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Jan Newton presentation on ocean acidification
 

Jan Newton presentation on ocean acidification

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  • Maintain existing surface current mapping capability and expand with new prioritized HF radar sites in the PNW. Maintain and expand observation capabilities in PNW estuaries. Strategically expand coverage and range of observations in the PNW shelf , in coordination with emerging national programs. Maintain and expand core elements of existing beach and shoreline observing programs in Oregon and Washington. Create a federated system of numerical daily forecasts of PNW circulation. Commence development of state of the art cross-shore profile change models and probabilistic shoreline change models . Bolster ongoing Data Management and Communications (DMAC) activities to support routine operational distribution of data and information. Build from and strengthen ongoing NANOOS education and outreach efforts.
  • The regional stakeholders and members of NANOOS have placed observing emphasis not only on the coastal ocean but also on its shoreline and estuaries. Here you see the Conceptual Design for NANOOS observing assets over the immediate future. NOAA funded NANOOS to implement this, although a severe (66%) federal budget shortfall dictates that not all of this can be implemented by 2010. However, there are significant baseline data upon which to evaluate climate variation and climate change that NANOOS supports, as shown here…. (read the bullets and point out, in case they don’t know the place names).
  • The regional stakeholders and members of NANOOS have placed observing emphasis not only on the coastal ocean but also on its shoreline and estuaries. Here you see the Conceptual Design for NANOOS observing assets over the immediate future. NOAA funded NANOOS to implement this, although a severe (66%) federal budget shortfall dictates that not all of this can be implemented by 2010. However, there are significant baseline data upon which to evaluate climate variation and climate change that NANOOS supports, as shown here…. (read the bullets and point out, in case they don’t know the place names).

Jan Newton presentation on ocean acidification Jan Newton presentation on ocean acidification Presentation Transcript

    • Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems
    • The Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) Regional Association for the Pacific NW
    www.nanoos.org
  • For today:
    • What is IOOS ?
    • What is NANOOS ?
    • How can one look at data ?
    • What else can one learn from NANOOS ?
    • The Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) monitors and collects data from the interior and coastal regions of the Pacific Northwest using a variety of platforms. How can the NW Tribes access this data, and how can they use it as a tool to better manage treaty marine resources?
    • Start a dialog on what you want to see from NANOOS
  • Congress: we need a system that can fill societal needs for ocean data
    • Must be sustained
    • Must be driven by users
    • Must be responsive to regional needs
    • Must fill needs from end to end
    The Integrated Ocean Observing System is designed to fill this need
  • Seven goals, one system
            • Improve predictions of climate change and weather and their effects on coastal communities and the nation
            • Improve the safety and efficiency of maritime operations
            • Improve forecasts of natural hazards and mitigate their effects more effectively
            • Improve homeland security
            • Minimize public health risks
            • Protect and restore healthy coastal ecosystems more effectively
            • Sustain living marine resources
  •  
  • Diverse Needs Require a Regional Approach
  • RA’s engage DIVERSE LOCAL STAKEHOLDERS assure CONSISTENT NATIONAL CABABILITY
  • Federal status:
    • In March 2009, the U.S. Congress passed the “Integrated Coastal and Ocean Observing Act of 2009.” This statute:
      • Establishes IOOS as a formal program and recognizes the regional systems as a key part of that program
      • Includes a provision that allows federal agencies to participate in RAs
      • Extends liability coverage to the regions for data dissemination
      • Establishes NOAA as lead agency to implement
  • www.ioos.gov
    • Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems
    • The Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) Regional Association for the Pacific NW
    www.nanoos.org
    • Western Association of Marine Laboratories
    • Science Applications International Corporation
    • OR Dept of Fish and Wildlife
    • King County Dept Natural Resources & Parks
    • Quinault Indian Nation
    • Western Resources and Applications
    • OR Dept of State Land
    • Columbia River Crab Fisherman’s Association
    • Port of Neah Bay
    • Northwest Research Associates
    • Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking Project
    • WA Dept of Fish and Wildlife
    • Northwest Aquatic and Marine Educators
    • Seattle Aquarium
    • NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center
    • Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe
    • The Nature Conservancy
    • Portland State University
    • NOAA Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary
    • VENUS/University of Victoria
    • University of Oregon
    • Ocean Inquiry Project
    • OR Dept of Land Conservation & Development
    • Surfrider Foundation
    • The Boeing Company
    • Oregon State University
    • Puget Sound Partnership
    • University of Washington
    • WET Labs, Inc.
    • Oregon Health and Sciences University
    • Quileute Indian Tribe
    • OR Dept of Geology and Mineral Industries
    • Humboldt State University
    • Marine Exchange of Puget Sound
    • WA Dept of Ecology
    • Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    • Port of Newport
    • Puget Sound Harbor Safety Committee
    • Sound Ocean Systems, Inc.
    • Council of American Master Mariners
    • Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement Group
    • Pacific Northwest Salmon Center
    • Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission
    • Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.
    NANOOS Governing Council Members 1/2010 NGO Federal/State/Local Government Industry Academia/Research Tribal Government
    • The NANOOS GC selected five areas from among results of numerous regional workshops as the highest regional priorities because “these issues represent those having the greatest impact on PNW citizenry and ecosystems and, we believe, are amenable to being substantively improved with the development of a PNW RCOOS” :
          • Maritime Operations
          • Ecosystem Impacts, including hypoxia and HABs
          • Fisheries
          • Mitigating Coastal Hazards
          • Climate, including ocean acidification
    • These priorities were put forth in our NANOOS proposal and are being addressed by the development of our regional coastal ocean observing system (RCOOS).
    Stakeholder Priorities
  • NANOOS RCOOS Current mapping Shelf moorings Beach/shoreline monitoring Estuary monitoring Circulation models Shoreline change models Data Management & Communications Education/Outreach
  • NANOOS RCOOS Conceptual Design
  • NANOOS RCOOS: 2007-2009 Implementation
  • Map 1a: Existing Observing Assets
  • PNW Ocean Observing Systems Design
  •  
  • The NANOOS Visualization System Serves cruise data Serves buoy data
  • Buoys:
    • Buoys outfitted with pCO2:
      • Murdock Charitable Trust grant to UW (NOAA partners): Buoy off La Push, WA, going in summer 2010
      • UW-NOAA collaboration: HCDOP-NANOOS “ORCA” profiling buoy in southern Hood Canal (Twanoh) since July 2009
      • Partnership-funded UW-NOAA collaboration: HCDOP-NANOOS “ORCA” profiling buoy at Duckabush moving to Dabob Bay, moving spring 2010
  • Existing profiling moorings Existing profiling buoys in Puget Sound
    • ORCA buoys
    • 4 buoys, 4 locations…
    • North of HC Bridge
    • Hama Hama River
    • Hoodsport
    • Sister’s Point
    “ O.R.C.A.” O ceanic R emote C hemical-optical A nalyzer Picture by: Wendi Ruef Part of NANOOS Observing System http://orca.ocean.washington.edu
  • Deep chlorophyll max Strong stratification Water column current profile Hypoxia at depth Nitrate profile
  • NOAA’s pCO2 sensors on the UW - NANOOS profiling “ORCA” buoy in Hood Canal. Data are relayed in near-real-time to UW and NOAA. UW – NOAA collaboration to measure ocean acidification:
  • ORCA sensor Package pCO2 equilibrator
  • The variability is associated with both physical and biological processes. A longer record is needed to assess whether the area is a net source or sink for CO 2 . Air Water Surface water CO 2 values are extremely variable in Hood Canal
  • Existing profiling moorings Planned profiling moorings Planned surface moorings Existing surface moorings Plan for buoys in Puget Sound Collaboration of UW and Intellicheck Mobilisa Add pCO2 sensors
  • Science Issues
    • WA coast is under sampled, physical dynamics are poorly resolved
    • WA coast has seasonal hypoxia, strong inter-annual variation, but dynamics are different than off OR
    • WA coast has a harmful algal bloom (HAB) “hot-spot” at Juan de Fuca eddy
    • WA coast impacted by ocean acidification, as is whole Pacific coast
    • Current model accuracy is limited by data input
  • Murdock Charitable Trust Award for observing assets Expected on-line 2010
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    • Provides an “Ocean Acidification” theme page on NANOOS web that has near real-time OA status data and informational material on OA, what is known, what is being done, and educational videos from lead scientists on OA
    NANOOS User Product Examples
  • NANOOS User Product Examples
    • Provides plots of near real-time surface temperature and currents off OR coast that is relevant and optimized for tuna fishing fleet. These are now known locally as the “Tuna plots”.
    • Provides a “Google”-based interactive map interface that allows public and managers to access tsunami evacuation routes for the Oregon coast. Next steps include working with Washington emergency officials to integrate evacuation maps developed for the Washington Coast
    NANOOS User Product Examples
    • Provides notification to the shellfish industry on near real-time water quality conditions so that they may strategize their growing activities (e.g., harvest, seeding, etc)
    NANOOS User Product Examples
    • Provides “one-stop-shopping” to mariners and others on tide, currents, and weather conditions
    NANOOS User Product Examples
  •  
  • Theme pages Live: Content development stage: Planning stages:
    • Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)
    • Coastal Change and Flood Hazards
    • Tsunamis
    • Beach Safety
    • Marine Spatial Planning
    • Climate Change as a Coastal Hazard
    • El Nino/La Nina
    • Maritime Operations
    • Fisheries
  • NANOOS Observer
  •  
  •  
  • NVS iPhone Application NANOOS Mobile iPhone App
    • Provides unprecedented convenience to a diverse set of users allowing mobile access and viewing of real-time regional ocean-observing information.
    NANOOS Visualization System (NVS) for the Web
      • Future Features
      • user-centered asset viewing by geospatial location (GPS),
      • user-defined event alerting by area or individual asset, and
      • sophisticated search for sensor asset & data discovery.
    Assets on Google Map Sensor Data Values Trends and Forecasts