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42629 lecture 1 pt4

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The Innovation Process …

The Innovation Process
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBtPYr4XiaY

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  • 1. The Innovation ProcessThomas J. Howardthow@mek.dtu.dk Unless otherwise stated, this material is under a Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution–Share-Alike licence and can be freely modified, used and redistributed but only under the same licence and if including the following statement:“Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product DevelopmentDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark”
  • 2. The Generic Design Process Howard, T. J., Culley, S. J., & Dekoninck, E. (2008). Describing the creative design process by the integration of engineering design and cognitive psychology literature. Design Studies, 29, 160-180.2 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 3. 3 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 4. Stage-Gate Model Stage-gate model R.Cooper4 Original material by Design Council© adapted byby R. Cooper The Stage-Gate Model Thomas J. Howard for course 42629: 2012 Innovation and Product Development Department of Mechanical Engineering, DTU
  • 5. The Scrum – Agile Product Development5 Original material by Design Council© adapted by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629: 2012 Innovation and Product Development Department of Mechanical Engineering, DTU
  • 6. The Double Diamond ProcessThe following content was adapted from a process developed by and owed under the copyright of the Design CouncilThe published work can be found here:Design Council, “Eleven lessons: managing design in eleven global brands”http://www.designcouncil.org.uk/documents/documents/publications/eleve n%20lessons/elevenlessons_design_council.pdf6 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 7. A Typical Development Processbreadth of perspective time 7 Original material by Design Council© adapted by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629: 2012 Innovation and Product Development Department of Mechanical Engineering, DTU
  • 8. Concept Generation Initial number of concepts based on PDS Apply controlledControlled convergence (CC) Convergent Stage (CS)Convergence Apply concept generation (CG) Divergent Stage (DS) (CS) (CC) (CG) (DS) (CS) (CC) (CG) (DS) (CS) (CC) Concept Selection8 Pugh S (1991). TOTAL DESIGN - INTEGRATED METHODS FOR SUCCESSFUL Original material by Design Council© adapted by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629: 2012 PRODUCT ENGINEERING. Strathclyde, Addison-Wesley Publishers Ltd. DTU Innovation and Product Development Department of Mechanical Engineering,
  • 9. A Typical Development Processbreadth of perspective ? time 9 Original material by Design Council© adapted by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629: 2012 Innovation and Product Development Department of Mechanical Engineering, DTU
  • 10. Where to start?•A problem?•A technology?•A market need?•A brand?•A process?•A service? An idea that provides an opportunity to capture value10 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 11. breadth of perspective Discover Phase: Thinking up as many opportunities as possible, developing them and combining them time 11 Original material by Design Council© adapted by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629: 2012 Innovation and Product Development Department of Mechanical Engineering, DTU
  • 12. DiscoverSources of Inspiration:• The problems you face in your own life or those observed in others• Innovation Challenges: https://www.innocentive.com/ar/challenge/browse• Campus Technologies: What DTU technologies are available for spinning out into a business in particular from DTU-Fotonic• Contact the commune to ask there social challenges and their areas greatest expenditure• Some great ideas from Ideo: http://www.openideo.com/open• Funding availability: http://innovationsradar.dk/radar• DTU-Fotoniks patents can be found listed here: http://www.fotonik.dtu.dk/Innovation/Patents.aspx• Your own creative thoughts.12 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 13. DiscoverBackground Research:• Where does the value reside?• How much is it worth and to who?• What other opportunities are associated? – Possibility for expansion• What are the future trends of the technology, market and user behaviour?• What products and services may result from Social, economic, legislative or environmental change?• Brainstorm and use mind maps to diverge.• Try to combine an build on opportunities.13 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 14. Mind Maps14 Original material by Design Council© adapted by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629: 2012 Innovation and Product Development Department of Mechanical Engineering, DTU
  • 15. breadth of perspective Define Phase: Rejecting less valuable opportunities and refining the formulation of promising ones. time 15 Original material by Design Council© adapted by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629: 2012 Innovation and Product Development Department of Mechanical Engineering, DTU
  • 16. Define:Partial List of Questions (Kepner-Tregoe)• What is the scope of the problem?• What is distinct about the problem?• Is it connected to other problems? How?• What events caused this problem?• How long has it existed?• Why is it a problem?• Who has been involved?• When and how was it discovered?• Where is it located?• What changes in surroundings, equipment, procedures, or personnel occurred that could possibly be related to the problem?• Does the problem pose a threat?• In what way?• Does it have long-term or short-term effects?• Can some of the factors be dealt with separately?• How would this affect the overall problem?16 Material adapted from “Entrepreneurship from Creativity to Innovation”, Lumsdaine and Binks 2012 for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development, DTU
  • 17. Define A quick and dirty approach to evaluate your business opportunities in the Define phase.17 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 18. Is it worth it?- A quick and dirty guide to killing your darlings. • Before convincing others (investors, partners, customers etc.) you should make sure that you have convinced yourself. • Initial validation and qualification of your idea and business is crucial for every subsequent step. • Before betting it all, look in to the following: o Who is my (first) customer? o Number of customers / market size? o How do I get there / Who and what do I need? Slide by Jakob Andersen18 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 19. First: The perfect Business Idea- A touch of utopia• My Idea and business plan has/is: • A "need to have" product/service for customers. • A huge market. • Fully scalable. • One size fits all. • Free (100% profit). • No risk in execution. • Ready tomorrow. • Better and cheaper than existing solutions. • Impossible to replicate. Slide by Jakob Andersen19 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 20. 1: Who is my (first) customer? • Who is going to buy my product • Are there segments? o And if so, which segment should I target first? • Why are these companies/organisations/ persons buying? o Perhaps specified by segment • How am I better or different? • Is the product and/or service: o "Nice to have" o "Need to have" • Leads to: What is my value proposition? Slide by Jakob Andersen20 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 21. 2: Number of customers /market size? • How many customers are there? o Include segments if relevant • Where are they? • Maybe I should look into: o National statistics o Sales from rivaling companies o Market intelligence o ... Be creative Slide by Jakob Andersen21 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 22. 3: How do I get there / Who and what do I need? • Identify the main barriers - are they manageable? • The biggest problems should be handled first o Reduce risk and validate business. • Can I come up with a realistic plan for this? • Do I have the competencies needed? o Can I out-/crowdsource? o Can I team up / form partnerships? • What amount of $ do I need? o When do I need the funds? Slide by Jakob Andersen22 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 23. breadth of perspective Problem/Opportunity Definition time 23 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 24. Definition of Opportunity• What is the essence of you idea?• Should be describable at several levels: – One sentence – Three sentences – One page – A business plan and technical document• Try to describe the main purpose of the design (from the users perspective) in a Verb and a Noun – To Verb Noun – To Squeeze Oranges, To Clean Windows, To Transport Children• Define the opportunity in the form of a Project Mission Statement (Be as solution neutral as possible!)24 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 25. Improving a Problem Definition (Example)Statement #1: Secondary school students have a hard time understanding the concept of centripetal force. Where is the spotlight?Statement #2: Design a mini merry-go-round that will let students experience centripetal force. Would a broader definition encourage other creative solutions?Statement #3: Teachers need an inexpensive device (presently unavailable) to use in the classroom to enable students to experience and experiment with rotational motion and the forces involved. This broader definition also provides some criteria.25 Material adapted from “Entrepreneurship from Creativity to Innovation”, Lumsdaine and Binks 2012 for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development, DTU
  • 26. Improving a Problem Definition (Exercise)Step #1: Think about a simple problem you have encountered recently. As a team, discuss and select one for the exercise. Write up a problem definition.Step #2: Pass the definition to another team. Improve the definition you have received by making it broader to encourage creative ideas.Step #3: Pass the definition to a third team. Try to incorporate evaluation criteria into the definition you received—what positive goals are you trying to accomplish?Step #4: Return the definition to the first team. Review the improvements and share the results with the class.26 Material adapted from “Entrepreneurship from Creativity to Innovation”, Lumsdaine and Binks 2012 for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development, DTU
  • 27. breadth of perspective Develop Phase: To generate as many feasible solutions to the problem as possible. time 27 Material adapted from “Entrepreneurship from Creativity to Innovation”, Lumsdaine and Binks 2012 for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development, DTU
  • 28. Develop•Imagine success or imagine the worst – this temporarily reframes the problem.•Force-fit two unrelated ideas – this can be played as a game with two teams.•Free association stimulates the imagination.•Big dream/wishful thinking can loosen up a practical-minded group.•Biomimetics (use analogy from nature).When creative ideas start flowing after applying one of thesetools, resume regular brainstorming of the defined problem.28 Material adapted from “Entrepreneurship from Creativity to Innovation”, Lumsdaine and Binks 2012 for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development, DTU
  • 29. DevelopSCAMPER Substitute Combine Adapt Magnify or Modify Put to Other Uses Eliminate Rearrange or Reverse See example at www.mindtools.com  PRACTICAL CREATIVITY  SCAMPER. This site has many tools for creative thinking.29 Material adapted from “Entrepreneurship from Creativity to Innovation”, Lumsdaine and Binks 2012 for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development, DTU
  • 30. breadth of perspective Deliver Phase: Evaluation, Selection and Validation of final design and business. time 30 Material adapted from “Entrepreneurship from Creativity to Innovation”, Lumsdaine and Binks 2012 for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development, DTU
  • 31. Deliver• Use of Pugh matrix to evaluate the design concepts against the selection criteria laid out in the specification.• Prototyping and testing of various aspects of the design an businessLAUNCH31 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 32. Questions ?32 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark
  • 33. For Friday• By Friday, remember to: – Register your 3 business ideas, and – fill in you Belbin tests• See you Friday in building 303A room 44 at 13:0033 Original material by Thomas J. Howard for course 42629 – Innovation and Product Development 2012 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark