Lecture 11 13 women president
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Lecture 11 13 women president

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  • This book (and us also) focuses on the electoral politics of electing a female president. The book does not really offer any hypothetical assessments on how women would act as president, beyond highlighting how stereotypes of this effect the possibility of being elected. The Executive office is MUCH MORE than the President. Your book does include some insights about women’s leadership in executive positions more broadly as a way to figure out if this is an indicator that cultural shifts are happening that allow for the election of a female president. We will talk more about women in executive branch more generally next Wed.
  • I do want to highlight the electoral college, which is the institution through which we elect the president. The book is not always clear about whether they are referencing the popular election or the primary. Clearly Clinton was unable to secure the Democratic nomination, though the battle, I believe, was longer and harder fought than anyone expected. Your book is written from a skeptical position, and others at the time Clinton began her race thought she was a sure winner, even within such a large pack of candidates. Why is this? At one point she had strong backing from party elites. Only after the prospect of having the party divided between elite votes and rank and file votes (primary contests for pledged delegates) at the convention did elites seem to gravitate in higher numbers to commit to supporting Obama. History matters. Clinton had the largest bank of early money, but lost that lead as the election progressed to being in the hole. Why? Difference between fewer large donors, who maxed out donation (Clinton) and many smaller donors, who you could ask for more money later (Obama). We will talk more about money on Wed. Individual votes– recap the primary race. Delegates versus totals The book focuses on the popular election side, but there is another dimension to keep in the back of your mind…. The electoral college is what counts in the general election.
  • But, as your book points out, other questions seem to indicate that this is not the case. The biggest concern is being able to handle military issues. The catch here is that support for military engagement fluctuates, and we may be seeing a down swing.
  • From the Roper Center…. Could this change the efforts to get an overly masculine president?
  • Using the analysis from the book… are these smart moves on the part of Hillary Clinton? Do you think they will be enough to counteract the cultural forces that the book highlights? Which?
  • From the Roper Center
  • Last time we spent a lot of time talking about the Electoral College, which is a central part of presidential elections, but is missing from this book. Remember that the president is not elected directly but instead is elected through the electoral college. Today we will talk about the other factors, starting with those aspects of a campaign that have the biggest impact on swaying individual votes. Then we will discuss money and party elites.
  • I complied this from the Lexis Nexis Academic Universe search engine for news stories. Note that the blog section is a small slice of all blogging that happens. It is only those blogs attached to news sources that Lexis tracks. Note this is not coded for negative or positive coverage, but just simply an idea of the amount of coverage in the last six months.
  • I complied this from the Lexis Nexis Academic Universe search engine for news stories. Note that the blog section is a small slice of all blogging that happens. It is only those blogs attached to news sources that Lexis tracks. Note this is not coded for negative or positive coverage, but just simply an idea of the amount of coverage in the last six months.
  • Gender– the cultural or social construction of sex. In our society is a division of the world into feminine and masculine, with a preferencing of masculine to hold power. Double bind– that to embody feminine counts against a woman because she doesn’t embody the traits of political institutions and to be too masculine counts against her since she is not upholding notions of what it is to be a woman. Transgendering– rendering an institution as being equally the purview of men and women. Allows women equal access and power. Great Man problem– our founding was based on the notion that women would be out and that not just any man, but a heroic one, would be the leader. Distrust of the common man.
  • In light of shifting feelings of the War in Iraq but the escalation of our relations elsewhere (Iran and Turkey)…. Do you think these predictions hold true? Why?
  • Do you think this prediction for the campaign trail is happening? How or why?
  • Parties are not just the national entities, but also include state and local entities, which are separate.
  • Obama did have about $1500 in pack money
  • We talked about this a little last week. Is Clinton a “Masculine” candidate? Does this make her more acceptable to the Democratic party? In other words does she fit the profile in Conroy’s article?
  • Social services, education….
  • At 20 min. to 37 min. mark for Tailhook and Women in combat

Lecture 11 13 women president Lecture 11 13 women president Presentation Transcript

  • Madam President? Gendering of an Institution
  • Some notes to begin
    • Electoral politics versus action in office
      • The book does not really offer any hypothetical assessments on how women would act as president, beyond highlighting how stereotypes of this effect the possibility of being elected.
    • The Executive office is MUCH MORE than the President.
      • Your book does include some insights about women’s leadership in executive positions more broadly as a way to figure out if this is an indicator that cultural shifts are happening that allow for the election of a female president.
  • What Does It Take to Win the Presidency?
    • I do want to highlight the electoral college, which is the institution through which we elect the president. The book is not always clear about whether they are referencing the popular election or the primary. Clearly Clinton was unable to secure the Democratic nomination, though the battle, I believe, was longer and harder fought than anyone expected. Your book is written from a skeptical position, and others at the time Clinton began her race thought she was a sure winner, even within such a large pack of candidates. Why is this?
    • Party support, particularly elites
      • Primary challenge lost
    • Money
    • Individual votes
    • The Electoral College
      • Sen. Clinton and E.C. predictors
  • Barriers to Office
    • Attitudinal– Voters attitudes and beliefs inform their choices.
      • Stereotypes of gender
      • Understanding of the presidency
    • Structural– Environmental factors and institutional factors that are necessary (but not always sufficient) to forge a successful path to office.
      • Party Support
      • Incumbency
  • The Masculine Presidency
    • Kerry
      • Defend America
      • Rassman
    • Negative Attack on Kerry
      • Windsailing
      • Global Test
    • Bush
      • Weapons
      • Wolves
    • Progress And Perils: How Gender Issues Unite & Divide Women Survey  [December, 2000]Some people think women have to make certain trade-offs to be successful in business or politics, while other people think these trade-offs are not necessary. I'm going to read a list of statements about possible trade-offs. For each one, please tell me whether you strongly agree, somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, or strongly disagree. How about...a woman can both be feminine and be in a position of power? Do you strongly agree, somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, or strongly disagree?    
  • But, as your book points out, other questions seem to indicate that this is not the case. The biggest concern is being able to handle military issues. The catch here is that support for military engagement fluctuates, and we may be seeing a down swing. Strongly Agree 75 Somewhat Agree 20 Somewhat Agree 3 Strongly Disagree 1 Don’t know/ Refused 1
  • Security as an Issue
  • Your book talks a lot about this show. Here examples.
    • President Mackenzie Allen
      • Clip 2
    • Geena Davis in her on the topic of culture, media and women.
    • Negotiation styles
      • Clip on Torture
    • Do you think Davis was sexualized in this role?
    • Is it possible for women to be portrayed as gender neutral? Can you think of such a character?
      • Does the idea of President Allen resonate with the possibility of Hillary Clinton as president? Sarah Palin?
  • From Heldman’s Chapter
    • “ Questions that include the word ‘qualified’ are actually measuring voter support for a female president who has magically transcended her gender ” (19).
    • Did Sen. Clinton do this or did her campaign play to gender stereotypes?
    • Sarah Palin?
    • Sen. Clinton keeps distance from the press.
    • Dealing with stereotypes?
    • Turning the tables? Efforts at negatively constructing “masculine” leadership.
  • Approval Ratings for President Bush
  •  
  •  
    • Do we construct Bush or Obama as masculine or feminine?
    • Do you think this impacts approval of leadership? Is there a different narrative here?
  • Questions
    • Does the literature on congressional campaigning and politics that we have read provide support or detract from the claims made by the authors of Rethinking Madam President ? Which claims are supported and which detracted? Explain.
    • Does Sen. Clinton’s campaign conform or not to the theories presented in the reading? What aspects of her campaign reinforce or provide examples from the reading? What aspects offer exceptions?
    • Does the book adequately include considerations about the unique nature of the Electoral College? How would these considerations change the predictions provided?
  • Madam President On the Campaign Trail
  • What Does It Take to Win the Presidency?
    • Electoral College
    • Individual votes
      • Media coverage
      • Gender stereotypes of candidates and the institution
    • Money
    • Party support, particularly elites
  • Media Coverage Summer and Fall 2007 Coverage From Lexis Nexis Search Clinton Obama Edwards Dodd Richardson Major US/ World Publ. 977 999 998 996 996 TV/ Radio Transcr. 962 996 978 983 997 Blogs 1000 947 768 283 375
  • Giuliani Romney McCain Huckabee Major US/ World Publ. 464 293 115 227 TV/ Radio Transcr. 471 453 858 621 Blogs 66 256 29 172
  • Media Coverage: The case for why Hillary will not be the next VEEP Last week’s c overage from Lexis Nexis search Clinton Obama McCain Major US/ World Publ. 144 993 960 TV/ Radio Transcr. 183 1000+ 1000+ Blogs 138 1000+ 1000+
    • What do we mean by gender?
    • What is the double bind for women politicians?
    • What is transgendering of an institution? How does this help?
      • The problem of the “Great Man.”
  • Environment Matters: A subtitle for Duerst-Lahti
    • What stereotypes or gendering is attached to the main events and foci of the campaign (and thus the words attached).
    • “ The 2008 election will likely be framed in terms similar to 2004, unless the United States has ended the war on terror and extricated itself from both Afghanistan and Iraq. Therefore we can particularly anticipate continued heavy use of the words derived from wildcards for attack, strength, and hardness.” (103)
    • What do you think– true or not?
  • Change in Gender Climate?
    • “ Tough talk, which so dominated the presidency since 9/11, may finally be recognized as having a downside and framed by the press as such. If so, perhaps, just perhaps, the campaign trail will evoke less masculinity in 2008.” (111)
    • Impact for voters and stereotyping?
    • Do you think any of this has changed over the last year?
    • Would Palin have an easier time in a bid for the presidency than Clinton? Why or why not– using the ideas from the reading?
  • What Money Gets You
    • Name recognition
    • Networks/ support
    • Campaign organization
    • Backing of party
    • Credibility
    • Resume
  • Individual Contributions Democratic Primary
  •  
  • Primary Election Contributions
  •  
  • Party
    • Clinton as a masculine candidate?
    • http://www.fec.gov/DisclosureSearch/mapApp.do
  • Madam President Lessons from Challenges of Executive leadership
  • The Executive Office as more than the President.
    • Hierarchical division of executive responsibilities into departments and agencies, with the U.S. President at the chief executive officer. This is what comprises the bureaucracy.
    • Current Cabinet
    • Some areas of the bureaucracy women have had more success in gaining access.
      • Guess to which?
  • Why focus on military ?
    • Source of perceptions of women’s ability to be commander in chief.
    • Perhaps the first step to a woman president must be normalizing women’s presence in the military
    • More than just changing formal combat status– have to deal with the same attitudinal barriers discussed throughout the book
    • Are the consequences of persistent attitudinal barriers in the military worse?
  • Realities of Women in the Masculine Executive Branch
    • Secretary of State
      • Madeline Albright
      • Condelezza Rice
      • Hillary Clinton
    • Secretary of Homeland Security, Janet Napolitano
    • Tailhook and Women in Combat
    • Rape and women in the military