retrospective experiencesbased on their portfolios (e.g., they were asked to talkabout the successful learning experiences, the mostrepresentative text of their learning, and about theirdifficulties and strategies to solve them).Collection and textual analysis of the catalogdescriptions for English courses (the analysis of theofficial curriculum).Writing workshops for the research team to analyze thedata.
  6. 6. FINDINGS regarding students´ perspectivesThe college students in freshman year feel/think thatthey have to adjust their writing to the instructors’demands (which they interpret as idiosyncratic) in orderto get their grades and therefore being successful.However, freshman students do not recognizenecessarily the reasons why they should change the wayin which they wrote before starting college. During later stages of college education, students start to feel identified with specific features of disciplinary and professional writing (conventional and standardized genres), because they have understood that becoming, for instance, a journalist, a scientist, or a psychologist imposes writing demands as well.
  7. 7. FINDINGS regarding students´ perspectivesThe senior students recognize that in the junior years they wouldnot have been able to write sophisticated papers or projects thatthey actually had produced in senior years.However, they do not think that their writing has improved,rather than it has transformed (it is different in terms of complexstructure and content).Students selected as meaningful writingexperiences those that represented challenges andmilestones of their personal growth (as livingabroad), as well as experiences that allow them toexplore (practices and communities) outside theclassrooms (which they called “real world”), and useother types of diffusion means (e.g., digitalportfolios or videos): these writing experiencesseem to expand the students´ knowledge base.
  8. 8. FINDINGS regarding students´ perspectives The less meaningful texts selected by students were those associated with personal experiences, unless these texts had been related to their professional education; for instance, writing about their parents´ divorce, if the student was studying psychology (senior students).FINDINGSregarding composition courses The composition courses for first year students are mandatory and aim at practicing essay writing (3 per quarter) embedded in a process of iterative revisions and feedback of peers and support of instructor and the writing center. The composition instructors work in a colleague team to discuss their teaching materials, assignments, and readings; however, there are not standard syllabus, final exam, or final project that all instructors have to apply evenly.
  9. 9. THEORETHICAL CONCLUSIONSThe student development does not follow a neat and linearprogression.The rhetorical sophistication is the result of how students havefigured out by themselves how to cope with it, rather than as aresult of formal instruction.
  10. 10. DEBATESCritical thinking is demanded and graded by professor in general educationcourses (first and second years), but it is not taking in consideration the role ofthe sophisticated knowledge, which freshman student cannot affordnecessarily to achieve the instructors´ expectations.More writing experiences in the curriculum not necessarily would improvequalitatively writing abilities. There is a gap in writing both qualitatively andquantitatively across the courses. These variations that students haveexperienced seem to be more by accident than by instructional design. From students’ perspectives: student learning (what students know or changes in their thinking and interests) is not identical to the written text; therefore, final papers are not representative of their ability as writers. Even for some students, selecting a final paper was not possible, because they felt that their progress took place across different courses and moments rather than in specific texts (implications for further research projects).
  11. 11. DEBATES What expectations could have the institutions anduniversity teachers in terms of developments after first year classes or core courses?
  12. 12. DEBATES What might students expect reasonably to learn about writing in the freshman courses?What is the challenge in first-year composition courses?
  13. 13. DEBATES regarding assessment and writingregarding disciplinary teachers and compositionists
  14. 14. MY INSIGHTS … Practical implications in training experiences for university teachers led by composition scholars: These two chapters are valuable resources to discuss with university teachers what they think of the students´ perceptions. Giving room to their voices as well.Implications for further research:Collecting new data from the university teachers perspectivescould be useful to explore what they are expecting: Is there a developmental approach behind their ideas of teaching and learning? Do faculty members are aware of the writing demands in their fields to the extent that they would like to teach them to the students?Approaching to the development of writing and its learningfrom the different voices that are involved (e.g., universitydirectives, university teachers, and students) might beconvenient to gain new insights in this topic.

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