Integrated Product DevelopmentIntegrated Product Development ProcessThomas J. Howardhttps://sites.google.com/site/thomasja...
The three Key disciplines of IntegratedProduct Development (IPD)                               Market                     ...
The IPD model3   Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development   2012    Dep...
Purposes, uses and limitations of theIPD model    Purposes: The model will help you to understand       IPD and will help ...
Case Study    This case study will help you to relate the IPD                model to a real situation     It is also give...
Setting the scene6   Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development   2012   ...
Thank you to Crown Packagingfor case study material !
Project Brief          Follow your integrated Product      Development Process throughout this    brief to understand how ...
Team Members• Jerry Stimpson                             Closures Business• Jason Hegarty                              Clo...
Mission statement            “To produce an add-on            component to enable a           drizzle pouring function.”10...
Competitive advantage• Shape and functional differentiation. Unique with metal closure.• Salad dressing, marinades, sauces...
Project approval• Issue                                    2• Date                                     ******• Project num...
Background - Objective•High interests have been elicited from customers like Craft and Nestle for an integrated pourer for...
Existing oil/vinegar pourers14   Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Developme...
Market info• Products                                        Salad dressings, honey, maple syrup, Asian sauces, chilli    ...
30 MTO16   Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development   2012     Departme...
Launch info• Target market                         +XMpa from plastic injection moulding in glass                         ...
Musts• Easy and obvious to open and use.• Unique, giving brand differentiation.• Drip free pouring.• Suits existing cappin...
Desirables•    Require no extra processes on the filling line for longer term solution.•    Principle could be applied acr...
Project planIdea phase• Brief• Research• Brainstorm• Ideas• Review meeting• Gate                                   End Oct...
Project planFeasibility phase• Customer approval• Design for manufacture• Pilot tooling• Tooling iterations• Working proto...
Design work from the ideas phase tothe concept phaseThank you to Crown Packagingfor case study material !
Rejected Solutions• Restrictive aperture for controlled flow of product.• Air hole to create smoother flow.• Uses existing...
Rejected Solutions• Air tube for smoother pouring.• Premium, sophisticated appearance.• An addition rather than an integra...
Rejected Solutions• Spring loaded, retractable spout.• Air flow tube for smoother pouring.• Concealed beneath product pack...
Concept Alternatives...26   Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development   ...
Channelled Aperture• Post filling insertion.• Channelled aperture for a controlled flow.• Non drip rim.27   Original mater...
Centre Spout                                                      • Uses existing cap.                                    ...
Insertion options 1 Pre-fill – Inserted in the bottle before filling. 2 Post-fill – Inserted into the bottle after filling...
Flexible star•    Deeper metal cap•    Flexible lips allowing pre-filling insertion.•    Angled aperture for controlled fl...
Extended Spout •Post filling insertion. •Multi angle pouring. •Premium look spout. •Non drip rim.31   Original material by...
Extended Spout32   Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development   2012     ...
Two Piece• Both parts placed in cap, insertion during  capping.• Holding rim remains in cap after its  removal.• Non drip ...
Break Away• Single part placed in cap and is  inserted during capping.• Holding bridges break away when  inserting into ca...
Break Away• Single part placed in cap and is inserted  during capping.• Holding bridges break away when inserting  into ca...
Folding Arms•    Deep cap•    In-cap solution, inserted during capping.•    Non drip pouring rim.•    Concealed beneath ca...
Folding Arms•    Deep cap•    In-cap solution, inserted during capping.•    Non drip pouring rim.•    Concealed beneath ca...
Plastic rim•    Attached to cap and engaged during capping.•    Push-over notch to secure in position.•    Large centre sp...
Plastic rim•    Attached to cap and engaged during capping.•    Push-over notch to secure in position.•    Large centre sp...
Selection Criteria40   Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development   2012 ...
END OF CASE41   Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development   2012     Dep...
Where did the value lie?        No market differentiation or wow factor                             $$$$         Lighter...
Where did the value lie?        Less market differentiation                    $                                        ...
Questions                                                   ?44   Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 –...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

42629 lecture 3 pt2

496 views
432 views

Published on

The IPD Process: Product Case

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
496
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

42629 lecture 3 pt2

  1. 1. Integrated Product DevelopmentIntegrated Product Development ProcessThomas J. Howardhttps://sites.google.com/site/thomasjameshowardhomepage/thow@mek.dtu.dk Unless otherwise stated, this material is under a Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution–Share-Alike licence and can be freely modified, used and redistributed but only under the same licence and if including the following statement:“Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product DevelopmentDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark”
  2. 2. The three Key disciplines of IntegratedProduct Development (IPD) Market Product Business Production2 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  3. 3. The IPD model3 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  4. 4. Purposes, uses and limitations of theIPD model Purposes: The model will help you to understand IPD and will help you interpret progress and in NPD projects as well past projects Use: The model can be used as a checklist to identify the relative position of a project and any phases that may have been left out Limitations: The model will not tell you what to do next or which phases are most important to consider But mainly... it helps you an IPD mindset!4 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  5. 5. Case Study This case study will help you to relate the IPD model to a real situation It is also give you some idea of the type of documentation produced during a real development project (SLIDES WITH GREEN TITLES)5 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  6. 6. Setting the scene6 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  7. 7. Thank you to Crown Packagingfor case study material !
  8. 8. Project Brief Follow your integrated Product Development Process throughout this brief to understand how the development project is structure.8 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  9. 9. Team Members• Jerry Stimpson Closures Business• Jason Hegarty Closures Business• Brian Sequeira Closures BusinessBrainstorm team:• Chris Smith CT closures• Keith West CT closures• Chris Ramsey Innovation CT• Henry Ellis-Paul Innovation CT• Alexandre Paris Innovation CT• Thomas Howard Innovation CT9 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  10. 10. Mission statement “To produce an add-on component to enable a drizzle pouring function.”10 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  11. 11. Competitive advantage• Shape and functional differentiation. Unique with metal closure.• Salad dressing, marinades, sauces, honey, maple syrup closure with integral pourer (note that this is already on the oil or vinegar market).11 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  12. 12. Project approval• Issue 2• Date ******• Project number 824 765 0899 5300• Customer Companies like Craft and Nestle.• Brands Companies like Netto and Irma• Business contact Jason Hegarty• BI Ian Bucklow• CT team Thomas Howard (Project Lead) Chris Ramsey12 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  13. 13. Background - Objective•High interests have been elicited from customers like Craft and Nestle for an integrated pourer for the packs using metal closures.•It would allow them to offer a product with much more functionality while keeping their current capping facilities.13 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  14. 14. Existing oil/vinegar pourers14 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  15. 15. Market info• Products Salad dressings, honey, maple syrup, Asian sauces, chilli sauce…• Existing packaging Glass bottle with 43mm 38mm and 30mm Twist Off closures: – 43mm: RTO, RTB – 38mm: Regular RTB, RTP, medium MTB, MTP, deep DTB, DTP – 30mm: MTP, MTB, MTO – Pasteurisable compound – Tamper evidence shrink sleeve, tag, button – Decoration Decorated cap, sleeve – Serving size from sprinkle to pour. – Serving time Serving time variable.• Other packaging on market Glass and plastic bottles with/without integral pourers, metal &plastic caps, ROPP aluminium closures with insert. ***** is the only customer using insert in glass with a metal closure.• Market location launched in the UK, applicable to Europe• Outlets Supermarkets• Current market size 5-10 M p.a. ( between the 3 sizes / more 38mm than 30mm) 15 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  16. 16. 30 MTO16 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  17. 17. Launch info• Target market +XMpa from plastic injection moulding in glass (also potential large increase from plastic on plastic market if adaptable)• Target additional cost ~£XX/1000 increase on existing closure. Current 38 deep sold at ~£YY/1000. < 30-40% increase on existing closure.• Target launch Short term solution (6-8months): insert pushed in / longer term solution (few years): pourer integrated in cap.17 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  18. 18. Musts• Easy and obvious to open and use.• Unique, giving brand differentiation.• Drip free pouring.• Suits existing capping line with minimal changes (line speed 40-300 cpm). Small m/c to fit between filler and capper. 400N capping load.• Shelf stable for 2-3 years max.• Suits hot filling 85degC max.• Clean• Able to hold low vacuum.• Adaptable to a range of viscosities• Recyclable.• Organoleptic and alimentary approval – no effect from tainting or scalping.• No changes to the glass finish• Premium look (keep current high image of metal cap on glass).• Be customisable – flexible design.• Comply with current and future food contact regulations 18 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  19. 19. Desirables• Require no extra processes on the filling line for longer term solution.• Principle could be applied across a range of closures.• Patentable.• Suits steam flushing filling to pull vacuum.• Consumer can vary flow rate in a controlled way.• Integral TE19 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  20. 20. Project planIdea phase• Brief• Research• Brainstorm• Ideas• Review meeting• Gate End October 2008Concept phase (skipped if we select just one concept at Idea gate)• CAD design• FEA modelling & trials• Models & consumer sales research• Manufacturing routes & costs• Concept gate (select 1 concept)Supplier selection20 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  21. 21. Project planFeasibility phase• Customer approval• Design for manufacture• Pilot tooling• Tooling iterations• Working prototypeDevelopment phase• ROI & Customer funding• Production tool• Customer approval• Launch END OF BRIEF21 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  22. 22. Design work from the ideas phase tothe concept phaseThank you to Crown Packagingfor case study material !
  23. 23. Rejected Solutions• Restrictive aperture for controlled flow of product.• Air hole to create smoother flow.• Uses existing cap and it totally concealed.– Messy due to dripping.– Insecure housing.23 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  24. 24. Rejected Solutions• Air tube for smoother pouring.• Premium, sophisticated appearance.• An addition rather than an integrated solution.– Gives an unfamiliar brand image.– Difficult to position on product.– Expensive.24 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  25. 25. Rejected Solutions• Spring loaded, retractable spout.• Air flow tube for smoother pouring.• Concealed beneath product packaging.– Too many components. – Too expensive.25 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  26. 26. Concept Alternatives...26 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  27. 27. Channelled Aperture• Post filling insertion.• Channelled aperture for a controlled flow.• Non drip rim.27 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  28. 28. Centre Spout • Uses existing cap. • Post filling insertion. • Channelled aperture for a controlled flow. • Non drip rim.28 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  29. 29. Insertion options 1 Pre-fill – Inserted in the bottle before filling. 2 Post-fill – Inserted into the bottle after filling. 3 During capping – Inserted in cap and engaged into bottle during capping. Syrup Caps 3 Bottles 1 Filling 2 Capping Distribution29 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  30. 30. Flexible star• Deeper metal cap• Flexible lips allowing pre-filling insertion.• Angled aperture for controlled flow.• Non Drip pouring spout.• 1 Point pouring.30 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  31. 31. Extended Spout •Post filling insertion. •Multi angle pouring. •Premium look spout. •Non drip rim.31 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  32. 32. Extended Spout32 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  33. 33. Two Piece• Both parts placed in cap, insertion during capping.• Holding rim remains in cap after its removal.• Non drip pouring rim.• Concealed beneath cap.33 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  34. 34. Break Away• Single part placed in cap and is inserted during capping.• Holding bridges break away when inserting into cap.• Non drip pouring rim.• Concealed beneath cap. 34 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  35. 35. Break Away• Single part placed in cap and is inserted during capping.• Holding bridges break away when inserting into cap.• Non drip pouring rim.• Concealed beneath cap. 35 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  36. 36. Folding Arms• Deep cap• In-cap solution, inserted during capping.• Non drip pouring rim.• Concealed beneath cap.36 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  37. 37. Folding Arms• Deep cap• In-cap solution, inserted during capping.• Non drip pouring rim.• Concealed beneath cap.37 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  38. 38. Plastic rim• Attached to cap and engaged during capping.• Push-over notch to secure in position.• Large centre spout (non drip).• Plastic rim exposed on exterior.• Option to remove complete closure.38 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  39. 39. Plastic rim• Attached to cap and engaged during capping.• Push-over notch to secure in position.• Large centre spout (non drip).• Plastic rim exposed on exterior.• Option to remove complete closure.39 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  40. 40. Selection Criteria40 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  41. 41. END OF CASE41 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  42. 42. Where did the value lie?  No market differentiation or wow factor $$$$  Lighter, more sturdy, cheaper, better functioning product $  Cheaper, quicker and easier production $42 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  43. 43. Where did the value lie?  Less market differentiation $  $ Less functionality and convinience product  Cheaper, quicker and easier production $$$$43 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  44. 44. Questions ?44 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark

×