Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

From Fickle to Fan: A New Approach to Driving Advocacy in Food Services | Empathica Whitepaper

120

Published on

To download full whitepaper and learn a new approach to driving advocacy in food services, visit http://cem.empathica.com/FickletoFanFoodServices …

To download full whitepaper and learn a new approach to driving advocacy in food services, visit http://cem.empathica.com/FickletoFanFoodServices

For decades, restaurateurs thought they had loyalty all figured out. All they needed was to apply a simple process to identify the most devoted customers,

lavish them with attention and turn huge profits as they returned more often, ordered more food and became active advocates on behalf of the brand. Sometimes this approach worked, but often it didn’t.

Brands today face a big challenge when it comes to developing an understanding of guest loyalty and advocacy.

Download this whitepaper and find out:

•How your brand can use technologies such as "Big Data" to develop winning advocacy strategies
•The importance of understanding not only the "drivers" of loyalty but also the "drivers of the drivers"
•Why delivering consistent guest experiences at the local level is the first step to mobilize your brand advocates

To learn more about Customer Experience Management:

Product and services page http://www.empathica.com/products-services/
Resource center http://www.empathica.com/resources/
Blog http://www.empathica.com/blog/
Consumer insights reports http://www.empathica.com/consumer-insights/
Industry-specific expertise http://www.empathica.com/industries/

Connect with us:

Twitter http://twitter.com/EmpathicaCEM
Facebook http://www.facebook.com/EmpathicaCEM
LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/company/empathica

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
120
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. From Fickle to Fan:A New Approach to Driving Advocacyin Food ServicesAn Empathica Whitepaperwww.empathica.com
  • 2. From Fickle to Fan: A New Approach to Driving Advocacy in Food ServicesFor decades, restaurateurs thought they had loyalty all figured out. All they neededwas to apply a simple process to identify the most devoted customers, lavish them Determining whetherwith attention and turn huge profits as they returned more often, ordered more foodand became active advocates on behalf of the brand. customers were loyal was easy.Sometimes this approach worked, but often it didn’t.Determining whether customers were loyal was easy. Determining why they were Determining whyloyal was unfortunately closer to “art” than “science.” Keeping loyal customers loyal they were loyaldidn’t always translate into profits. Even well designed customer retention programsthat kept enthusiastic customers coming back to the restaurants could end up was unfortunatelychewing through more investment than they were worth. Figuring out what worked closer to “art”and what didn’t took a long time (getting an answer to the “why?” question), adding than “science.”risk to any new investment (see Figure 1).Figure 1. Brands need to better understand the “Why?” behind loyalty; Accordingto Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, emotional connections can only be achievedwhen all of a person’s basic needs are satisfied. SELF ACTUALIZATION ESTEEM SOCIAL SAFETY PHYSIOLOGICAL Abraham Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs 2
  • 3. From Fickle to Fan: A New Approach to Driving Advocacy in Food Services BIG DATAUsing “Big Data” to Develop Advocacy StrategiesToday, the science of “why?” has become a lot more precise. Technologies likethe Internet, smartphones, tablet computers and GPS location provide powerfulmeans to collect more data about guest behavior and communicate it faster. The Figure 2. Big data is data thatability to sift through huge volumes of dynamic information to derive patterns and exceeds the processing capacitydevelop loyalty strategies has never been stronger. In fact, a new term has emerged of conventional database systems.to describe the phenomenon: “big data” (see Figure 2 for a definition of big data). The data is too big, moves too fast, or doesn’t fit the structuresWith big data to back them up, advocacy builders can focus on what attracts of your database architectures.customers and prompts them to return: that magical mix of product, interior design, To gain value from this data, youservice and overall experience. Now, as art meets science, the results can be must choose an alternative wayassessed more immediately. Quick feedback leads to rapid readjustment. The drivers to process it.that deliver customer advocacy can be optimized to their full potential. Edd Dumbill, O’Reilly RadarWhile this endless fountain of customer information may seem overwhelming at first,given the right tools all stakeholders from corporate analysts to front line employeescan glean valuable, nuanced insights from this big data. For a corporate analyst,this robust data can unlock insights such as how particular products affect overallsatisfaction across multiple demographic segments. For front line staff, big data canunlock operational tips related to the service experience and tied to a particular daypart or week part. An example of this could be as simple as paying closer attentionto cleanliness on Sunday afternoons when families with children are more likely tovisit. It’s these small nuances that can ultimately separate good experiences fromgreat ones.The Drivers of AdvocacyThe fundamental drivers of advocacy are well known: things like product, service,speed, environment, location, price and perceived value for money. The curiosity ofmost research companies starts with surveys and ends with the respective weightgiven to each top-level driver.By contrast, such conclusions really mark the point where modern brand builders’curiosity should begin. No one can win at everything, so setting priorities is crucial.Which details are most important to a particular brand’s guests? What are the one,two or three things that truly differentiate a business?Behind the traditional stack-ranked elements that identify the importance of, forexample, product versus service, the breadth of data available today can helpuncover the pathways that lead to these elements. If friendly service is a key driver,it is important to look to understand the “drivers of the drivers.” What particular cuesin the environment are supported in turn by other elements that communicate thebelief that this is a friendly brand? To use a theatrical metaphor: What’s center stagefor the experience? Who are the supporting actors? What are the props or cues?The answers can be surprising. Many large full-service casual dining chains havesolicited market research and have collected guest feedback from which the recipe 3

×