Elizabeth Bishop And Robert Lowell

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Elizabeth Bishop And Robert Lowell

  1. 1. Elizabeth Bishop<br />RUNDOWN<br />“At the Fishhouses”<br />Elizabeth Bishop<br />Robert Lowell<br />Letter to Lowell<br />Confessional <br />
  2. 2. After WWII, for some poets, a poem is :<br /><ul><li>An attempt to explore, tame, and distill raw experience</li></ul>RUNDOWN<br />Elizabeth Bishop<br />Robert Lowell<br /><ul><li>The product of retrospection</li></ul>Letter to Lowell<br />Confessional <br /><ul><li>A gesture of composure after the initial shock</li></li></ul><li>Bishop’s Techniques:<br /><ul><li>Observations/details
  3. 3. Panoramic beginning</li></ul>RUNDOWN<br /><ul><li>A moment of focus, zooming in, specificity</li></ul>Elizabeth Bishop<br />Robert Lowell<br />Letter to Lowell<br />Confessional <br /><ul><li>Zoom back out
  4. 4. A different focus</li></li></ul><li>Robert Lowell<br />RUNDOWN<br />Elizabeth Bishop<br />Robert Lowell<br />Letter to Lowell<br />Confessional <br />
  5. 5. Letter to Lowell<br />“mixing of fact and fiction”<br />RUNDOWN<br />“infinite mischief”<br />Elizabeth Bishop<br />Robert Lowell<br />“it’s cruel”<br />Letter to Lowell<br />Confessional <br />Conflicting poetic aesthetics<br />What is lit meant to accomplish? How?<br />
  6. 6.  <br />“To Speak of Woe That Is in Marriage”<br />&quot;It is the future generation that presses into being by means of these exuberant feelings and supersensible soap bubbles of ours.&quot;<br />—Schopenhauer<br />&quot;The hot night makes us keep our bedroom windows open.<br />Our magnolia blossoms. Life begins to happen.<br />My hopped up husband drops his home disputes,<br />and hits the streets to cruise for prostitutes,<br />free-lancing out along the razor&apos;s edge.<br />This screwball might kill his wife, then take the pledge.<br />Oh the monotonous meanness of his lust. . .<br />It&apos;s the injustice . . . he is so unjust—<br />whiskey-blind, swaggering home at five.<br />My only thought is how to keep alive.<br />What makes him tick? Each night now I tie<br />ten dollars and his car key to my thigh. . . .<br />Gored by the climacteric of his want,<br />he stalls above me like an elephant.&quot;<br />RUNDOWN<br />Elizabeth Bishop<br />Robert Lowell<br />Letter to Lowell<br />Confessional <br />
  7. 7. Confessional poetry<br /><ul><li>Life Studies, Robert Lowell</li></ul>RUNDOWN<br /><ul><li>Highly personal & private events & emotions
  8. 8. “I” is the poet</li></ul>Elizabeth Bishop<br />Robert Lowell<br />Letter to Lowell<br />Confessional <br /><ul><li>Maintain craftsmanship</li>

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