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Introduction to Prototyping

Introduction to Prototyping

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42629 lecture 12 pt1 42629 lecture 12 pt1 Presentation Transcript

  • Protovation - IntroductionThomas J. Howardhttps://sites.google.com/site/thomasjameshowardhomepage/thow@mek.dtu.dk Unless otherwise stated, this material is under a Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution–Share-Alike licence and can be freely modified, used and redistributed but only under the same licence and if including the following statement:“Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product DevelopmentDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark”
  • Agenda08:30 – Introduction to prototyping09:15 – Break09:30 – Market testing10:15 – Break10:30 – Technical feasibility11:15 – Break11:30 – Course round-up2 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • The three Key disciplines of:Integrated Product Development (IPD) Market’Need’Situation Product Business Production3 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • What are the remaining question marks andwhich are the biggest? Will they Do users pay that Is the ? want it ? much ? market ? ? ? that big ? Market Does it Does it work ? look good ? ? Product Desired Cost and’Need’Situation properties vol. of ? Business ? production ? ? Production4 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • Where are the big question marks ?5 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • Where are the big question marks ?6 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • • Geo Center • Professor Kurt S Anderson Lærke Holstebroe Jeanne Lønstrup7 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • EDGEFLOW Where are the big question marks ?8 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • What are your burning questions? Group A Group B Team 1 Team 2 Team 3 Team 4 Team 5 Team 6 Team 7 Team 8 Team 9 Team 10 Team 11 Team 12 Team 14 Team 15 Teams from Group A ask Teams from Group B about aspects of their project’s feasibility. Team B to LIST THE MAIN QUESTIONS. 5 mins Discuss which is THE BIGGEST QUESTION MARK identified. 2 mins Swap over.9 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • What is a Prototype ?10 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • A model to test an aspect of a product’s feasibility11 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • Types of prototypes – Proof-of-Principle Prototype – Form Study Prototype – User Experience Prototype – Visual Prototype – Functional Prototype http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prototype12 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • Proof-of-Principle PrototypeA proof of concept prototype is used to test some aspect of the intended design without attempting to exactly simulate the visual appearance, choice of materials or intended manufacturing process. Such prototypes can be used to "prove" out a potential design approach such as range of motion, mechanics, sensors, architecture, etc. These types of models are often used to identify which design options will not work, or where further development and testing is necessary.In electronics this is sometimes: “built on a breadboard”.13 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • Dyson – 5127 prototypes The hammer test When James started out he tested prototypes by dropping them down a cast iron stairway at the back of his workshop. Simple but effective. These days Dyson prototypes must endure 550 tests. Hoses are contorted and stretched. Cleaner heads are slammed into iron table legs. Performance is tested in temperatures as low as -20c in an environmental chamber. Things haven’t changed all that much though. Every 100th bin off the production line is whacked with a lump hammer just to make sure. http://content.dyson.co.uk/insidedyson/default.asp14 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • Form Study PrototypeThis type of prototype will allow designers to explore the basic size, look and feel of a product without simulating the actual function or exact visual appearance of the product. They can help assess ergonomic factors and provide insight into visual aspects of the products final form. Form Study Prototypes are often hand-carved or machined models from easily sculpted, inexpensive materials (e.g., urethane foam), without representing the intended colour, finish, or texture. Due to the materials used, these models are intended for internal decision making and are generally not durable enough or suitable for use by representative users or consumers.15 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • Form prototypes Cutting tools Dyson AirBlade http://www.dwell.com/articles/ Dyson-Airblade-process.html http://cmuid.tumblr.com/page/216 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • User Experience PrototypeA User Experience Model invites active human interaction and is primarily used to support user focused research. While intentionally not addressing possible aesthetic, this type of model more accurately represents the overall size, proportions, interfaces of a concept. This type of model allows early assessment of how a potential user interacts with various elements, motions, and actions of a concept which define the initial use scenario and overall user experience. As these models are fully intended to be used and handled, more robust construction is key. Materials typically include plywood, REN shape, RP processes and CNC machined components.17 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • User Experience18 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • Visual PrototypeTo capture the intended design aesthetic and simulate the appearance, colour and surface textures of the intended product but will not actually embody the function(s) of the final product. These models will be suitable for use in market research, executive reviews and approval, packaging mock-ups, and photo shoots for sales literature. Volvo 340 BMW 305 http://www.volvotips.com/index.php http://www.e90post.com/forums/sho /general/gallery/daf-museum/ wthread.php?t=15919 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • Functional PrototypeTo the greatest extent practical will attempt to simulate the final design, aesthetics, materials and functionality of the intended design. The functional prototype may be reduced in size (scaled down) in order to reduce costs. The construction of a fully working full-scale prototype and the ultimate test of concept, is the engineers final check for design flaws and allows last-minute improvements to be made before larger production runs are ordered.20 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • Advance Passenger Train (APT)21 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • Prototype Decomposition MIT course: 2.009 Product engineering processes22 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 23 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • Questions ? Course Evaluation!24 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark