2011 LatinoOHIO DIVERSITYTALENT & LEADERSHIPCONFERENCEEducate | Connect | Celebrate                    HYATT REGENCY HOTEL...

Nationwide is proud to sponsor the 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference and pleased tohelp bring t...
A culture                  of diversity                  and inclusion                  Cardinal Health is proud to suppor...


Cardinal Health is honored to be a title sponsor of the 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Confer-ence. Ou...
Diversity & Inclusion is Not About Counting Heads ...It Is About Making Heads Count!        Empleos & Employment is your s...
Table of contentsLetter from Title Sponsor: Nationwide Insurance ............................................................
Time Warner Cable believes in diversity                                          and inclusion in all aspects of work and ...

    
    Dear colleagues and friends,    ¡Bienvenidos a todos! Welcome one and all. On behalf of Empleos & Employment, I ...
AT LIMITED BRANDS,WE CHERISH OUR DIVERSITY.We’re committed to developing and retaining a diverse and talented workforce th...
Conference Agenda 2011    Morning                                         Afternoon7:00AM - 8:15AM                        ...
Latino Affairs                                                           Commission                                       ...
Planning CommitteeAida Sabo                                           Guadalupe A. VelasquezVP of Diversity and Inclusion ...
MY SKILLS ARE EXCEPTIONAL.    MY SKILLS ARE EXCEPTIONAL.  MY IDEAS APPRECIATED. MY IDEAS APPRECIATED.                     ...
Empleos & Employment 13
14 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
Keynote Speaker              Empleos & Employment 15
Bilingual Associates Wanted.                                                                        (Not To Mention Genero...
Additional Speaker             Key Note Speakers                                        Pegine EchevarriaNew York Newsday ...
Making A Difference                          Alejandro Rodriguez A native of Cuba, Alejandro Rodriguez immigrated to the U...
NETWORK. ADVOCATE.                LEON                                             EDUCATE. APOYO. COMMUNIDAD             ...
Madrina Award               Karen M. FasheunEmpleos and Employment and the Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Con...
Inclusion, Diversity, Innovation   At Honda, we are committed to working alongside diverse suppliers. We are constantly se...
Making A Difference                          JUAN MEDINA Juan Medina is the Director of Marketing for Home Health and Surg...
Are you HIRING?        Consider using Empleos & Employment job posting website.        A dedicated online resource to help...
Rising Latina            Darsy AmayaEmpleos & Employment, conference committee members, sponsors and the Hispanic Chamber ...
26 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
MAP
          Registration                         Empleos & Employment 27
2011 Conference tracks    Five conference tracks have been designed and developed to meet the needs of our diverse audienc...
OutReach & retention Track                                                                                                ...
Leadership Development Track                                                                                              ...
Entrepreneurship Research and        Development Track Room: Franklin BParticipants will learn the importance of research,...
Inclusion Track                                                                                     Room: Fairfield   The ...
Mujeres (women) Track                                                                                                    R...
Additional Speakers                                       Dr. Samuel Betances, Senior Diversity Consultant                ...
Ohio Latino Demographics                                                                                                  ...
As the fastest growing segment of the United States and its labor force, Latinos are integral to the nation’s eco-    nomi...
Relationship between National and Local DataNationwide, data on Latinos indicate that the country is in the midst of a dra...
1                                                                                                   FOR FURTHER INFORMATIO...
2                                   Census 2010: 50 Million Latinosmillion Hispanics, identified themselves as “some other...
3                                         Census 2010: 50 Million Latinos    In six states, growth in the Hispanic populat...
4                                               Census 2010: 50 Million LatinosAppendix: Additional Charts and Tables     ...
5                                                 Census 2010: 50 Million Latinos    Figure 1                             ...
6                                              Census 2010: 50 Million LatinosTable 6: Hispanic Population by State, 2010 ...
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference
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2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference

  1. 1. 2011 LatinoOHIO DIVERSITYTALENT & LEADERSHIPCONFERENCEEducate | Connect | Celebrate HYATT REGENCY HOTEL September 20, 2011 Columbus,OHIO
  2. 2. 
Nationwide is proud to sponsor the 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference and pleased tohelp bring this conference to central Ohio once again.The Latino community in central Ohio represents one of the fastest growing in the state, and Nationwide is excitedabout the wealth of talent that it brings to Columbus.This year’s conference will focus on issues related to the recruitment, mentorship, and advancement of Latinos andother minorities in the workplace. I am excited that conference attendees will walk away with tools and practicaladvice to promote leadership development, cross-cultural competency and professional growth for all participantsOur sponsorship of the 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference is just one way we demon-strate our promise – Esta de Su Lado.Our promise is personal – with each interaction – every day. We want our customers and associates to know thatwe understand and value them. So for Nationwide, it is natural to collaborate with Empleos & Employment andother organizations to help bring this important conference to the region.We congratulate our friends and partners at Empleos & Employment for having the foresight to create the 2011Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference and look forward to a successful 2011 event!Sincerely, 
Candice BarnhardtChief Diversity OfficerNationwide Insurance Empleos & Employment 1
  3. 3. A culture of diversity and inclusion Cardinal Health is proud to support the 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference. At Cardinal Health, our employees know how important it is for hospitals, pharmacies, labs and physician offices to have what they need to provide the best care possible. And we know that the diverse experiences, ideas and backgrounds our employees bring to work every day are key to the innovations we bring to healthcare. We believe that great talent working together and the value of each employee’s unique perspective are what help us make healthcare safer and more productive. cardinalhealth.com © 2011 Cardinal Health. All rights reserved. CARDINAL HEALTH, the Cardinal Health LOGO, and Essential to care are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cardinal Health. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. Lit. No. 5DI6941 (07/2011)2 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
  4. 4. 

Cardinal Health is honored to be a title sponsor of the 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Confer-ence. Our involvement since its inception three years ago is something we note with pride and look forward tocontinuing each year.At Cardinal Health, we make health care more cost-effective so our customers can focus on their patients. To helpus do this, we recognize the differences that each of our employees brings to the workplace and we leverage theirunique contributions, ideas and perspectives to create an inclusive work environment.As a board member for the Ohio Latino Conference and member of the conference planning committee, I have anopportunity to be a part of something of that I believe is profoundly important. The recruitment, mentorship andadvancement of Latinos and other minorities in the workplace is essential to our businesses and it’s critical for ourcommunities.The Hispanic American Network is an employee group that promotes Hispanic culture within Cardinal Health.This enriches our work environment, develops leaders, and raises awareness. We provide mentors and sponsorsto advance Hispanic leadership at Cardinal Health. We partner with community organizations for development,outreach and recruitment efforts in the Latino community.In today’s marketplace, diversity is not only a strategic advantage, but also a driver of great performance and anessential contributor to growth. We must take affirmative steps to make sure that our workplace accurately reflectsthe marketplace where we do business. The Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference provides amuch-needed space for us to come together and work towards this important goal.Cardinal Health is thrilled to have the opportunity to contribute to the successful conference Empleos and Em-ployment and the Ohio Commission of Latino Affairs bring to the area each year. Here’s to an outstanding 2011conference!Sincerely,Aida SaboVice President of DiversityCardinal Health Empleos & Employment 3
  5. 5. Diversity & Inclusion is Not About Counting Heads ...It Is About Making Heads Count! Empleos & Employment is your source for: • Cultural Competency Training • Diversity & Inclusion Training • Latino Talent Acquisition • Translations and Interpretations Services • Employee Resource Group Support • Community Outreach • Job Postings/AdvertisementsEmpleos and Employment and their associates work with public and private organizations of all sizes. Let us help with your diversity and inclusion needs! w w w. e e - i n d e x . c o m 6 1 4 - 7 9 0 - 8 8 9 4
  6. 6. Table of contentsLetter from Title Sponsor: Nationwide Insurance ..............................................................................................................1Letter from Title Sponsor: Cardinal Health ........................................................................................................................3Welcome Message: Cristina Villacinda-Farr .......................................................................................................................7Conference Agenda ................................................................................................................................................................9Conference Planning Committee Members ......................................................................................................................11Mayor Michael B. Coleman Recognition Letter ...............................................................................................................13Governor John R. Kasich Recognition Letter ...................................................................................................................15Keynote Speaker: Pegine Echevarria .................................................................................................................................17Making a Difference: Alejandro Rodriguez ......................................................................................................................19Madrina Award: Karen Fasheun .........................................................................................................................................21Making a Difference: Juan Medina .....................................................................................................................................23Rising Latina: Darsy Amaya ................................................................................................................................................252nd Floor Map .......................................................................................................................................................................272011 Conference Track Information ..................................................................................................................................28Track 1: Outreach and Retention .......................................................................................................................................29Track 2: Talent and Leadership Development ..................................................................................................................30Track 3- Entrepreneurship Development ..........................................................................................................................31Track 4- Inclusion .................................................................................................................................................................32Track 5- Mujeres ...................................................................................................................................................................33Additional Speakers .............................................................................................................................................................34Ohio Latino Demographics Report ..............................................................................................................................35-372010 Latino Census Report by Pew Research Center..................................................................................................38-46Notes .................................................................................................................................................................................47-49Recommended Reading .......................................................................................................................................................50Hispanic/Latino Organizations on the Web .....................................................................................................................51List of Ohio Hispanic Chambers of Commerce ...............................................................................................................52About The Artist (cover page) ............................................................................................................................................542010 Conference Photo Page ..............................................................................................................................................55About US: Empleos & Employment ..................................................................................................................................56 Empleos & Employment 5
  7. 7. Time Warner Cable believes in diversity and inclusion in all aspects of work and life. We are proud to be a sponsor of the 3rd Annual 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference www.timewarnercable.com0711-HR latin conf prog ad FINAL.indd 1 7/13/11 2:15 PM
  8. 8. 
 
 Dear colleagues and friends, ¡Bienvenidos a todos! Welcome one and all. On behalf of Empleos & Employment, I am delighted to welcome you to the Third Annual Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference. The Latino population has become the fastest growing ethnic group in Ohio and the United States. The 2010 census informa- tion demonstrates numbers that we can’t ignore. Latinos now make up 50.5 million of the US population, with 354 thousand in Ohio. Latinos play an increasingly important role in our economy, government and politics, and are influential across a wide range of cultural domains. We have an incredible pool of educated Latinos professionals here in Ohio. Our philosophy on diversity and inclusion is that in order to see change, we must change too. We believe that diversity begins with ourselves, as we learn how to be more culturally competent and develop genuine relationships with people who are different from us. This conference was developed to help create partnerships, expand networks, promote collaboration and grow competencies among all attendees. Today we will explore issues and practices relating to recruitment, mentorship, business development and advancement of Latinos and other emerging groups. We will also address cultural understanding, myths, misconcep- tions, and laws as they apply to minorities in the workplace. Our goal today is to celebrate Hispanic Heritage month, advocate for the cause of diversity and to educate and connect with each other. We would like to express our heart-felt gratitude to our planning committee members, who represent our main sponsors, local and state Latino community leaders, as well as our many supporters and community partners. We are grateful for their commitment to diversity and inclusion. We also thank all of the speakers, panelists, presenters, volunteers and professionals and community members in attendance today. Your participation has been vital to the success of this event. We couldn’t have done it without your support and we want you to know that we appreciate you! What happens in this conference must not stay here. Ideas and strategies that address talent development, business opportu- nities and promote cultural competence must be shared with our colleagues, partners and friends. Again, thank you for joining us in celebrating diversity and our heritage! By working together, we can build bridges of under- standing, remove walls of separation and create opportunities for us to reach our highest potential as individuals, organiza- tions, communities and society, as a whole. Sincerely,
 Cristina Villacinda-Farr Founder and President Empleos & Employment, LLC Empleos & Employment 7
  9. 9. AT LIMITED BRANDS,WE CHERISH OUR DIVERSITY.We’re committed to developing and retaining a diverse and talented workforce that reflectsthe communities where we live and work—that means people from different academicbackgrounds, ages, cultures, life circumstances, thinking styles and interests. We believeembracing others’ thoughts, experiences, hopes and dreams makes our own more completeand connects us to our customers.A proud sponsor of the 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference.Limitedbrands VICTORIA’S SECRET / BATH & BODY WORKS / PINK / LA SENZA HENRI BENDEL / WHITE BARN CANDLE CO. / C.O. BIGELOW
  10. 10. Conference Agenda 2011  Morning Afternoon7:00AM - 8:15AM 11:50AM - 12:20PM • Union RoomCheck in • Breakfast • Exhibits Lunch Musical Presentation8:15AM - 8:55AM • Union Room Co-Title Sponsors Presentation and AwardColor Guard and Pledge of Alliance Recognition by Governor’s OfficeWelcome by: Cristina Villacinda-Farr Sponsors AwardArtwork and Artist Presentation Making a Difference Award by: Title SponsorsRising Latina SpeakerRecognition by City of Columbus: 12:20PM - 1:30PM • Union RoomMayor Michael B. Coleman Keynote Introduction by: Dr. Samuel BetancesMadrina Award by: Patricio Plazolles Keynote Address: Pegine Echevarria Q&A8:55AM - 9:20AM • Union RoomCensus Report by Richard Fry, Pew Hispanic Center 1:30PM - 1:40PM Break • Exhibits • Musical Presentation9:20AM - 9:30AMBreak • Exhibits • Musical Presentation 1:40PM - 2:40PM Concurrent Session 39:30AM - 10:30AMConcurrent Session 1 2:40PM - 2:50PM Break • Exhibits • Musical Presentation10:30AM - 10:40AMBreak • Exhibits • Musical Presentation Closing 2:50PM - 4:00PM • Union Room10:40AM - 11:40AM General Panel Discussion: Ask the ExpertsConcurrent Session 2 Dr. Samuel Betances, Pegine Echevarria, Elba Montalvo, Alan Nevel, Paula S. Carter11:40AM - 11:50AMBreak • Exhibits • Musical Presentation  Networking • Private Dining Room 4:00PM - 5:00pm Empleos & Employment 9
  11. 11. Latino Affairs Commission is proud to support: The 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference Advise. Connect. Build. The purpose of the Ohio Commission on Hispanic/Latino Affairs is to advise state government on issues affecting Hispanic Ohioans, to connect the diverse Latino communities across the state, and to build the capacity of community organizations so they may better serve the growing Latino population of Ohio. The Commission serves as a liaison between government and the Hispanic/Latino community in Ohio and advocates the development and implementation of policies and programs to address the needs of the Hispanic/Latino Ohioans, especially but not limited to education, employment, economic development, health and housing. History The Commission was created by Legislative Act and signed into Law by Governor James Rhodes on July 8, 1977. Office & Interagency Council The Office has three program offices, the Public Policy Center, the Latino Community Network, and the Organizations Development Center. For more information, please call our offices at (614) 466-8333 or e-mail us at: olanet@ochla.state.oh.us 201110 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
  12. 12. Planning CommitteeAida Sabo Guadalupe A. VelasquezVP of Diversity and Inclusion New Americans CoordinatorCardinal Health City of ColumbusPaula S. Carter Lair MarinManager and Procurement Diversity Office Manager and Community OutreachHonda of America Mfg., Inc. Ohio Latino Affairs CommissionKaren M. Fasheun Kenny RamosMidwest Region Manager Diversity, Inclusion and PresidentDevelopment The Hispanic Chamber of ColumbusTime Warner Cable Yen HannahAlan K. Nevel Consultant, Diversity and InclusionDirector, Diversity and Inclusion NationwideLimited Brands Elizabeth MartinezPatricio F. Plazolles VP of School-Based and Hispanic MentoringProgram Officer, Economics, Business and Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central OhioEntrepreneurshipOhio Wesleyan University Nathan A. Farr PartnerFrancisco-Xavier Gómez-Bellengé Empleos & Employment LLCAssociate to the Dean, Fisher College of BusinessThe Ohio State University Cristina Villacinda President/CEOBrandi Young-Sharp Empleos & Employment LLCPresidentAdvanced Language Access, Inc. Keith T. Bolin Human Resources Analyst - Talent AcquisitionLilleana Cavanaugh Verizon WirelessExecutive DirectorOhio Latino Affairs Commission Joe Altieri Partner Motus Advertising Empleos & Employment 11
  13. 13. MY SKILLS ARE EXCEPTIONAL. MY SKILLS ARE EXCEPTIONAL. MY IDEAS APPRECIATED. MY IDEAS APPRECIATED. AND REWARDED. AND REWARDED.Youll do do more than feed our customers – youll feed your passion. For challenge. Youll more than feed our customers – youll feed your passion. For challenge. For learning. For evolving. For realizing your goals. You have the creativity.For learning. For evolving. For realizing your goals. You have the creativity. The vision. You have the now.The vision. You have the now. Careers For Everything You AreCareers For Everything You Are Enjoy benefits worthy ofof the Enjoy benefits worthy the name Total Rewards, including name Total Rewards, including medical, dental and vision from medical, dental and vision from day one, 401(k), paid vacation day one, 401(k), paid vacation and holidays, and more. and holidays, and more. Visit vzwcareers4you.com Visit vzwcareers4you.com toto apply today. apply today. Must apply online in in order to Must apply online order to bebe considered. considered. Verizon Wireless is an an Verizon Wireless is equal opportunity employer equal opportunity employer m/f/d/v. m/f/d/v.
  14. 14. Empleos & Employment 13
  15. 15. 14 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
  16. 16. Keynote Speaker Empleos & Employment 15
  17. 17. Bilingual Associates Wanted. (Not To Mention Generously Compensated, Respected And Adored.) We’re seeking candidates with Spanish/English fluency for our sales, claims and customer service departments. Along with the opportunity for advancement, we offer a long list of benefits. So if you’ve been looking for a job, aim a little higher. And consider a career at Safe Auto Insurance instead. Visit safeauto.com/about/bilingual. It could translate into the opportunity of a lifetime. Wendys Latino Leadership Conf Ad_Layout 1 7/12/11 11:45 AM Page 1 Wendy’s is proud to support the Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference ©2011 Oldemark LLC. Wendy’s name, design and logo are registered trademarks of Oldemark LLC and are licensed to Wendy’s International, Inc.16 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
  18. 18. Additional Speaker Key Note Speakers Pegine EchevarriaNew York Newsday calls Pegine Echevarria “a walking one-woman antidote to workplace cynicism.” Feisty andfun, Pegine Echevarria is one of 58 inductees into the prestigious Motivational Speakers Hall of Fame (awarded byGetMotivation.com) that includes luminaries Zig Ziglar, Dale Carnegie and Tony Robbins. The Society of HumanResource Management (SHRM) named her one of 100 Global Thought Leaders on Diversity and Inclusion.The author of “Sometimes You Need to Kick Your Own Butt and the creator of the corporate licensed programWhite Guys Are Diverse Too (TM), her newest book, “Lighten Up And Lead – How to be a Fun, Feisty, Focused,Fearless Female Leader”.Her quotes appear in the Wall Street Journal, HR Magazine, Go! Air Tran Magazine, Washington Post, NY Times,Latina, Health and BusinessWeek. Television and radio appearances include on NPR Fresh Air, CNN and MSNBC.She has appeared as the on air personality for NewsTalk Television, as their workplace expert regarding womenand minorities. Appearing on Montel Williams 32 times, he won his first Emmy thanks to a “Pegine moment”.Pegine has had the privilege of presenting on the stage with such notables as Maya Angelou, John Maxwell, SuzeOrman, Barbara Stanny, then Senators Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama as well as President Clinton.She holds an MSW in group and organizational behavior and has received numerous awards for her work on di-versity and leadership. Empleos & Employment 17
  19. 19. Making A Difference Alejandro Rodriguez A native of Cuba, Alejandro Rodriguez immigrated to the United States in the early sixties and has called central Ohio home since 1964. In addition to an ac- tive role in his church, he also serves as president of the board of the Spirituality Network, an ecumenical organization that seeks to fulfill spiritual needs not met in more traditional ways. Alejandro also serves as an at-large member of the Parents Advisory Council for Ohio University. Alejandro was board chairperson and continues to support VOICEcorps reading service, which provides audio access to current news for people with visual impairments and other disabilities. He recently served on the governance committee of the Ohio Literacy Network, which is engaged in impacting adult literacy concerns, including English as a Second Language programs, and support for attainment of high school equiva- lency degrees. Alejandro Rodriguez has more than 25 years experience with Nationwide In- surance, primarily in human resources and communications. He currently leads change management and creative services for Nationwide Talent Management organization, where he partners with leaders to define and implement strategies, goals and processes for the greatest business impact. As the vice president for the National Latino Alliance associate resource group at Nationwide, he is engaged in developing Latino talent, as well as highlighting Latino culture and supporting the local Latino community. Empleos & Employment 19
  20. 20. NETWORK. ADVOCATE. LEON EDUCATE. APOYO. COMMUNIDAD Latino Empowerment Outreach Network        LEON is proud to be a partner of the 2010 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference. Upcoming Events • Columbus Diversity Latino Job Fair (Spring 2012) • Become an effective public speaker with Dr. Betances (Spring 2012) • African Americans and Latinos: Cultural Competencies (Fall 2011)20 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
  21. 21. Madrina Award Karen M. FasheunEmpleos and Employment and the Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Leadership Conference is proud to announce Ms. Karen M. Fasheun as this year’srecipientof the “MADRINA” award.To become a “Madrina” in Latino families is an important event and time honored tradition; it represents the great responsibility of a lifetime of com-mitment. Madrinas are chosen for their character, integrity and example of living cherished principles and values. Madrinas serve as role models andare entrusted by the family with mentoring, guiding, encouraging and even assuming the role of mother in case the parents become deceased. It is notan easy decision to make and not an easy decision to accept. Once the parents and the Madrina agree, everyone in the community celebrates the eventand shares the good news.Karen M. Fasheun earned a bachelor’s degree and completed masters level coursework in International Studies at Ohio University. After graduation,Karen travelled through West Africa, living in the country of Nigeria where she gained appreciation for the women that ran the economy of the market-place and cottage industries in Lagos. This influenced her work with women-owned cooperatives upon her return to the United States.Throughout her 30 year career, she has demonstrated leadership in collaborative program development partnering across racial, ethnic, cultural, reli-gious, socio/economic, disabled, gender, mutigenerational and GLBT communities.Karen spent most of her professional career working in higher education directing programs focused on multicultural enrollment, retention, and fund-raising, diversity initiatives for students, faculty, and profit and nonprofit organizations while serving at Ohio University, Ohio Wesleyan University, andthe Ohio State University. During her career in higher education, Karen was responsible for creating strategic enrollment plans, leading highly successfulacademic scholarship programs for students of color, leadership training, and creating programming to enhance learning of cultural and racial differ-ences focused on building a common community.In 2005 Karen joined Time Warner Cable. She currently leads the overall management of a comprehensive diversity and inclusion program to improvebusiness by engaging employees and educating customers concerning diversity and inclusion for the states of Ohio, Missouri, Nebraska, Wisconsin,Kansas, West Virginia, Kentucky, and Indiana. Highlights of the strategic plan include supplier diversity, diversity and inclusion training, diverse talentacquisition, mentoring programs, employee resource groups, disability awareness training and oversight for the diversity and inclusion councils.Karen has been a contributor to the success of many conferences and community organizations and currently is a mentor with the Latina MentoringAcademy, sponsored by the Hispanic Chamber of Columbus. She has served on the planning committee for the Ohio Diversity Latino Talent and Lead-ership Conference for three years.Most recently, Karen has found her greatest interest in the area of multigenerational workforce development and disability awareness. Her passion isconnecting people with one another and often hosts networking events at her home connecting women from across the city representing a wide diversityof backgrounds and life experience.“I experience my best life through connecting people to the tools for their success – so that they are able to live their best life – in the end we all win...“We experience our best life by sharing it and together, only then are we able to build a bridge to understanding one another.” – Karen M. FasheunKaren M. Fasheun lives the good values and principles espoused in this conference, a true mentor and champion of diversity. She is a friend and Madrinaof the Latino Community. Empleos & Employment 21
  22. 22. Inclusion, Diversity, Innovation At Honda, we are committed to working alongside diverse suppliers. We are constantly searching for those who share our vision, support our business operations, inspire creativity and strengthen the communities in which they work and live.We embrace the passion of those who desire to work together as partners, to encourage inspired limitless growth, technological advancement and innovation. We are looking for those who want to build upon it together. The power is in your hands. Honda North American Purchasing Raymond, Ohio www.ohio.honda.com For more information contact Paula Carter at paula_carter@ham.honda.com
  23. 23. Making A Difference JUAN MEDINA Juan Medina is the Director of Marketing for Home Health and Surgery Center at Cardinal Health. Juan has worked at Cardinal Health since 2005 in various roles including Corporate Strategy, Mergers and Acquisitions and Channel Mar- keting.  He received his B.A. in Economics from the University of Delaware and MBA from the University Of Chicago Booth School Of Business. Juan Medina has been instrumental in leading the formation of the Columbus Chapter of ALPFA, the largest professional organization for Hispanics in the U.S. He has served as President of the local chapter since 2010. Juan also served for three years as Co-Chair of the Hispanic Employee Network at Cardinal Health.  In this capacity he worked on various projects to ensure Cardinal Health is a Best Place to work for Hispanics and has also participated in various other commu- nity outreach programs. Empleos & Employment 23
  24. 24. Are you HIRING? Consider using Empleos & Employment job posting website. A dedicated online resource to help employers and bilingual job seekers come together, with each achieving what they want... the best candidates placed in the best jobs. Online Job Postings $225 for 60 days - Access to Ohio bilingual talent - Easy to use - Professional and friendly customer service - Great online Traffic - Additional Job posting through, Facebook, Twitter - Inclusion in monthly Empleos e-newsletter www.ee-index.com (614)790-8894 ~ info@ee-index.com24 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
  25. 25. Rising Latina Darsy AmayaEmpleos & Employment, conference committee members, sponsors and the Hispanic Chamber of Columbus areproud to recognize Ms. Darsy Amaya as the 2011 Emerging Latina Talent.Darsy and five other Latinas from the Hispanic Chamber of Columbus 2011 Latina Mentoring Academy partici-pated in an essay competition. Darsy was selected to be our rising speaker for this year’s conference.Darsy was born and raised for most of her childhood in San Pedro, Honduras, later moving to Queens, New York.It was during the ‘90’s that she discovered her love for working with the community. She practiced her passion asa caregiver by working with several volunteer organizations in the health care industry and child care field. Afterher move to Columbus Ohio in 2001, Darsy became a certified medical interpreter at Nationwide Children’s Hos-pital where she is currently employed. This position was made possible due to her previous work experience inthe medical field in combination with her bilingual skills, and love for her culture.Through the daily interaction with patients at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Darsy became aware of the urgentneed in the community to educate Latinos by utilizing media. Later she secured an internship with the Telemun-do Network. There she discovered her path – it was on the other side of the camera as a TV host. Her messageprovides awareness on topics such as immigration, health care, and cultural activities.She is well known and respected in Central Ohio. Darsy’s compassion for Latino culture and community is evi-dent. She continues to search for better ways to break language barriers and educate across cultures. Her goal isto help facilitate others to get to the life we all deserve to live. Empleos & Employment 25
  26. 26. 26 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
  27. 27. MAP
 Registration Empleos & Employment 27
  28. 28. 2011 Conference tracks Five conference tracks have been designed and developed to meet the needs of our diverse audience. Each track has three different workshops presented by experts and professionals in different fields. Outreach and Retention Track The Outreach and Retention Track provides tools to manage outreach, acquisition, retention of talent and the development of an inclusive climate within the organization. The target audience for this track includes human resource professionals, manager, executives, diversity & inclusion professionals and college diversity & inclusion administrators. Leadership Development Track The Leadership Development Track will provide tools to increase participants’ ability to lead and influence their respective organizations. The target audience for this track includes corporate employees, human resource and diversity & inclusion professionals, managers and executives. Entrepreneurship Research and Development Track Participants will learn the importance of research, benchmarking, and positioning their business for success and building relationships. The target audience for this track includes business owners, corporate procurement manag- ers, directors and corporate diversity staff. Inclusion Track The Inclusion Track will provide frameworks that allow participants to increase their cultural competence as well as learn strategies to effectively create or participate in diverse workplaces while supporting the mission of the organization. Mujeres (Women) Track The Mujeres Track provides tools and best practices for the topic of women in the workplace. The target audience for this track includes human resource professionals, managers, executives, diversity & inclusion professionals and college diversity & inclusion administrators.28 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
  29. 29. OutReach & retention Track Room: Franklin DThe Outreach and Retention Track provides tools to manage outreach, acquisition, retention of talent and thedevelopment of an inclusive climate within the organization. The target audience for this track includes humanresource professionals, manager, executives, diversity & inclusion professionals and college diversity & inclusionadministrators.Workshop 1: College Talent Outreach and Pipeline DevelopmentTime: 9:30 am – 10:30 amIntended Audience: Diversity & Inclusion Professionals, College Recruiters and College Diversity & InclusionAdministrators.Description: A panel of corporate and higher education professionals will discuss existing and planned collegetalent pipeline and outreach initiatives and how these fit within the strategic goals of their organizations. The goalis to provide attendees with concrete, practical ideas for developing their talent pools and offer networking oppor-tunities for organizations looking to form partnerships.Panelists: Alan Nevel, Director of Diversity, Limited BrandsFrancesca Jones, Campus Recruiter, Americas People Team, Ernst & Young LLP Casey Kirk, Talent Management, Honda of America Mfg., Inc.Felicia Sawyer, Academic Adviser and Staff Assistant, The Ohio State College of Engineering Minority ProgramsMinnie McGee, Assistant Dean, The Ohio State College of EngineeringModerator: Francisco Gómez-Bellengé, Associate to the Dean, Fisher College of Business, The Ohio StateUniversityWorkshop 2: Promoting an Inclusive Workplace: Forming Diverse Employee Engagement and RetentionStrategies based on the Latest Research FindingsTime: 10:40 am – 11:40 amIntended Audience: Diversity & Inclusion Professionals, College Recruiters & College Diversity & InclusionAdministrators.Description: This session will describe various employee engagement strategies and empirical evidence of theirsuccess—or lack thereof—when the target audience is diverse. The goal is to provide attendees with do’s and don’tsin developing employee engagement strategies.Presenter: Tracy Dumas, Assistant Professor, Human Resources, Fisher College of Business, The Ohio StateUniversityModerator: Joe Cisneros, Director of Workforce Diversity, American Electric Power Workshop 3: Employee Resource Group Best PracticesTime: 1:40 pm – 2:40 pmIntended Audience: Human Resource Professionals, Diversity & Inclusion Professionals, Employee ResourceGroups Constituents and Leaders, Executive Sponsors, Diversity & Inclusion Councils and anyone interested inlearning more about employee resource groups.Description: The facilitators will discuss how employee resource groups (also known as affinity groups or employ-ee networks) can be positioned as strategic resources to achieve business results, meeting the needs of the organi-zation as well as the needs of the constituents, and gaining support from leaders and partners of the organization.The goal is to provide attendees with concrete examples of how Latino Employee Resource Groups can add returnon investment (ROI) to your organization, sharing best practices and case studies.Presenters: Jorge L. Farías, Senior Consultant, Global Novations and Gustavo Gisbert, Manager, Global Novations Empleos & Employment 29
  30. 30. Leadership Development Track Room: Franklin A The Leadership Development Track will provide tools to increase participants’ ability to lead and influence their respective organizations. The target audience for this track includes corporate employees, human resource and diversity & inclusion professionals, managers and executives.   Workshop 1: “So you got the job, now what?” How to Gain Traction and Get Ahead Time: 9:30 am – 10:30 am Intended Audience:  New Hires, Young Professionals, Human Resource Professionals, Diversity & Inclusion Pro- fessionals. Description:  A panel of consisting of corporate human resource professionals will discuss tools and techniques that will enable participants to quickly and clearly differentiate themselves from others in the organization. The goal is to provide attendees with insight to excel and advance within their organizations. Panelists: Joe Cisneros, Director Workforce Diversity, American Electric Power (AEP) Andre Joyner, Director Talent Management, Limited Brands April Miller, Senior Vice President of Human Resources, SafeAuto Courtnee Carrigan, Director of Program Development, Community Advocacy & Partnerships, YWCA Moderator: Adrianna Melo – HR Manager, Mast Global Logistics   Workshop 2: Leadership in a Diverse, Multicultural Environment Time: 10:40 am – 11:40 am Intended Audience: Corporate Employees, Human Resource and Diversity & Inclusion Professionals, Managers and Executives. Description: This session will describe the critical knowledge and skills needed to successfully lead in today’s global environment. The goal is to provide attendees with essential tips to establish themselves as inclusive leaders. Presenter: Barbara Hess, Senior Consultant, Organizational Development, Cardinal Health Moderator: Yolanda Zepeda, Assistant Provost, Office of Diversity & Inclusion, The Ohio State University   Workshop 3: Success Narratives of Latino Professionals Time: 1:40 pm – 2:40 pm Intended Audience: Corporate Employees, Managers and Executives. Description: This session will feature four highly accomplished Latino professionals who have established them- selves as up and coming business and community leaders. The goal is to provide attendees with an opportunity to hear directly from several of Central Ohio’s leading Latino professionals on what it takes to be successful in the business world. Panelists: Graciela Chanfrau, Director of Human Resources, OSU College of Dentistry Beth Guzman-Bowman, Program Manager, The Ohio State University Medical Center Luis Machado, SVP Legal, Limited Brands Dr. Pedro Aguilar, President, Central Ohio Colon and Rectal Center, Inc. Moderator:  Roberto Torres, Director of Development, City of Akron, OH30 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
  31. 31. Entrepreneurship Research and Development Track Room: Franklin BParticipants will learn the importance of research, benchmarking and positioning their business for success andbuilding relationships. The target audience for this track includes business owners, corporate procurement man-agers, directors and corporate diversity staff. Workshop 1: Pipeline Development – Preparing to Fill the Funnel with ProspectsTime: 9:30 am – 10:30 amIntended Audience: Business Owners, Procurement Managers/Directors, Diversity Supply Staff, Sales and Busi-ness Development professionals.Description: Participants will learn the how to and why of client and competitor research, relationship building,benchmarking and positioning their business for success. The goal of this workshop is to ensure that attendeeswill better prepare to conduct business with Corporate America by following proven step-by-step instructions topresent themselves and their company, products and services in an engaging and meaningful manner.Presenter: Paula S. Carter, Manager, Procurement Diversity, Honda of America Mfg., Inc.Moderator: Kenny Ramos, President, Hispanic Chamber of Columbus  Workshop 2: Growth StrategyTime: 10:40 am – 11:40 amIntended Audience: Business Owners, Procurement Managers/Directors, Diversity Supply Staff, Sales and Busi-ness Development professionals.Description: Participants will learn about various strategies to position their business for growth. Topics will in-clude: Preliminary considerations: Why growth? What is the best way to grow? What is the best way to grow? Whatis market share? Growth Model – Strategic Alliance/Joint Ventures. The goal is to provide attendees with ideas onhow to structure a growth strategy and the reasons why.Presenter: Glenn Stafford, CEO, VAS Consulting.Moderator: Paula S. Carter, Manager, Procurement Diversity, Honda of America Mfg., Inc. Workshop 3: Successful Business Owners Share Lessons LearnedTime: 1:40 pm – 2:40 pmIntended Audience: Business Owners, Procurement Managers/Directors, Diversity Supply Staff, Sales and Busi-ness Development professionals.Description: Session will draw on the experience of business owners at various growth stages who will share thesuccess and mistakes made while establishing, marketing and growing their business. The goal of this session is toprovide the attendees with information that will assist in elevating their company to the next level.Panelists: Richard Miller, CEO, Owner, Fineline Printing, IndianaKim Martinez-Giering, CEO, Owner, KLN Transportation-ClevelandDavid Segura, CEO, Owner, Vision IT, MichiganSid Taylor, CEO, Owner, SET - MichiganModerator: Darryl Peal, President, South Central Ohio Minority Supplier Development Council Empleos & Employment 31
  32. 32. Inclusion Track Room: Fairfield The Inclusion Track will provide frameworks that allow participants to increase their cultural competence as well as learn strategies to effectively create or participate in diverse workplaces while supporting the mission of the organization.   Workshop 1: Reflections on African-Americans and Latinos: Collaboration or Chaos? Time: 9:30 am – 10:30 am Intended Audience: Human Resources, Diversity and Inclusion practitioners, Executives, Managers and those tasked with building more effectiveand collaborative teams. Description: African Americans and Latinos share similar problems and making coalitions of interest to address them makes logical sense. But, what is logical may not be politically feasible. Why?  Cultural competencies to make coalitions of interest over coalitions of color may not exist by spokespersons and leaders of both groups. That needs to change. Those of us who care about the quest for collaboration over conflict need to be empowered with the information as to the critical issues which drive the change agenda of both groups. The workshop will be spirited, informative, entertaining, well documented and full of practical steps to enhance coalitions rather than chaos be- tween members of these two demographic groups competing for scarce resources in urban America. Presenter: Dr. Samuel Betances, Senior Diversity Consultant, Souder, Betances & Associates, Inc. Moderator: Todd Tuney, Manager of Philanthropy, Limited Brands   Workshop 2: Speaking a Common Language Does Not Equate to Cultural Competence Time: 10:40 am – 11:40 am Intended Audience: Latino Professionals, College Students, Human Resource Professionals, Diversity and Inclu- sion Administrators and all those who wish to excel in diverse work situations. Description: Cultural competence refers to one’s ability to interact effectively with people of different cultures.  Simply communicating in a common language does not mean that we are culturally competent. This presenta- tion will encourage attendees to assess personal perspectives about cultural identity and to consciously strive to enhance cultural and linguistic competency skills. The goal is to provide attendees basic competency and linguistic strategies coupled with best practices which lend themselves to building and sustaining a culturally and linguisti- cally competent workforce. Presenter: Elba Montalvo, President/CEO, The Committee for Hispanic Children and Families Moderator: Alex Vargas, Human Resource Director, Compensation, Cardinal Health    Workshop 3: Current Landscape of Latinos in Ohio: Panel Discussion with OCHLA Commissioners Time: 1:40 pm – 2:40 pm Intended Audience: Human Resource Professionals, Diversity and Inclusion Administrators, Marketing Profes- sionals, Outreach Professionals. Description: This panel will provide an overall landscape of the Hispanic community in the State of Ohio includ- ing some of the successes and challenges that Latinos face in their personal, professional and civic lives. It will also provide information regarding opportunities to connect and work with the community across the state.  Panelists: Mary J. Santiago, Chair                   Andres Gonzales, Vice-Chair                                V. Anthony Simms-Howell, Commissioner       Lourdes Barroso De Padilla, Commissioner Rev. Max Rodas, Commissioner                          Emerald Hernandez, Commissioner                      Richard Romero, Commissioner Moderator: Reginald Fields, Columbus Bureau Chief, The Plain Dealer32 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
  33. 33. Mujeres (women) Track Room: Franklin CThe Mujere’s Track provides tools and best practices for the topic of women in the workplace. The target audiencefor this track includes human resources professionals, managers and executives, diversity and inclusion profes-sionals, college diversity and inclusion administratorsWorkshop 1: Life, Work, Integration: Prevalence, Utilization and BenefitsTime: 9:30 am – 10:30 amIntended Audience: Human Resources Professionals, Diversity and Inclusion Professionals, College Recruitersand College Diversity and Inclusion Administrators.Description: The presenter will speak about planning for work-life balance, the value of friendships, physical fit-ness, financial planning and learning when to say no. The goal is to provide attendees with concrete, practical ideasfor work-life balance.Presenter: Marsha J. Conaway, Regional Vice President, Human Resources Midwest Region, Time Warner CableModerator: Laura Palko, SPHR, Regional Project Manager, Human Resources Midwest Region, Time WarnerCable Workshop 2: Effective Strategies for Entering into Successful Mentor/Mentee RelationshipsTime: 10:40 am - 11:40 amIntended Audience: Human Resources Professionals, Diversity and Inclusion Professionals, Executive Leaders,Mentors and ARG sponsors.Description:  Mentoring can be a career propellant to assist members of the workforce without social capital toclimb to the top of their professions. First generation members of professional work teams face the daunting task ofidentifying caring, competent members of senior leaders and managers in corporations to agree to develop themfor greater leadership positions. Learning how to qualify as mentees/protégés as willing learners with the rightstuff, ready to be led in the eyes senior leaders is a critical first step in that process. Appreciating the differencesbetween what a mentor, a coach, or an advocate has to offer is also crucial in the quest to excel in complex organi-zations. Latinas who are hungry to matter and eager to learn will benefit from studying best practices to enter intorespectful, relevant, developmental relationships with older, more experienced, wiser generous senior membersin organizations. But there are goals to be achieved and pitfalls to avoid in the journey. This workshop will focuson effective strategies for mentoring Latinas in the workplace. Links and reading resources will be identified andshared in this spirited, highly interactive, entertaining and meaningful training session.Presenter: Dr. Samuel Betances, Senior Diversity Consultant, Souder, Betances & Associates, Inc.Moderator: Sandra Lopez, Co-Founder, Latinas in Ohio Facing Challenges and Taking Action Workshop 3: An Inspirational Conversation with Successful and Powerful WomenTime: 1:40 pm – 2:40 pmIntended Audience: Human Resources Professionals, Diversity and Inclusion Professionals, College Recruiters &College Diversity and Inclusion Administrators.Description: Panelists will share their inspirational stories of success. The goal is to provide attendees with inspi-rational stories of success to spark ideas for future goals and pathways to success.Panelists: Elizabeth Martinez, Assistant VP of School-based and Hispanic Mentoring, Big Brothers Big SistersTakeysha Cheney, Publisher & CEO, The Women’s BookVicki Bowen Hewes, Executive Director, Dress for SuccessAida Sabo, VP of Diversity and Inclusion, Cardinal HealthTara Abraham, President/ Owner of Accel Inc.Moderator: Guadalupe Velasquez, New Americans Coordinator, City of Columbus Empleos & Employment 33
  34. 34. Additional Speakers Dr. Samuel Betances, Senior Diversity Consultant Souder, Betances and Associates, Chicago Elba Montalvo, Executive Director The Committee for Hispanic Children and Families, Inc., New York Marsha J. Conaway Regional Vice President, Human Resources Midwest Region, Time Warner Cable, Columbus Richard Fry Senior Research Associate Pew Research Center, Washington DC34 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
  35. 35. Ohio Latino Demographics Ohio at a GlanceThe Latino population in Ohio and in the United States as a whole has continually been Hispanic Populationthe fastest growing minority group. This updated census information demonstrates the 354,674value of the Latino economic impact on Ohio’s economy, and is a testament to Latinos’role in getting Ohio back on track. Hispanics as Percent of StateOVERVIEW Population 3.1%• 354,674 people – 3.1 percent of Ohio’s total population (63.4% increase since 2000 Census)• 50 percent are of Mexican ancestry Median Age of• Median age of 25.2 years compared to 38.5 years for Ohioans as a whole Hispanics• Median household income: $36,014 25.5• 9,724 Hispanic-owned businesses with 1.9 billion in receipts• The number of Hispanic Ohioans in the civilian labor force is more than 197,000 Median Income, HispanicsAs demonstrated by the information presented above, Latinos continue to struggle in $36,014areas, such as educational attainment, home ownership and representation in public 
 
 
office. However, the statistics also demonstrate that Latinos are succeeding in manyother areas, such as in language acquisition, business ownership, and military service.Ohio’s Latino community is growing at a more rapid pace than last decade. According to the 2000 Census, La-tinos in Ohio had increased by nearly 30%, while Ohio’s population had decreased by 24,000 residents between2000 and 2007. According to Census data recently released, Latinos - as a percentage of the population - haveexperienced a 63.4% population growth over the 2000 Census.Ohio’s Hispanic community is estimated at more than 354,000 people, accounting for 3.1 percent of the state’stotal population. For the United States, taken as a whole, the Hispanic population is 45.4 million, or 15 percentof the nation’s total population, making Hispanics the fastest growing minority group.Hispanic Economic DevelopmentNationwide, data on Latinos indicate that the country is in the midst of a dramatic demographic shift that willmost assuredly affect its future complexion and bring about cultural impact. Projections now indicate that the“browning of America” is not only a growing reality, but that by the year 2050 nearly half of all Americans willbe a member of a minority group (people of color) and the majority will be Hispanic. The rapid rise in the His-panic population has now made it the largest minority group in the U.S. labor force. Empleos & Employment 35
  36. 36. As the fastest growing segment of the United States and its labor force, Latinos are integral to the nation’s eco- nomic prosperity; in 2050 one in three workers will be Latino. Moreover, the economic status of Hispanics has implications for the labor force as a whole. Latinos are less likely than their peers to hold financial assets and build wealth, which means that their labor market status heavily influences their economic standing. “I don’t want them to think, ‘I need to finish high school and college so I can go work for somebody.’ I want them to think, ‘I need to finish high school and college so somebody can work for me.’ A. J. Rodriguez, Presi- dent, San Antonio Chamber of Commerce. Nationally, Hispanic buying power will increase from $212 billion in 1990 to $1.3 trillion in 2013, an increase of 554.3%, which is higher than the growth rate for any other race or ethnicity. However, Hispanics only hold 3.1% of all board seats in Fortune 500 companies; entities who are benefitting the most from Latino consumerism (HACR, 2007). In order to participate fully in any community’s economic recovery, Latinos must succeed in the areas of grow- ing income and assets, supporting their children and youth, and overcoming obstacles faced by new immigrants and citizens alike in education and health care. A survey of Latino Business Leaders gathered at the 2009 Latino Economic Summit in Washington, DC re- sponded as follows to their perception of the country’s current economic situation: 54.5% rated the country’s condition as “poor”; 63.6% stated they “understood the recovery plan” yet 43.2% said over the course of the next year, they expect the financial situation of their family to “stay about the same;” with 36.4% indicating “improve some.” Still, Aida Alvarez, the first Latina to serve on the Cabinet as the head of the Small Business Administra- tion in the Clinton Administration in 1997, stated at the Summit, “I’m very optimistic that…we have the re- sources, the talent and the spirit of cooperation to turn this moment into a time of even greater opportunity.” Latina Business Ownership Latinas are starting business at six times the national average. More than 750,000 US businesses are owned by Latinas, comprising 37% of all Hispanic businesses. Latina businesses generated about $50 billion in sales in 2007. In 2007, women comprised 51% of the US population (154.7 million women), and Latinas made up about 15% of the female population in the US (US Census Bureau). Women account for nearly 47% of the US labor force, and Latinas about 12% of the female labor force. Nearly 51% of employed women in the US are in manage- rial and professional positions, yet 3.6% of Latinas are employed in that sector. Pay equity is a major challenge for women, especially Latinas. Today, women in the labor force earn 78 cents for every dollar a man earns; and Latinas earn 59 cents and African-American women earn 69 cents, respectively (National Hispanic Leadership Institute, 2009 Midwest Conference).36 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
  37. 37. Relationship between National and Local DataNationwide, data on Latinos indicate that the country is in the midst of a dramatic demographic shift that willmost assuredly affect its future complexion and bring about cultural impact. Projections now indicate that the“browning of America” is not only a growing reality, but that by the year 2050 nearly half of all Americans willbe a member of a minority group (people of color) and the majority will be Hispanic.The rapid rise in the Hispanic population has now made it the largest minority group in the U.S. labor force. Atthe dawn of the 21st century, Latinos are a group that requires considerable attention. In the U.S., Latinos nowrepresent the second largest Latino population among all nations in the world, second only to Mexico. Currenttrends will increase in upcoming decades for nearly all major geographic areas with large Hispanic concentra-tions, including Greater Cleveland. Locally, however, this is occurring within the backdrop of other related butextremely important data for the City.From the national view, nearly half of the U.S. growth last year was due to the Hispanic growth. Also, Hispanicswere the fastest-growing minority group last year. Likewise, all projections indicate that Latinos in the Cleve-land area are growing faster than any ethnic group in the Northeast sector of the State.The impact of the Latino growth is magnified by the fact that the White and African-American populations arenot only stable in size, but also older, with the Latino median age more than one decade younger than the U.S.average and, as a result, much more active in the workforce population. As an example, as the huge baby boomgeneration moves toward retirement, young Latinos are quickly filling in behind them. This is even more thecase for Cleveland, as the city has been losing population.Note:Information provided by the Ohio Commission on Hispanic/Latino Affairs. For more information contact theiroffice at 614-466-8333 or visit www.ochla.ohio.gov Empleos & Employment 37
  38. 38. 1 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Census 2010: 50 Million Latinos Jeffrey S. Passel, Senior Demographer D’Vera Cohn, Senior Writer Mark Hugo Lopez, Associate Director 1615 L St, N.W., Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20036 Tel(202) 419-3600 Census 2010: 50 Million Latinos Fax (202) 419-3608 www.pewhispanic.org Copyright © 2011 Hispanics Account for More Than Half of Nation’s Growth in Past Decade on Latinos (March 24, 2011)unt for More The 2010 Census counted 50.5 million Hispanics in the United States, making up 16.3% of theation’s Growth The nation’s Latino population, which was 35.3 million in 2000, grew 43% total population. over the decade. The Hispanic population also accounted for most of the nation’s growth— 56%—from 2000 to 2010. Among children ages 17 and younger, there were 17.1 million Latinos in 2010, or 23.1% of this age group, according to an analysis by the Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center. The number of Latino children grew 39% over the decade. In 2000, there were 12.3 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: million Hispanic children, who were 17.1% of the population under age 18. Jeffrey S. Passel, Senior Demographer D’Vera Cohn, Senior Writer Mark Hugo Lopez, Associate Director There were 33.3 million 1615 L St, N.W., Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20036 Tel(202) 419-3600 Hispanics ages 18 and older Fax (202) 419-3608 www.pewhispanic.org Copyright © 2011 Table 1 in 2010, a 45% increase from U.S. Population, by Race and Ethnicity, 2000. Hispanics made up 2010 and 2000 14.2% of the adult (thousands) population in 2010, 2010 2000 compared with 11% and 23 U.S. Population million people in 2000. Hispanic 50,478 35,306 White 196,818 194,553 Racial and ethnic minorities Black 37,686 33,948 accounted for 91.7% of the Asian 14,465 10,123 nation’s growth over the decade; non-Hispanic whites American Indian and Alaska Native 2,247 2,069 accounted for the remaining Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander 482 354 8.3%. Some other race 604 468 Two or more races 5,966 4,602 Hispanics, who can be of any Notes: Racial groups include only non-Hispanics. Hispanics are of any race. race, are the nation’s largest Source: Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of U.S. Census Bureau Redistricting_Files- minority group. Looking at PL_94-171 for states the major groups of single- PEW HISPANIC CENTER race non-Hispanics in 2010, 196.8 million (63.7%) were white; 37.7 million (12.2%) were black; and 14.5 million (4.7%) were Asian. There were 6 million non-Hispanics, or 1.9% of the U.S. population, who checked more than one race. By race, more than half of Hispanics—53%, or 26.7 million people—identified themselves as white alone, an increase from 2000 when 47.9% did. The next largest group, 36.7% or 18.5 38 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
  39. 39. 2 Census 2010: 50 Million Latinosmillion Hispanics, identified themselves as “some other race,” a decline from 2000, when42.2% did. An additional 6%, compared with 6.3% in 2000, checked multiple races.Although the numerical growth of the Hispanic population since 2000—more than 15 million—surpassed the totals for the previous two decades, the growth rate of 43% was somewhatslower than previous decades. Growth rates topped 50% in the 1980s (53%) and 1990s (58%).The count of the nation’s Hispanic population was slightly larger than expected. The 2010Census count of Hispanics was 955,000 people and 1.9% larger than the Census Bureau’s latestpopulation estimate for Hispanics. In some states, especially with small Hispanic populations,the gap was wider.Geographically, most Hispanics still live in nine states that have large, long-standing Latinocommunities—Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, New Mexico, New Jersey, NewYork and Texas—but the share living in other states has been growing.In 2010, 76% of Latinos lived in these nine states, compared with 81% in 2000 and 86% in1990. (In 2000, 50% of Hispanics lived in California and Texas alone. In 2010, that share was46.5 %.) Despite the pattern of dispersion, however, there are more Latinos living in LosAngeles County (4.7 million) than in any state except California and Texas.As the accompanying charts show, the stateswith the largest Hispanic populations include Table 2eight with more than a million Hispanics, the States with Largest Hispaniclargest of which is California, where 14 million Population Growth, 2000-2010Latinos were counted. (%) STATE GROWTH, 2000-2010The dozen states where Hispanics are thelargest share of the population include five South Carolina 148where Latinos are more than one-in-four state Alabama 145 Tennessee 134residents—New Mexico, Texas, California, Kentucky 122Arizona and Nevada. Arkansas 114 North Carolina 111The states with the largest percent growth in Maryland 106their Hispanic populations include nine where Mississippi 106the Latino population more than doubled, South Dakota 103including a swath in the southeast United Delaware 96 Georgia 96States—Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Virginia 92Mississippi, North Carolina, Tennessee and Source: Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of U.S. CensusSouth Carolina. The Hispanic population also Bureau Redistricting_Files-PL_94-171 for statesmore than doubled in Maryland and South PEW HISPANIC CENTERDakota. Empleos & Employment 39
  40. 40. 3 Census 2010: 50 Million Latinos In six states, growth in the Hispanic population accounted for all of those states’ population growth; if the Hispanic population had not grown, those states would not have grown. They included Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York and Rhode Island. In Michigan, the state population declined over the decade but the Hispanic population grew. Looking at the Latino population by region, the West and South are home to the most Hispanics, while growth has been most rapid in the South and Midwest. In 2010, 20.6 million Hispanics lived in the West, 18.2 million lived in the South, 7 million lived in the Northeast and 4.7 million lived in the Midwest. Acknowledgments Paul Taylor provided editorial guidance in the drafting of this report. Daniel Dockterman prepared the charts and tables and checked the text; Gabriel Velasco checked its charts and tables. Michael Keegan prepared the website graphics for this report. Molly Rohal was the copy editor for this report.40 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
  41. 41. 4 Census 2010: 50 Million LatinosAppendix: Additional Charts and Tables Table 3 Hispanic Child and Adult Populations, 2010 and 2000 ALL CHILDREN ADULTS Hispanic Population (thousands) 2010 50,478 17,132 33,346 2000 35,306 12,342 22,964 Hispanic Population Growth, 2000-2010 Growth (thousands) 15,172 4,790 10,382 Growth (%) 43.0 38.8 45.2 Hispanic Share of Total (%) 2010 16.3 23.1 14.2 2000 12.5 17.1 11.0 Notes: Children are those younger than 18; Adults are those 18 years of age or older. Source: Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of U.S. Census Bureau Redistricting_Files- PL_94-171 for states PEW HISPANIC CENTERTable 4 Table 5States with Largest Hispanic States with Largest HispanicPopulations, 2010 Share of Total Population, 2010(thousands) (%) STATE POPULATION STATE HISPANIC SHARE California 14,014 New Mexico 46.3% Texas 9,461 Texas 37.6 Florida 4,224 California 37.6 New York 3,417 Arizona 29.6 Illinois 2,028 Nevada 26.5 Arizona 1,895 Florida 22.5 New Jersey 1,555 Colorado 20.7 Colorado 1,039 New Jersey 17.7 New Mexico 953 New York 17.6 Georgia 854 Illinois 15.8 North Carolina 800 Connecticut 13.4 Washington 756 Utah 13.0Source: Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of U.S. Census Source: Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of U.S. CensusBureau Redistricting_Files-PL_94-171 for states Bureau Redistricting_Files-PL_94-171 for statesPEW HISPANIC CENTER PEW HISPANIC CENTER Empleos & Employment 41
  42. 42. 5 Census 2010: 50 Million Latinos Figure 1 Figure 2 U.S. Population by Race and U.S. Population by Race and Ethnicity, Ethnicity, 2010 and 2000 2010 and 2000 (%) (%) 2010 2000 2010 16.3 Hispanic Hispanic 12.5 16.3% White 63.7 White 63.7% Black 69.1 12.2% 12.2 Black 12.1 Asian 4.7 Asian 4.7% 3.6 Other 3.0% American Indian and 0.7 Alaska Native 0.7 Native Hawaiian and 0.2 2000 Pacific Islander 0.1 Hispanic 0.2 12.5% Some other race 0.2 Black White 1.9 12.1% 69.1% Two or more races 1.6 Asian 3.6% Notes: Racial groups include only non-Hispanics. Hispanics are of any race. Source: Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of U.S. Census Bureau Other Redistricting_Files-PL_94-171 for states 2.7% PEW HISPANIC CENTER Notes: Racial groups include only non-Hispanics. Hispanics are of any race. Source: Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of U.S. Census Bureau Redistricting_Files-PL_94-171 for states PEW HISPANIC CENTER42 2011 Ohio Diversity Latino Talent & Leadership Conference
  43. 43. 6 Census 2010: 50 Million LatinosTable 6: Hispanic Population by State, 2010 and 2000 HISPANIC POPULATION HISPANIC SHARE HISPANIC GROWTH (thousands) (%) (%) 2010 Rank 2000 2010 Rank 2000 2000-2010 RankUnited States 50,478 35,306 16.3 12.5 43 Alabama 186 33 76 3.9 40 1.7 145 2 Alaska 39 44 26 5.5 33 4.1 52 37 Arizona 1,895 6 1,296 29.6 4 25.3 46 40 Arkansas 186 32 87 6.4 29 3.2 114 5 California 14,014 1 10,967 37.6 3 32.4 28 48 Colorado 1,039 8 736 20.7 7 17.1 41 43 Connecticut 479 17 320 13.4 11 9.4 50 38 Delaware 73 41 37 8.2 26 4.8 96 10 District of Columbia 55 42 45 9.1 20 7.9 22 50 Florida 4,224 3 2,683 22.5 6 16.8 57 36 Georgia 854 10 435 8.8 24 5.3 96 11 Hawaii 121 39 88 8.9 22 7.2 38 45 Idaho 176 34 102 11.2 16 7.9 73 27 Illinois 2,028 5 1,530 15.8 10 12.3 32 47 Indiana 390 21 215 6.0 30 3.5 82 17 Iowa 152 36 82 5.0 35 2.8 84 14 Kansas 300 26 188 10.5 17 7.0 59 33 Kentucky 133 37 60 3.1 43 1.5 122 4 Louisiana 193 31 108 4.2 39 2.4 79 22 Maine 17 49 9 1.3 50 0.7 81 19 Maryland 471 18 228 8.2 27 4.3 106 7 Massachusetts 628 16 429 9.6 18 6.8 46 39 Michigan 436 20 324 4.4 38 3.3 35 46 Minnesota 250 28 143 4.7 36 2.9 75 25 Mississippi 81 40 40 2.7 46 1.4 106 8 Missouri 212 30 119 3.5 41 2.1 79 20 Montana 29 46 18 2.9 44 2.0 58 35 Nebraska 167 35 94 9.2 19 5.5 77 24 Nevada 717 14 394 26.5 5 19.7 82 16 New Hampshire 37 45 20 2.8 45 1.7 79 21 New Jersey 1,555 7 1,117 17.7 8 13.3 39 44 New Mexico 953 9 765 46.3 1 42.1 25 49 New York 3,417 4 2,868 17.6 9 15.1 19 51 North Carolina 800 11 379 8.4 25 4.7 111 6 North Dakota 13 50 8 2.0 48 1.2 73 28 Ohio 355 23 217 3.1 42 1.9 63 32 Oklahoma 332 25 179 8.9 23 5.2 85 13 Oregon 450 19 275 11.7 14 8.0 63 31 Pennsylvania 720 13 394 5.7 32 3.2 83 15 Rhode Island 131 38 91 12.4 13 8.7 44 41 South Carolina 236 29 95 5.1 34 2.4 148 1 South Dakota 22 48 11 2.7 47 1.4 103 9 Tennessee 290 27 124 4.6 37 2.2 134 3 Texas 9,461 2 6,670 37.6 2 32.0 42 42 Utah 358 22 202 13.0 12 9.0 78 23 Vermont 9 51 6 1.5 49 0.9 67 30 Virginia 632 15 330 7.9 28 4.7 92 12 Washington 756 12 442 11.2 15 7.5 71 29 West Virginia 22 47 12 1.2 51 0.7 81 18 Wisconsin 336 24 193 5.9 31 3.6 74 26 Wyoming 50 43 32 8.9 21 6.4 59 34Note: Growth and share are computed from unrounded data.Source: Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of U.S. Census Bureau Redistricting_Files-PL_94-171 for statesPEW HISPANIC CENTER Empleos & Employment 43

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